Re-phrasing "preserve voice while subbing"

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by thesub, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. thesub

    thesub Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    462
    Likes Received:
    7

    Nov 17, 2011

    How do you all manage not to raise your voice when the kids in the class don't behave? Is it useful to sip warm tea or something so that you don't go hoarse?

    Thanks :)
    thesub
     
  2.  
  3. Joy

    Joy Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Messages:
    579
    Likes Received:
    6

    Nov 17, 2011

    You need to have a clear signal that tells the student when to stop talking. It might be clapping a pattern for them to echo or a bell that you have in your bag. You just need some way of getting their attention when the room is noisy. Tell the students first thing in the morning what your signal is and have consequences if they do not follow.

    I think saving your voice is a challenge for all teachers. Since I sub for alot of music and have to switch from singing to speaking constantly, I am always trying to save my voice or I will be very hoarse by the end of the day.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,112

    Nov 17, 2011

    Have a good behavior management plan. Subs who need to yell to manage behaviors in my class do not get invited back.
     
  5. thesub

    thesub Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2008
    Messages:
    462
    Likes Received:
    7

    Nov 18, 2011

    thank you both.
    thesub
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,959
    Likes Received:
    1,148

    Nov 24, 2011

    I don't like to yell, and I don't even like to raise my my voice, because with both you can seem like you're loosing it, the kids got to you and they are winning.

    Some of the things have worked for me:
    - if there is some talking, I start talking, and then stop in the middle of my sentence, and stare at one of the students who wouldn't stop talking. This cause everyone one to look at at me and wait for what I was going to say, or what I'm going to do. They might think I'm now mad, but all I'm doing is waiting for them to stop talking. This usually works real well. At this point I can either continue, or address the behavior problems.

    - pick up the seating chart on a clipboard (or anything that could be it, even a roster) start writing, and looking at the students, as if I'm trying to make sure I'm writing about the right person. This also works well, maybe not every single time, but it does.

    - sometimes you just HAVE to talk to over them to tell them to be quite. (if all else fails) In this case, you have to find a way to project your voice, in a way it's stronger, a little louder, but not really raised. You still have to look like you're in control, and the kids are not bothering you. You're just handling the situation.

    - I also like to stare at the students, and i think I've gotten pretty good at it. Just look them in the eye with a straight face, and don't move a muscle ! :), just keep breathing slowly. It works so well.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,958
    Likes Received:
    2,112

    Nov 24, 2011

    Yes, yelling is a signal that a teacher may be losing control. Controlling behavior through intimidation, as some of the shared 'strategies' seem to be, is also not the best route. There are more effective, positive and proactive ways to manage behaviors. It's about being in control, not just LOOKING like you're in control.
    It seems there are many behavior mgt issue kinds of questions on the forums currently. It certainly is an area in which new teachers must develop proficiency QUICKLY as lack of mgt skills can end a career early on..
     
  8. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,094
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 24, 2011

    Q

    I use many of the same techniques as Linguist. I have a rather deep voice to begin with (not baritone-deep, but deep enough). It also carries very well, even when I'm speaking normally. So it isn't hard for the kids to imagine how loud it would be if I really put some effort into it. I also tell the class "PLEASE do not force me to talk over you. I CAN do it, if necessary, but it will disturb the other classes around us if I do."

    I normally use a low, calm tone with the class when I'm addressing behavior issues. I try to change the tone, volume and pitch of my voice when doing the lesson, so it isn't just a boring monotone.

    When students continue talking while I'm trying to speak, I explain that I have two rules in my room, the first of which is "When I'm talking, your are not talking." If talking continues after that, I will usually stop talking and look at the offending student. It only takes a few seconds for other students to catch the cue and start telling the student to be quiet.

    I remind students that I DO leave a report for the regular teacher describing the behavior of each class and specific individuals in a class, if necessary. After that, I've used the "writing stuff down on paper" technique myself.

    One of the primary punishments in our district is Silent Lunch. If some students insist on talking during class, I tell them I have no problem giving them Silent Lunch. They can be quiet now or they can be silent and sit away from their friends during lunch; the choice is theirs.

    I also once wrote names of offending students on the board. As each name went up, the room became quieter and quieter. When I finished, one of the students (whose name was on the board) asked what that meant. I said "You'll find out when Mr. Regular Teacher comes back." I could hear a pin drop in the class for the rest of the period.

    On very rare occasions, a class will continue talking after I've tried all of my usual methods. If necessary, I will raise my voice loud enough to shout "QUIET!", which usually works instantly. I then continue talking in an even lower tone than normal to let the kids know they've pushed the boundary as far as they're allowed.

    By far, though, my most effective technique is learning as many names in the room as possible. Kids tend to pay a lot more attention when you call them by name, whether it is to answer a question on the board or telling them to be quiet. Addressing them personally lets them know I am speaking directly to them and that is usually all that is needed to calm most of them down.
     
  9. Anonymousteach

    Anonymousteach Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2011
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 28, 2011

    I used to raise my voice all the time when I first started subbing, and I didn't like it. Now that I've been doing this job for a while, I've found a technique that works for me, and this does work believe it or not: If I try to start the class and the students are still talking, I just stop talking and stand there silently with my arms folded. Most of the time, they catch on pretty quickly, some classes are faster than others, but I've never had to wait longer than 30 seconds.

    Another technique I'll use when it's just one or two students that decide they're going to have a conversation while I'm talking, I just stop talking smile at them and wave and say "Hi, I'm talking." It quiets them down.

    I sub for the secondary level, so most of the time the teacher just assigns a packet of papers for the class to work on, or book work. While they are working on the assignment, I usually have no objection to them talking to their friends, as long as they're getting work done and not being loud. When the entire class gets too loud, I'll just tell them all to quiet down.

    I know these ideas might sound a little strange, but I find they work for me. You just got to be firm. Good luck with everything!
     
  10. StellatheSub

    StellatheSub Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2010
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 5, 2011

    Comment

    I just wanted to tell everyone that just because someone's voice is bothering them at the end of the day doesn't mean they are raising it or yelling. I had laryngitis for a week straight a month and a half ago and my throat still gets sore after I talk a lot during the day. I have always been susceptible to that, especially during student teaching, because I wasn't used to talking that much, not because I was yelling. Now, I try to remember to carry cough drops in my sub bag, even when I'm not sick. I also drink hot water with honey and apple cider vinegar; sounds gross, but it's a home rememedy that works pretty good! I have been using a new classroom signal that works pretty good where I have the students all put their hands on top of their heads if they can hear me. If you are really worried about talking at all to get the classe's attention, you can always clap a rhythm, which works really good to preserve your voice!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. waterfall,
  2. miss-m
Total: 242 (members: 4, guests: 214, robots: 24)
test