Read Aloud Activities

Discussion in 'General Education' started by mathmagic, Apr 30, 2015.

  1. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Apr 30, 2015

    In previously doing read alouds, I've jumped between having students simply listening to the story, to allowing them to draw quietly, to asking them to draw visualizations as we go through each chapter in the book (taking a large construction piece of paper, folding it into 8 sections - for a total of 16 squares front/back, and using each square for each chapter). As I'm about to start another read aloud tomorrow - what are your thoughts: continue to do the visualization to keep them engaged in the story but also allow for some physical movement/art (as well as working a good comprehension strategy) or something else?
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Apr 30, 2015

    I've actually found my kids to be incredibly engaged during read alouds. I don't give them anything to do; they just sit and listen. They love being read to from chapter books.

    I do remember one of my elementary teachers letting us color in abstract designs while we listened. I loved the art (though I don't remember what she read). I do remember other teachers' read alouds from when I was in elementary school. I wonder if they had us do art then, too - I don't remember. It would be interesting to know whether kids pay more or less attention while coloring.
     
  4. ktdclark

    ktdclark Comrade

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    Apr 30, 2015

    I am interested in following this...I teach second grade. I read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory every spring and we spend the last few weeks of school doing activities related to the story. I have often wondered if I should be providing them the time to do visualizations...I do magnify the text while I am reading on the document camera so those that are interested can read along softly...
     
  5. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Apr 30, 2015

    I love this idea!

    I've read allowing students to draw, but don't allow them to do anything else. If a student is working on math, they can't fully concentrate on the story. Usually I tell them their job is to listen and they need to have their desks clear.

    I've always let them read along in a copy of the book.
     
  6. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Apr 30, 2015

    Mine tend to be too, but I have enough squirrely kids that I worry that without providing them something related to the book to do with their body, that they won't remember it / engage quite as well.
     

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