Race Card: I'm sick of it.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by firemaple, Feb 16, 2008.

  1. firemaple

    firemaple Companion

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    Feb 16, 2008

    Hoping someone here may have some ideas.

    A new student entered my class and is just one of the angriest young boys you ever did meet. He walks in with a scowl, snatches papers out of my hand and hates everything, even when we have done fun games that everyone else enjoys.

    He's black and not long after being in my class he began crying racism at every turn. (I'm a white male)

    I try so hard to treat everyone the same and probably over compensate by treating my white students a little tougher just to help curb any claims of racism.

    This is so ridiculous that I can't even believe I'm posting about it.

    None of my other students prior to him being in the class ever cried racism, but now they have jumped on the bandwagon too.

    Has anyone else dealt with this?

    I teach in a juv. detention center. The class makeup is about 75 percent black.

    I've tried to use reason and logic to no avail. That doesn't work, after all, the racist claims are not based on anything approaching logic anyway. For example, I've punished two students recently, one white and one black, exactly the same and still been called a racist.

    So, I think I'm going to just tell them on Monday that the race card days are over. I'm not entertaining any more bogus claims of racism and I will begin issuing warnings for every cry of racism just as if it were a class disruption, since that's what it is anyway.

    Any ideas on this one?
     
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  3. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    Feb 16, 2008

    wow; I wish I could help you out, but I have no experience with this. I'm sure there are others here that will do justice. I wish you well. :love:
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Feb 16, 2008

    I think I'd recommend a slightly different tack (Real Live Classroom Teachers, kindly feel free to tell me this is wrong and how):

    Start off on Monday by reminding your students of the rules about disruptions and the consequences for disruption - for any disruption. That is, don't make this be about the outbursts about racism: make it be about outbursts, period. Then, when the young man acts out again, point out in a calm and level tone of voice that that's a disruption, and (if you've decided not to give him a warning for first offense) apply whatever the consequence is - but at no point let this be about racism.

    You could also consider (though this may need to wait till later) getting a discussion going about how it feels to the rest of the class when one member pointedly shuts everyone out - because the fact is that his failure to engage is shutting out everyone else, not just you.

    And look for opportunities to catch him doing something non-angry in class.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Feb 16, 2008

    TG - great advice! My cooperating teacher had to completely take over the disciplinary consequences for two boys in our 3rd grade class. She is African American, and so are they. I am native American, but one of the boys' parents decided that I was picking on her son because he was black! Nothing could be further from the truth! When he was "good," "J" was the brightest & best student in the class! He just decided some days that he was not going to work or follow directions, and would not conform to "classroom" behavior.
     
  6. eduk8r

    eduk8r Enthusiast

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    Feb 16, 2008

    I like TG's advice. :) Also, what subjects do you teach? Can you widen the boy's world a little bit? If so, go to www.pbs.org to start. They have many lessons for teachers that will help you help this boy open his eyes and widen his horizons beyond what he has known. There are great lessons on history that will show him other aspects of his heritage.

    There are many programs, too. Right now especially the programming is just wonderful for this kind of thing, because it's African American History month. We watched a show Thursday night that was just such a hopeful, healing experience for the people in it. Several of them were stars. Morgan Freeman was one, Chris (?) a comedian, Tina Turner, and plenty of just regular people. It was "African American Roots, Part II." Just look it up, please. They learned things about their family histories that you could see had a mighty effect on the way they see themselves and others. You could see it on their faces. Especially Morgan Freeman, you could see that what they learned had just overturned everything he had ever thought about his ancestors! He looked like he wanted to reject it at first, because he was so comfortable thinking what he had always thought and now he'd have to change it. Then this look of I don't know, pride, acceptance, and a new beginning showed on his face. It was really moving.

    You are right to be angry at these unjust accusations and that you have to bear the brunt of the anger that you have not earned. I would be angry, too. I would be determined to attempt to help the boy to see that he actually has power over himself and where his life goes. You never know what kind of a difference that could make. Good luck and God bless you in your work, you are doing such an important job. :)
     
  7. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Feb 16, 2008

    I don't remember the exact situation, and racism wasn't the claim, but a new student in an upper grade always squawked about some sort of unfairness whenever he didn't get his way. I don't recall just what term it was he used, but it was just ludicrous. After trying many different things, the teacher pulled him out into the hall and just laid into him.

    "Look, I don't know where you think you are seeing bullying (or whatever it was) taking place in this room. Every student has tried repeatedly to welcome you into the class and include you in activities. You are the one who has decided everything and everyone is against you. Now, if you insist on crying wolf every time things don't go your way we can arrange for you to spend your classes in the principal's office. Make you choice now or I'll call Mrs. So and So."

    That did the trick and he never said another word about it. By the end of the year he was bending over backward for that teacher. I guess he just needed/wanted someone to call his bluff.
     
  8. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Feb 16, 2008

    I have never had anyone pull the race card on me, but last week someone tried to pull it on the lunch lady because she sent them to the end of the line. The kids said she did it because they are black. I told them to look around, about 70% of the kids around them were black and didn't get sent to the end of the line.

    Anyway, kids will try whatever they think will get under your skin. I wouldn't respond any different to the race card than I would for any other excuse they come up with for misbehavior. If he sees it won't get to you maybe he will stop.
     
  9. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Feb 16, 2008

    I agree that you cannot and should not focus on the racism... yes, it bothers you, but if you come down on it, I have a feeling it will continue and continue.

    I was going to say that this boy is most likely a product of his envronmnet... he's heard and seen people use "the race card" and so this is what he is used to.

    I'd say that no matter what you would like to do, you simply must bite your tongue. By being consistent and fair he will get tired of crying racism............. hopefully.

    You have a hard job-and I admire you for it.
     
  10. Southernese

    Southernese Rookie

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    Feb 17, 2008

    This is actually kind of a scary situation, because sometimes the race card can get people in trouble or fired, even when the accused is completely innocent.
     
  11. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Feb 17, 2008

    My first thought when I saw the original post (before reading everyone's input) is that I know at that age (high school), I was just starting to discover myself. I was questioning my place in the world and where I stand. That age is not yet mature enough to handle subtleties. I know early college I was defending myself against the world. Every minor issue that came up that I felt was discrimination was met with full force. Over time I learned what needed to be addressed and what was really no big deal (ie, pick my battles). It starts out as a confusing time when you sort of think you know it all but then again you don't. Then I felt empowered because I had the law on my side and I knew how to use it. As I get older I realize there are better ways of dealing with some issues and other times that approach is still necessary.

    The other thought I had was about a friend I grew up with. She heard "n******" and all kinds of negative terms and attitudes growing up. I grew up in the same town and neither of us was really exposed to many black people. My attitude was MUCH different than hers. She still has issues with going to a place that black people frequent. I really don't understand it but I know it comes from constantly listening to it growing up. My point is that ANY kid of ANY age can be negatively (or positively) impacted by the home environment. I know this is a no brainer but I thought it was important to bring up so you can remember that as you decide what your next step is. Home life can often be so pervasive that it becomes difficult to overcome that.

    Another thought I had was this student is likely asserting his independence and testing the waters. He is watching to see how people react and handle his claims. This can be consciously manipulative or it can be subconscious method of trying to find himself.

    P.S. Mine was a disability issue, not a racism issue. The principles still apply.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 17, 2008
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 17, 2008

    Unfortunately, I can empathize with your situation. Until about a month ago, the race card had never been played in my classroom or towards me, although it has been used with other teachers at my school.

    This one day, I confiscated a (black) student's cell phone because I watched him send text messages for at least 30 seconds. Later in the period, another (hispanic) student's cell phone rang in his pocket, and he quickly turned off the phone without removing it from his pocket. To that student, I reminded him to turn off his phone before coming to class in the future, but I did not confiscate the phone.

    The first student loudly asked his neighbor why I didn't confiscate the other kid's phone, and then he stated that I was being racist. This comment prompted me to call the student over to my desk, where I told him to remain until the rest of the class had been dismissed. I then very firmly informed this student that I did not appreciate his comments, that they were inappropriate, unacceptable, and untrue, and that he was out of line for saying them. I explained how the two situations were different (text messaging versus an accidental ringing), and that I would have most definitely confiscated the other kid's phone had I observed him text messaging. During this conference, the student maintained a "huffy" sort of attitude. I ended up writing a referral for this student, mainly as a means of documenting the exchange to CMA.

    Later in the week, this student came to me after class and offered a heartfelt apology. Of course I accepted it and we moved on. This student is one of my best, most attentive students, and I really believe that he said what he did before he even realized what he was saying. It's sad that it happened that way, but I hope now that he will think twice before making those sorts of comments. Certainly sometimes it may be completely true that someone is acting racist towards him....but I don't act or think that way. I was truthfully very hurt by what he said because I really work so hard to maintain a safe classroom environment and I felt like his comment really poisoned it. To date I haven't heard any sort of similar comment from him, and I'm glad for that.

    As for the original poster's situation, he will need to assess the climate of his class. If he could confront the student head-on like I did, that seems to be a good method to consider, especially since it doesn't seem to be an overriding or pervasive problem among the rest of the students. If that doesn't work, addressing the issue as being one of generic insubordination, disrespect, and disruption should work. Those things are never tolerated, and they won't be tolerated simply because a student mentions race.
     
  13. TampaTeacher

    TampaTeacher Comrade

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    Feb 17, 2008

    I think he might know that the race card is a hot-button topic, so he's using it to get to you. I doubt he even believes you are racist. He might just be lashing out in a way he thinks can get you in trouble. Like the student of mine asked if he could get me fired by "getting lost" on a field trip. Nice.

    I'm no psychologist, but do you think this sort of behavior could be an attempt to assert power over the teacher in front of the other kids?

    Maybe you should not address the topic specifically right now. Just keep being fair to everybody and possibly incorporate more great African-American achievers in your lessons. Maybe doing so will just make him look absurd playing the race card - thus taking away his perceived power.
     
  14. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Feb 17, 2008

    I used to sub, briefly, at an alternative high school/juv. hall school. I was also called racist a few times. It couldn't be further from the truth, of course. Maybe they're just angry at their situation and just lashing out. Many have a horrible home life. I just ignored their comments and continued teaching them. Since I worked in different classrooms, some would be fine, others would be like this. I just had to ignore them and do my best. But, it doesn't feel good to be called a racist!
     
  15. eduk8r

    eduk8r Enthusiast

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    Firemaple, I think that your situation is different from any other, because you teach in a juvenile detention center. This kid's beliefs are probably a large part of what landed him there in the first place. So I don't think you can just pass it off without giving the boy a chance to form a new paradigm that leads to the idea that possibilities are open to him that he right now believes are not. I don't think simply saying that's not appropriate is going to change anything. Because of where he is, it seems like he really believes what he is saying. His beliefs are shaping his behavior and his reality; it's important to address that.
     
  16. firemaple

    firemaple Companion

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    Feb 17, 2008

    Thanks for everyone's responses. You all have offered great insight.

    I have spoken to other teachers there and they have said that other white teachers, especially male ones, are often called racist. I have learned it's a common practice by some students.

    Yes, I understand that their experiences with white men in authority, (police, judge, etc.) have not been good, even considering that they committed the crimes. Most of the boys I teach have had few positve experiences with white male authority figures. Blaming the "white man" for the stint in a juv. detention center is easier than accepting responsiblity.

    I'm really not sure what I'm going to do just yet. I have already been teaching about African American authors in my lesson plans. I'll continue doing that.

    I think the question is how can you overturn a boy's worldview that has been ingrained for 17 years?

    I like what someone said about just making a generic announcement about disruptions and not addressing the racism, except to say it is a disruption and discipline that ouburt as I would any other classroom disruption, is a good tact.

    I'll keep you guys posted and if you have any other thoughts, please share.

    To the person who asked what subject I teach...I teach English, grades 7-12.
     
  17. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Feb 18, 2008

    I guess the best way you can "overturn" their view of things is by being the opposite of what they expect. If they think white males (females as well) are racist and unfair, make sure they see you being fair to all and have the same high expectations for all. Kill them with kindness, but hold your ground. You really might want to check out Teaching with Love & Logic. Fay spent many years as a teacher and administrator in schools some might consider tough, though I don't know about juvi. He also works closely with Foster Cline. Cline is an adult and child psychiatrist, and he has worked a great deal with troubled children and adolesents including those in the prison/detention system. Take a look at what they call the Threat Cycle-basically cycle showing how power struggles spiral out of control and how to avoid them. It sounds like this young man feels he has no control over what happens in his life AT ALL and feels this is one way to try and get some measure of control. He may also be testing you to see how tough you are and how much he can bully you around (though I doubt he knows it consciously.) Fay, Funk, and Cline all help show how you can maintain classroom control by sharing it with the students thus lessening their need to act out. It's not perfect in every situation (no program is) but it may give you some new ideas and ways of looking at things. What you are doing is probably so much harder than I can imagine. These kids need loving firmness so badly. I'll keep you in my prayers.
     
  18. eduk8r

    eduk8r Enthusiast

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    Feb 18, 2008

    Great advice, Runsw/scissors. :)
     
  19. kburen

    kburen Cohort

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    Feb 18, 2008

    Good luck! My brother is a juv. probation officer and his cases are mostly black males and he's mentioned to me before they they often get angry at him just because, like you, he's a white male. I'm not sure how he deals with it to give you any advice, but I did want to wish you luck and let you know that it's not just you who deals with these type of issues!
     
  20. firemaple

    firemaple Companion

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    Feb 18, 2008

    Run/Scissors,

    Thanks so much for your input.

    I hope my initial post didn't come across as a teacher on the verge of a breakdown. I was on edge to be sure. I do try killing with kindness and will continue to do so. I love my job, even if this thread doesn't sound like it.

    Today all hell broke loose.

    The student came to class and immediately started ridiculing me, disrupting my class and was openly aggressive to the white students in the class.

    I followed our discipline policy, giving him a warning and then a second warning. He calmed down then. (Three warnings and you're removed from the class and it could result in time being added a student's sentence.)

    I gave a writing assignment and he turned his in with one sentence: "I hate you and your white butt." Only he didn't say "butt."

    I gave him his third warning and told the behaviour specialist to remove him from my class. (I followed protocol to a tee.)

    The student said he wasn't leaving and the staff member called for back up. After nine staff members, the student was finally removed from the class.

    He kept saying, "I hate white people," over and over again, among filth that I wouldn't dare repeat.

    He also made several physical threats towards me during this ordeal, saying, "I'm going to be your white ***"

    I just documented his tirade, writing down everything he was saying.

    Oh well, I said I would update you guys. Not the update I wanted to write.

    I think I'll request that he not be placed back in my class for the rest of the week to let him cool off, after all, he did make physical threats towards me.

    What do you guys think? I have his class again Wednesday and then again Thursday.
     
  21. firemaple

    firemaple Companion

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    Feb 18, 2008

    I guess it's weird because the rules are so different at a juv. detention center.

    In a regular high school a teacher is frowned upon for sending a child out of the class. Where I work, it's accepted as part of the job.

    My principal came to me after this incident and gave me an addaboy for the way I had handled the situation.

    I was actually being observed at the time. Someone from the district was there. I'm glad too. I told her before hand that she was about to observe a difficult class. She also complimented me on the way the situation was handled.
     
  22. eduk8r

    eduk8r Enthusiast

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    That sounds like a really, really upsetting and difficult day. I'm sorry you had to go through that. I'm glad your observation went well anyway, sounds like you deserved it! Like I said before, God bless you in your work. :)
     
  23. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Feb 19, 2008

    firemaple, I don't have any advice for you. Just wanted to :clap: you for working in an envirnoment most teachers would steer clear of. I'm glad that the boy was removed, and hopefully can take this time to cool his jets a bit. Happy to hear the observation went well!
     
  24. deedee

    deedee Connoisseur

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    Feb 19, 2008

    What about having book choices that deal with this topic? Then discuss race issues but through literature. They can expand thier world view through reading.
     
  25. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Feb 19, 2008

    I think good advice has been given already. The only thing I can add is next time it comes up, just yawn and tell the class you are very bored with that term - could they please get the dictionary and come up with something more interesting?

    Then when it is used again, to quote one of my favorite special needs friends, just say, "bow-wing!" and move on like you didn't hear it.

    I don't know. If they have any sense of humor, they might "get it" and you could diffuse the situation. If not, it might incite the situation.
     
  26. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

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    Feb 19, 2008

    Could you do an explicit lesson on racism, identity, and institutions?
     
  27. firemaple

    firemaple Companion

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    Feb 19, 2008

    Thanks for all the support.

    You guys offered up some good advice. I'm going to get the book running with scissors suggested. It sounds great.

    And I will try to think up some lesson plans that show racism through literature, only I have to do this so delicately.

    I won't see that student until Monday. He's been removed for the week to cool down.

    Thanks again. :)
     
  28. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Please include in your lessons the question "What can I do to foster peace and change racism?"

    I would like our young people to THINK about solutions, what can I DO, rather than play the blame game. It would be interesting to pick this kid's brain and find out what he thinks can be done about true racism. Accusing a non-racist of racism is in itself racism!

    Sometimes, just being a friend, or listening, or withholding judgment can lead to a relationship between races that will end racism between two people. But just calling names does not help bring understanding - it just adds fuel to a fire or builds a fire where there was no fire.
     
  29. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

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    Feb 19, 2008

    Of course, depending who you ask (including scholars), every white person is racist in the sense of white privilege (I was recently reading Gloria Anzaldua). Some of these arguments may seem to give ammunition to racist name-calling, since many students may not cognitively be able to step back, assess such claims, and investigate their meaning on a linguistic or philosophic level. Just thought I'd throw that in there.
     
  30. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    How can you be racist due to white privilege?

    Isn't racism a thing of the heart?
     
  31. MrL

    MrL Companion

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    Feb 19, 2008

    The explanation I read in ethnography is being willfully ignorant that certain things are indeed easier for you just for having white skin. Interactions with authority figures, for example.
     
  32. firemaple

    firemaple Companion

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    Feb 19, 2008


    True, there is an effort among some to redefine the word "racism" to include any white person, ala white priviledge. I haven't seen this movement widely accepted though.

    Any usage of "racism" by me on this thread was the traditional definition, which is discrimination based on one's skin color, and anyone -- white or black -- can be or cannot be racist under this view.

    True story: I was a journalist before I switched careers to become a teacher. Newsrooms have for the past ten years or so been trying to diversify (which is a good thing). I had an editor tell me point blank once: "You have two strikes against you, your white and a male."

    I didn't feel too priviledged that day. haha.

    (Btw, I ended up with a better reporting job. So it worked out.)
     
  33. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Feb 22, 2008

    I was thinking the same thing. What fun for this student to find some way to get under your skin! I'd treat it as a disrespectful disrupting remark and deal with it the same way I deal with those types of remarks. I wouldn't give "pulling the race card" any more attention than it deserves.
     
  34. wunderwhy

    wunderwhy Comrade

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    Feb 22, 2008

    My first year of teaching I encountered this test (I think all teachers go through this unless they teach in a homogeneous area). It was very upsetting to me, as I had come from a diverse area where I honestly grew up without thinking that there were "others" and "us" (I was the only girl with Christmas lights in my neighborhood, so I guess I had an unusual experience of being a minority in a country where I would have been the majority anywhere else). So then I arrived at a school in a rural area where kids had little Confederate flags sewn on their bookbags, and it was culture shock for me. Then my little seventh graders discussed my alleged racism in front of me for my benefit (over telling a group of students to stop talking over me).

    So I stewed about it for a weekend (in fact, it was over Thanksgiving break, so it was longer than that). Then I came back to school with a speech prepared. I explained that I was in fact no racist, because racism would be giving special treatment to one race over another. On the contrary, I was not going to allow one group to disrupt the class no matter what race they were. And I explained very sincerely how much I hated the thought of racism and how much it broke my heart. And I said that I felt they owed me an apology, and hoped they would give me one, and then moved on.

    And I think I got one and a half apologies, which, considering that this was a small group of seventh-graders, was a victory to me. It showed me that they didn't really think ill of me, and that I wasn't a meanie, and that they weren't heartless miscreants. They just knew this was something to say when they wanted to fight "the man" (or woman, in my case). And I was a new teacher, so when I disciplined, it wasn't with as much grace as I could have carried, and it didn't take much for a 12 year old to feel slighted and want to test the waters.

    Don't let it bother you. That's half the battle. Because sometimes it's just a test to see how you react, and if you pass, you won't hear it again. And sometimes it's a coping mechanism that might turn into a life strategy if not checked. I had a neighbor at my old condo (she was renting) who appeared to be a professional mooch. Type her name into the state court records website, and you'd get garnished wages, a charge of harrassing phone calls, and all sorts of unlawful detainers (I don't even know what those are). Her m.o. was obviously move someplace new, stop paying rent, hit up neighbors for hand-outs, and then cry racism if someone didn't oblige. No joke. At all hours of the day she would ask for rides, meals, etc., and if you said no, she'd point to her skin (literally) and ask if that was why. "Is this why??"

    And the thing is, the nice, normal, non-teachers fell for it! My husband included! Because it's really a fear to be discriminatory. It was the Vietnam Vet and I, the public school teacher, who told her to go shove it where the sun don't shine. And her response wasn't even that terrible when we refused -- I was yelled at worse by the idiot who pulled out in front of me and caused an accident last week. It was obviously simply a tool of manipulation, and an effective one at that. If it didn't work, she didn't follow up on it because she knew she didn't have a leg to stand on, but it worked so often and so well that I don't think that was really a concern for her. She called another neighbor for years to ask to go out together, inevitably to "forget" her wallet every time the bill came. And this neighbor kept accepting date after date, lest she be called a bigot!

    So what I'm saying is, in most cases, the accusation of racism is thoughtless/meaningless or just a little test to see how you'll react. Most kids are not as cunning as my old neighbor. The best thing you can do is carry on confidently no matter what they accuse you of. Once you win the trust/attention of the class, you can address comments like this, but sometimes you just have to let them bounce off of your or pretend you think they're funny to get there. At the very least, don't let them bother you. This isn't about logic, and this isn't about race really, either. It's about power, and it's about growing up, and it's about not having been taught to filter your thoughts and check yourself. Certainly in a juvenile center I'm sure that's pretty common.
     
  35. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Once I took a college course on Cultural Sensitivity and it was taught by a black woman. She said all languages are spoken. I had 2 interpreters sitting up front. When another student brought this up she said sign language wasn't a real language. Later I tried to bring her 3 research articles about sign language being proven to be a real lanuage. I never did convince her to at least be sensitive to the deaf culture when she made this statement. Needless to say, none of us trusted her enough to provide us with a real course and that's the sad part.
     
  36. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    What did you put on her evaluation? Her reaction could have been very interesting to watch.
     
  37. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I didn't write anything down unfortunately. I griped nonstop to the dean (whom I keep in touch with). He said he can't tell his teacherse not to have an opinion. If we was talking about gay people like that you would shut her down but she was just talking about deaf people's language..no biggie. I was pissed. It didn't go anywhere.
     
  38. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Feb 27, 2008

    Good heavens: I thought the "ASL isn't a language" canard had been laid to rest long before most of the people posting here were even born.
     
  39. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    I once gave a really poor review of a college professor I'd had for one of my education courses. Everyone else gave her satisfactory evals because we were young and some people were scared of her. I just laid everything on the table and gave her low ratings in every category. I made sure to explain myself. Since there had never really been any love between this person and myself she was able to figure out who was responsible for that evaluation. She was really ticked at me for the rest of the semester, but I didn't care at all.
     
  40. firemaple

    firemaple Companion

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    Feb 27, 2008

    Wunderwhy,

    Great advice. I'm so new and have so much to learn. This is my first year.

    I've learned more about this student since I last posted: His uncle died in prison and his father is currently serving life. Also, his mother was contacted and said there was nothing she could do with him, saying that one one temper tantrum he dented her car by kicking it.

    Most of the kids I teach have bad homes or have serious emotional problems, but this kid has it ten fold.

    I am starting a school newspaper at the school and have been asking all my classes for volunteers to step up and join the club. He raised his hand, which was surprising. I put his name on the list.
     
  41. Here2Learn

    Here2Learn Companion

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    Feb 27, 2008

    ugh....i hate the race card. my daughter is bi-racial (i'm white) and i think if she ever pulled that card i would just die. well, as far as class, it is black history month. not that you should try to prove anything to anyone, but it is something good for students to know about. i know when i was in school we did a ton of stuff when it was black history month, but now it seems like it's no big deal. anyway, maybe if you talked about some of the black inventors and their accomplishments, martin luther king, rosa parks, etc. and he saw what your views really are about black people then it would help. maybe it wouldn't, but it's something that needs to be discussed anyway so you aren't really losing out by trying it. i've heard of teachers doing a game where they seperate the kids into two groups and then treat one group better than the other (giving the chosen group a candy bar or something, letting them have lunch first, etc.) so they can experience what it felt like to be discriminated against. maybe you could do this and let the black students be the group that gets the good treatment. it would start a lot of discussion and then i would still give the kids who were left out a treat after it was over!
     

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