Raising hands to get out of seats

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Bella2010, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Messages:
    807
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 7, 2011

    Do you guys do this? I started at the end of last year because I was tired of the constant up, down, up, down, by some of the kids. However, the constant up, down, up, down of the hands was also tiring.

    Suggestions and thoughts?
     
  2.  
  3. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Messages:
    3,506
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 7, 2011

    I ask my kids to raise their hands before they get out of their sits because it unnerves me when someone is suddenly standing up. LOL. Rather than the big hand waving gesture, though, we talk about just a slight raise of the hand or finger to get my attention. Also, I tell them that if I'm directly teaching, it needs to be a dire emergency to ask to leave their seat or my room.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 7, 2011

    I really limit when they may leave their seat. When I am teaching, there is no leaving your seat. During work time, you can get up for things but rarely. I start reading time by having the students make sure they have their supplies, I ask them to gather what they need and move to a reading spot in a certain amount of time. Same for writing.
     
  5. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    733
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 7, 2011

    I'd rather them be able to get up and get what they need without having to ask because it becomes a distraction. In the beginning of the year the kids were raising their hand for a tissue, I put an end to that fast.
     
  6. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 7, 2011

    Same here. As long as they are getting a pencil, bathroom, tissue, or turning something in I do not mind. When I notice a child going over to talk to another then I may say something. Most of the times if they are going to talk to someone they are helping the student with something.
     
  7. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    6,169
    Likes Received:
    1,576

    Aug 7, 2011

    I use the CHAMPs management program, so I teach student when they can and can't be out of their seats. At times when I allow it, they don't have to ask. Other times it's emergencies only. We discussed what makes an emergency. I do always have some kids with special needs, and I have signals with them so they can get up if needed.
     
  8. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Messages:
    370
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 7, 2011

    I had to have the kids raise their hands before they got of their seat. Because they would use their time out of their seat to be nosy. About the touching, I had to monitor the kids when they got out of the seat because they would play stupid versions of "you are it" by tapping somebody, kicking their shoes, etc. even when they have to go to the pencil sharpener. Then the other person would hit the original person because they hit them and they had to hit them back. Then the taps, would go to punches, then chest posturing, etc. This year, my boys will have minimum movement since I am in a smaller room. If they can handle it, I will be less strict about their movements. They are going to have to earn it, though. I will have two hand held pencil sharpeners in plastic containers which they can past along.

    Last year, my boys can not handle too much freedom (part of it was me being a new teacher-changing my procedures often and not being consistent with them).

    This year, I will be really stern and consistent for the first couple of days. Then, I will see how things go. I will have signals in which they tap their pencil if they need to sharpen their pencil or tap their nose if they need tissue. Hold out their agenda if they need to go to the bathroom.
     
  9. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Messages:
    370
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 7, 2011

    That's cool that your kids are mature to handle this responsibility. Last year, we started using the Y-chart from CARE (how should it look like, sound like, and feel like) and stepping away from CHAMPS. What you do can still be applied to the Y-chart. I think my little experience (and lack of confidence) also affected my boys following my rules. Near the end of school last year, I had much fewer kids getting out of their seat because they knew the consequences. Also, closer to the end of the year, I was better at catching students' butts leaving their seats without permission before they caused any trouble.


    I am more confident coming in this year. Also, I feel that I will be able to catch kids misbehaving before things escalates.


    :hijack: As a fellow Kentucky teacher, Ima Teacher, I have a question. Do you have CARE (or CPR) in your school/district? Just curious. Thanks
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Aug 7, 2011

    You teach 6th grade. Trust me, they know exactly what to do by that time. The number of times they should be getting out of their seats, aside from an emergency, should be very limited by the time they're 11 years old.

    But they also know that they can do whatever a teacher allows them to do. If you waited until the end of the year to enforce a rule that they were expecting on day 1, I can see how you would meet some resistance.

    Start this time on day 1. And correct the very first kid who doesn't follow procedure. And the second. And keep on correcting until they realize that your class is one where the expectations will be met.
     
  11. Lynn K.

    Lynn K. Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2007
    Messages:
    803
    Likes Received:
    4

    Aug 7, 2011

    I'm the same way. When I was in 6th, my teacher had a rule that we couldn't get out of our seats for any reason while he was teaching. I had terrible allergies and couldn't get up for tissues! It was embarrassing and uncomfortable; if I'd been able to get a tissue (or 10), I would have been more able to concentrate!

    So - my students are allowed to get up as long as they aren't distracting others. I've even had two students who paid attention better when they were standing in the back of the room or by their desks.
     
  12. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,489
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 7, 2011

    I don't have them raise their hands to get up for a tissue. It drives me nuts. They have trash cans on the table, so they don't need to get up for that. They borrow pens before class even starts. And if they need the bathroom, they hold up their planner for me.

    I've found that once they know they can get up, they don't need to nearly as much.
     
  13. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2011
    Messages:
    883
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 7, 2011

    If I am in the middle of teaching, I ask students to raise their hands if they would like to leave their seats. I obviously don't mind them getting a tissue, but I like them to wait to sharpen their pencils until after I'm done talking. If students are working independently or in groups, they can do these things without asking permission first.
     
  14. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,188
    Likes Received:
    195

    Aug 7, 2011

    Most kids test the teacher at school start-up not to find out the rules (they already know them) rather to find out what will be allowed. If "raise your hand to get out of your seat" is the rule the first thing kids will do is start raising hands to get out of their seats. It's virtually impossible to do any work with one hand waving in the air. Not only does the student get a break from learning once out of seat but can, also, delay work while waiting to be recognized by teacher.

    Who raises their hands anyway? Is it the confident, on-task, self-disciplined kids who bring their materials to class every day? Maybe. More likely it is the same 5-6 every period who make hand raising an Olympic sport. If they didn't raise their hands it would mean they have two hands to move a pencil and hold paper. Not good form if one wants to get up, take the circular route to the pencil sharpener (or faucet), grind pencil to NASA tolerances, and stop a couple times on way back to seat to catch up on latest Access Hollywood news.

    Consider: Use 4x6 index cards, one for each student. Fold like a tent.
    "Up' on desk means "Question?" Down means working. This eliminates hand waiving and keeps students working with both hands.
     
  15. juliechsa

    juliechsa Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2011
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 7, 2011

    Mine can get up for tissue at time. Pencils can be sharpened any time I'm not doing direct instruction or read aloud. Drinks and bathroom they need to ask as they have to travel a fair ways. I encourage water bottles, but that increases the need for the bathroom!
     
  16. LiveNLearn

    LiveNLearn Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2008
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2011

    1 finger= I need to get out of my seat.
    Holding up a bathroom pass = I need a potty break.
    Hand raised = I need help.

    I was tired of rushing to help a student with a hand up only to find out they needed to get a pencil or go to the bathroom. Now I can identify what a kid needs from across the room and give them a nod to get out of their seat without stopping what I am doing.
     
  17. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    11

    Aug 8, 2011

    My rule is that they do not get up from their seats when I am teaching. Otherwise, it is generally not a problem. I do have older kids so this helps.
     
  18. Marci07

    Marci07 Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2008
    Messages:
    1,017
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2011

    My first year of teaching I would allow students to get up and walk as needed. Working in an inner city school with gang issues, I learned right away that getting up to throw a paper or sharpen a pencil was many times an excuse to walk towards a buddy to cause trouble. I also have to be constantly watching for any confrontations that could lead to fights.

    I know that it may appear ridiculous or extremely strict to others but I have a rule of "not getting out your seat without permission" that I constantly enforce from day one. Kids complain at first but they also feel safe in my classroom. I also make a point of incorporating hands-on activities where students can move around in an organized manner but I'm still watching carefully what they do.

    When I taught gifted students I relaxed this rule because I could trust students.
     
  19. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,719
    Likes Received:
    482

    Aug 8, 2011

    I do 2 on the floor during independent work times. That means only 2 people can be up at any time for any reason (kleenex, pencil sharpening, changing out books from classroom library, etc.) During teaching times, they are not allowed up. Students learn quickly, and most are able to figure out that if they have a runny nose, they should get tissue before I start teaching.
     
  20. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2009
    Messages:
    733
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 8, 2011

    That sounds like a good system, but it would take a lot of my attention as well.


    On a side note, you don't really call it a potty break to 6th graders do you?
     
  21. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    6,169
    Likes Received:
    1,576

    Aug 8, 2011

    Most of my students are quite able to be responsible about getting up. Sometimes I have individual students who can't handle it. Plenty of years I've had particular students who can't get up even when others can. They can't handle it, so they don't get that option. Being "fair" doesn't mean that I have to treat everyone the same. When I have 24 kids who can handle the freedom, I'm not going to let the 25th kid who can't be the one to run the show. It works the other way, too. Sometimes I have "no out of seat" activities, but sometimes I have a student who NEEDS to be up. I had one who used to pace the hallway during silent reading time. He was reading, but he couldn't be still and do it. He drove us crazy in the room if he had to sit still and read.

    I've had my kids for three days. Today during direct instruction, one of my students got up to toss something in the trash. Another student told him to sit down because I was talking and he didn't see blood or vomit (my two "emergency" indicators).
     
  22. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    6,169
    Likes Received:
    1,576

    Aug 8, 2011

    Is that part of KYCID? We rotate people who go to those meetings, and I went through a rotation a few years ago. I have too many acronyms in my life, so I don't know CARE and CPR. :lol:
     
  23. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 8, 2011

    My kids are not allowed to get out of their seat AT ALL when I am teaching. During independent work they are permitted to go to the bathroom, get tissues. I do not allow them to sharpen pencils during work. That is something that is taken care of at the beginning of the day by the Pencil Sharpener. (I loathe the sound of the sharpener.)
    If I see students abusing the bathroom privilege during independent practice that I began limiting their usage and make them ask me before they go so I can more closely monitor.
     
  24. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    3,729
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2011

    When I am giving instructions they need to ask. When it's a work period they can get up if they need to, but if they don't finish their work they have to make it up to me during our free period when other kids are drawing or playing games.

    I do the free period once a week. Kids who are done with everything get to have some choices. Kids who don't use their time wisely miss out on the free period and finish their work at that time.
     
  25. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    538

    Aug 9, 2011

    This is what I do. I encouraged them to work together and move around the room. If they needed help with an assignment (especially one that they had to complete on their own) then I required them to put up their hand for help. I don't like students following me around the room asking questions! I always said, "Stop chasing me! Sit down!"
     
  26. LiveNLearn

    LiveNLearn Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2008
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 9, 2011

    :eek: Maybe.... :eek:
     
  27. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    3,426
    Likes Received:
    601

    Aug 9, 2011

    I call it a potty break with my high schoolers, but I always disclose that I taught early childhood for more years than I've taught high school and old habits are hard to break! That said, I have students tell me "I need to go tinkle" or other such phrases. They really sometimes are little kids, but bigger!
     
  28. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Messages:
    807
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 9, 2011

    Oh, so do I!!!! They aren't allowed to sharpen their pencil while I'm teaching. The only electronic pencil sharpeners the school will provide are the small ones that DO NOT hold up well, so the kids stand over there for three minutes trying to sharpen one pencil. The old school sharpener in my room is so dull it's basically worthless. The noise is a distraction for students. On the kids' supply lists, they are supposed to buy small hand held sharpeners, but these usually get lost within the first few months of school, or they get dull, break, etc. Anyway, for the above reasons, I'm thinking seriously of having a "pencil person" whose responsibility is sharpening pencils at the beginning of class. Each student would get two pencils and return them at the end of the morning/afternoon, in theory. :rolleyes:

    Beth
     
  29. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Aug 9, 2011

    I use hand signals:
    1 Finger--Exchange Pencil
    2 Fingers--Tissue (I've had groups that like to congregate around the tissues...)
    3 Fingers (like a 'W')--Water
    4 Fingers--Restroom
    5 Fingers--Question

    I have signs posted in my room, but they learn them quickly. I then only need to nod or shake my head. They know that if it's an emergency, they can go without asking.
     
  30. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Messages:
    2,237
    Likes Received:
    9

    Aug 9, 2011

    My students raise there hand. We have different symbols for different needs. For instance 3 fingers is for tissue, which is what they want 99% of the time. Most of the time if I am walking around the classroom as I teach I'll just bring them the box. I also have a gesture that I give when I give them permission to get up, so it all happens without a word being spoken and cuts down on others being disturbed.
     
  31. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2006
    Messages:
    2,735
    Likes Received:
    5

    Aug 9, 2011

    When I'm not actually teaching I usually don't care if they sharpen their pencil or get Kleenex, but it bothers me when they go into their cubbies, so I nix that in the bud early on (for the most part....) But it drives me bonkers when they come up to me to ask me something. I've never managed to break every student of that habit every day.
     
  32. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Messages:
    2,974
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 9, 2011

    It would drive me nuts if a student raised his hands during a lecture or discussion to ask to go the bathroom or to get out of their seats. I ask that students remain seated and quiet during lecture and discussion. I keep my lectures and discussions relatively short and to the point no more than 30 to 40 minutes of my classes are spent with me lecturing. If a student needs a tissue I don't have a problem with them getting up. If they can't see I also don't have a problem. The same goes for if they have ran out of paper or if their laptop is dieing--fix the problem yourself don't get me involved.

    I let students know that lecture is not a time to interrupt me to go to the bathroom. During group or independent work is fine, but when I'm lecturing it's distracting for the whole class. Thus, any bathroom breaks during lecture should be an emergency only. Don't interrupt me to go. Take the pass, sign-out, and leave. If you do this often there will be consequences.
     
  33. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Messages:
    370
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 9, 2011

    Oh. Not a problem. I can't remember what CARE stands for. CPR is called Circle of Power and Respect. We spend 20 minutes in a structured format to talk and reflect on certain themes. Examples include how to handle differences respectfully, emotional well-being, learning skills, friendship, communication, etc. It includes daily news, circling up, greeting, activity, and then reflection.
     
  34. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Aug 10, 2011

    We work a lot on that in third grade. In fact, one of the things I say most often is, "I think that's a problem you can solve on your own." But it really takes a while for many of them to get there, especially if they aren't expected to do any of it at home!
     
  35. MLB711

    MLB711 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2011
    Messages:
    376
    Likes Received:
    53

    Aug 10, 2011

    It definitely depends on the age of the kids, how much I can trust them, and the school policy on leaving the room. The school policy during student teaching required students to have a signed pass in their agenda, so they would come up to me in the middle of lecture. I didn't really have a problem with it because whatever the student misses is their responsibility to make up on their own time. They shouldn't come to me to re-lecture them because they chose to go to the bathroom. But I'm teaching high school. If I were teaching MS, I would (like Brendan) tell the students they can go during group/independent work but not during lecture unless it's a vital emergency. I also despise signing passes in the first 10-15 minutes of class. They should take care of their bathroom/drink/going to ask a teacher a question needs BEFORE coming to my class.
     
  36. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 10, 2011

    What are they getting out of their seats for?? I didn't really feel this was an issue in fourth grade. (There was 1 student who refused to sit in his seat and was around the room all day, but that's a whole separate issue.)

    I had a different hand signals, 3 fingers up meant they needed the bathroom, 2 meant they needed a drink. This wasn't frequent enough that it bothered me. They would all be allowed a drink after recess and except for when it was super hot drinks weren't a big issue. We have processes for a table monitor to gather all supplies needed for each assignment/activity so there was rarely a reason for them to get up.

    Of course while they were doing independent/group work there would be more kids moving around but as long as they were on task (getting extra paper, choosing to move to the rug to work) it didn't bother me.
     
  37. Aussiegirl

    Aussiegirl Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 10, 2011

    I liked it best when I had a "no go unless puking or bathroom emergency". Very few ever abused this. When we decided to go with a team-wide policy of a certain number of passes per marking period, I made passes with their names on them. I signed the pass when they gave me one and they had to return it to me and I destroyed it. So many times I find that if I tell a child, please try to wait a few more minutes, they often forget and keep on working! How badly did they have to go?!

    Generally I tell my kids they can go get a tissue at any time - no talking and use hand cleanser when done. No more than one person at the kleenex box at a time. I also loath the sound of hte pencil sharpener during class. They are to sharpen them before class/during bell work time, or use the hand sharpener any time I'm not lecturing. Once again, abusers get called out.

    I also keep extra lined paper in the back of the room in a tray. I tell the kids, if you forgot paper, please help yourself to a sheet and write a reminder in your planner to get more from the store. I tell them in the beginning of the year that sometimes they may run out or forget - once in a while is human. Frequently is abuse. I caught kids taking stacks of paper to fill their binders!

    I got an idea somewhere on this site a couple of years ago for a Student Central area. It is a small table with extra pencils, pens, paper, tissues and hand cleaner along with the file crate containing make-up work if they are absent. I think it helps when they know they have an area that is theirs.

    Other than emergencies and questions, no passes out of the room while I lecture. Can write a pass that I'll sign when they are doing group work - don't make a habit. Nurse - quickly let me know, grab the nurse pass.
     
  38. kbee1219

    kbee1219 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2010
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 11, 2011

    signs

    I use sign language letters that are on signs in the are in the front of the room for tissues, book, pencil sharpener (which is handheld and brought to their table), and thumbs up to get out of their seat. I teach the kids the signs and review it often with them. In fact if they don't use the right sign they don't get what they need. They usually catch on pretty quick. As for the bathroom, since I'm in a middle school they have bathroom time before and after class during transitions. In an emergency they get a limited time for a pass anytime after that they make up after school. This really helps keep down the hall walkers.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. catnfiddle,
  2. blazer
Total: 221 (members: 3, guests: 204, robots: 14)
test