Quit My Toxic Student Teaching Placement...

Discussion in 'Student & Preservice Teachers' started by skyline, Jun 12, 2019.

  1. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Jul 24, 2019

    She's such a hateful, miserable person! Some of her own family members won't have anything to do with her. I unfortunately found out why. I never thought in a million years it could be that bad, and I'd have to worry about someone trying to take me out.
     
  2. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Aug 6, 2019

    Update:
    I start in my new placement soon. I'm getting nervous! I'm surprised how much anxiety I have as I get closer to it. So, I'm not in a good place mentally! I want to be positive, but there's so many worries after having such a bad experience, and I found out I have the same supervisor.
     
  3. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Aug 17, 2019

    You will work through this! Unfortunately, there isn’t anything you can do about your university supervisor, but I would like to think that the ST placement coordinator worked to put you in a better placement. Twenty years ago this fall, I did my student teaching. I was placed with two different teachers at the same time. I clicked with one and not the other. It’s had because to this day, I have never forgotten that negative experience. So, I understand where you’re coming from. Your worries are normal!!! You can do this! On a side note, 3 years later, I got Special Education Certification and had to student teach for just 6 weeks. I had an awesome CT and and awesome experience!
     
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  4. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Aug 18, 2019

    Thank you Emily! I appreciate you responding and the encouragement!

    It helps to hear how others' bad student teaching experiences worked out in the end. I'm sorry you had to go through that too, having a rough relationship with a CT. It's difficult to forget! I do worry that an unfinished student teaching placement will be a flaw on my record when I apply for jobs.

    I'm glad you had a great experience when you got your Special Education Certification. Did your bad experience make you anxious going into teaching? If so, did it get better quickly after you started your 1st teaching position? I keep telling myself that most CT's wouldn't treat another human like mine did me, so the odds are good I won't have to deal with that this time.

    The program advisor I think did a good job this time matching me with an experienced CT, who has successfully hosted other student teachers. So, I hope it goes much better this time! But, to be honest, I'm feeling a lot more anxious starting it then I did the 1st time. Hopefully, that goes away quickly once I start!
     
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  5. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    My ST supervisor only met with me maybe 2 or 3 times and came to observe me twice. I think if you can create a positive relationship with your CT and do well enough to "pass" student teaching you will be ok. If you have a positive experience with your CT hopefully she be a reference for you in the future when you are looking for a job.
     
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  6. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Aug 19, 2019

    Skyline, I don’t think my bad experience made me nervous about going into teaching in general. I don’t think I was anymore nervous going into that first position than any other first year teacher. I put the experience behind me as soon as I walked on that last day. My College thought I was good enough so I focused on that. I knew that if I ever had the chance to be a CT, I would be different than what I experienced. You’ll rock this experience! Once you get started, you’ll feel better. I believe that not every teacher can be a good CT. There’s such an emotional element to it. A good CT builds a student teacher up. You know, when I hot that first position, my first thought as I grabbed my lunch off the kitchen counter and headed for the door... “wow, I’ve never been paid to actually be in classroom, until now.”
     
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  7. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Aug 19, 2019

    I had a kind of weird student teaching experience also, but overall it was fine. My biggest advice is to be welcoming to feedback or advice, so that when the teacher has a suggestion they let you know rather than judge you as doing something "wrong" without helping you fix it. It could help to have a conversation right at the start, that was something along the lines of: "If you have any feedback or suggestions for how I can improve, I'm happy to hear it." It will help remove any awkwardness between the two of you if you make it clear that you are new and there to learn.

    Good luck!!
     
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  8. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Aug 21, 2019

    My supervisor is different than the others at my university (that's why no one wants to get her). She does unannounced observations. I noticed she came every other week (sometimes once a week; you don't know when), but it comes out to about 10-15 times (with the 2 scheduled evaluation meetings). The others only do 3-4 observations, and try to do the 2 scheduled evaluations on the days they observe, so it's more like 3-6. Mine will stay a whole half day too, which isn't typical either. It's not just with me. My classmates talked about her doing that with them too.

    It's unnerving since she rarely smiles and sits staring with a stern look. She's stood behind my shoulder while I sat and did a small group. One of my classmates said, she's afraid of our supervisor, if that gives you the idea of her general presence.

    There's more problems with it. For instance, she told me that she would have taught something anyway when I took something out of my lesson plan because my CT told me not to teach it. And, gave me a lecture about why it should be taught. I was always polite and agreed with her, but that didn't stop her to continue to lecture why it should be taught, and that I guess I should of done it even though my CT told me not to because it would confuse the kids. My supervisor didn't seem to get we're in someone else's room and can't just go rogue without our CT's approval. Talk about being put between a rock and hard place.
     
  9. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Aug 21, 2019

    I see your point about keeping in my mind my college thinks I'm good enough and to focus on that. The program head has told me that after the negative experience with my CT.

    :) I'll be thinking the same about getting paid! That will be a nice change.
     
  10. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Aug 21, 2019

    Thank you Otterpop for the advice and well wishes!

    I had that conversation with my ex-CT. I told her I was there to learn and was open and wanted feedback and suggestions, that I want to do a good job and not to be afraid to give me feedback. But, she had next to nothing to offer even when I asked outright about specific lessons both before and after I taught. It was obvious she didn't want to take the time. She didn't read my lesson plans. My supervisor was coming in for an evaluation and my CT realized my supervisor might ask her about my lesson plans (the copies I handed her that she threw away without looking at). She asked if I had more copies, so she could look at them. I couldn't believe it. Talk about covering your a___.

    Then, she went to my supervisor behind my back and complained about things she never mentioned to me. For instance, my supervisor told me my CT told her that she wished I was better with technology, but no one could tell me exactly what that means. From the little explanation I got out of my CT, she wanted me to use the document camera more. I'd use it for worksheets (she's a worksheet teacher), but when making a chart of classroom responses for instance, I'd use a large white board. What I came to realize is it's easy criticism for someone who is not in their 20's, because there's a stereotype that older people aren't as good with tech... My CT mentioned that one time. And, it made me look bad when she closed out my computer tabs before an observed hour block.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
  11. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 9, 2019

    Update:
    My supervisor showed up on the 2nd day of school unannounced. She brought up my past experience in front of people at my new placement. She asked about my health in front of my new CT, then later in direct earshot of the secretary and principal.
     
  12. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 10, 2019

    My supervisor was there for about 2 hours. I took the students and dropped them off at one point, and she was alone with my CT. When I returned, I walked into the room and my CT was saying, "I think she's doing a good job!" The atmosphere after I walked in was like walking into a room when someone is talking about a person and you can feel the nervous energy and silence. My supervisor then questioned me about my health in front of my CT (which I haven't spoken about with my CT). When my supervisor left, I went to the office with her to make copies, that's when my personal information (health, whether I have kids at home, etc..) was discussed in earshot of the secretary and principal. When I returned to my CT's classroom, my CT asked me, "Is everything okay?" I don't know why she asked that (unless my supervisor made it seem everything wasn't okay); I just walked into the room, had said nothing about any of it, so I didn't let on like things weren't okay.

    My CT then talked about keeping my lesson plans as proof, and I quote, "in case my supervisor comes back and says I didn't do everything I was supposed to do," which isn't common practice. I asked a former student teacher who did her placement at that school in the Spring. She said she never heard of such a thing. We already keep a file of our lesson plans in a portfolio and our university keeps them. We have to submit them to a digital database at the university, and I give a copy to my mentor and supervisor. My CT is speaking about keeping a file for my benefit to document in case my supervisor comes back and tries to fail me.

    What would you think if that happened to you? Would you report it to the program head?
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 10, 2019

    We are strongly advised to keep our lesson plans for (I think) three years in the event that we are ever questioned about what we did (or did not) cover. I don't think being asked to keep your plans throughout your placement is unreasonable. I would suggest keeping them until at least a few years into your teaching career to refer back to.

    I'm sorry that your health information was disclosed without your permission; I would follow up on this with your supervisor, explaining that you hadn't disclosed anything because it would have no impact on your placement. As far as questions about kids, etc, those are fairly typical getting-to-know-you questions, ones we typically ask as we are getting to know new staff. If you prefer not to answer, just say, "Thanks for asking, but I prefer to keep my life outside of school private."
     
  14. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 10, 2019

    Thanks for responding!
    This wasn't in the context of keeping my lesson plans as standard policy. I have to upload all my plans to my university and give copies to my CT and supervisor. My CT told me she would make a file in case my supervisor comes back and says I didn't do what I was supposed to do.

    I've known my supervisor for awhile now. She knows my general life story; how many kids, where I live, work history, etc... She asked me about my personal life in the context of ensuring I don't have any other obligations outside student teaching.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
  15. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 11, 2019

    I felt like it was a digging expedition for problems, which if my supervisor is concerned with anything about my personal life, she should have handled it privately with me. I'm an adult. We should not be having that conversation in front of the principal's open office door when he's sitting at his desk and the secretary is sitting a couple feet away at her desk.

    She can ask my CT how and what I've been doing without making out like I "might" be a problem student. My CT is happy with what I've been doing. She's given me positive feedback so far and told my supervisor that "I'm doing a good job," and I've been leading whole and small groups since day 2. There's no indication of problems, so why create problems.

    It would be like if you left a job due to issues out of your control, then you get a new job and someone from your old place goes to your new place and gives you the 3rd degree in front of your new co-workers and the principal, it wouldn't feel positive or supportive. It would feel like they're trying to cause problems by painting you in a negative light. It would be embarrassing and cause unnecessary anxiety. I think anyone would feel that way?
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
  16. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    It sounds like your CT will be helpful and as long as you do what you're supposed to do you'll get through this. How many weeks do you have?
     
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  17. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 11, 2019

    Yes, I think my CT is great, and I love seeing her teach! She has high expectations for her students yet is very approachable and down-to-earth. She uses data and makes differentiated instruction look easy. She's a great teacher and person. I'm so grateful to learn from her! I have 16 weeks.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  18. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 14, 2019

    Update:
    My supervisor showed up again and stayed for a couple hours. So, she came in unannounced on the 2nd day of school and less than a week later. She stayed for 2 hours this time. It stressed my CT out. She even said she's never seen a supervisor visit that often, and she's hosted many student teachers over the years.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  19. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 15, 2019

    So, here are the issues:
    1. My supervisor is observing me excessively, more so than other student teachers.
    2. She brought up my health in front of people at my placement.
    3. She brought up me having a parent with cancer in front of others.
    4. My CT is noticing this isn't typical.
    5. My supervisor has spoken to me in a disrespectful manner on a number of occasions, but never in front of others.
    6. She told me I have a couple weeks to figure everything out and start taking over, but the head just wants me to focus on doing the edTPA and taking over part of language arts at first. Then, I can take over more after I finish the edTPA. So, there is a discrepancy there already. I feel my supervisor is using her power to create an excessive workload as a means to harass me. Of course, I can't prove it, but I'm old enough and have enough life experience to know that is what is going on here. I have a degree in related to mental health, and I've worked in mental health. I'm well educated and trained to recognize such behavior.
    6. I have great reports from all my other teaching experiences other than the one I did in the Spring. I was supposed to graduate with honors. I have worked in education for years before going back to college and have great relationships with people at my jobs in schools. I tend to be well liked and respected. I've developed behavior management systems teacher have used in their classroom. I was contacted by my former employer this summer asking why I'm not applying for teaching jobs. They all knew I was supposed to finish my certification in the Spring. They all have seen me manage and teach classes on the job. I've been complimented on how well I work with students, so I know I'm not that bad. Anyone could have a medical emergency at any time that they have no control over and isn't their fault. Anyone can be placed in a toxic environment and it effect them when they typically do well.

    I'm trying to cope with this woman in a way that won't make problems worse. I can see how she can easily flip the script to make it seem that's not what is going on. For example, she's just really dedicated to ensuring her student teachers are doing well, so she's there to observe that much to help. She's just that giving and will go the extra mile (do more than the other supervisors). She makes sure she never speaks to me in the disrespectful and harsh tone in front of other people that she's used with me in private, and she doesn't put anything in writing that could be questioned. She asked me about my health, because she's truly concerned. She didn't realize they didn't know about it or they could hear or whatever. She never told me I have a couple weeks to figure things out and take everything over; I misunderstood. I've been there with her on things like that before, so I know that game. She has told me explicitly to do something a specific way to later act like she didn't.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  20. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Sep 15, 2019

    Are there other supervisors with your school? Could you call and possibly confidentially share your concerns and ask if you can have someone else observe you?

    This is a double edged sword through because there's also a chance that your supervisor could hear about it, they don't switch you to someone else, and things get worse for you.
     
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  21. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 15, 2019

    Hi, thanks for responding! Unfortunately, I'm at a very small college, so there's no one in the teacher education department that I can contact and be sure my concerns are confidential. I'm very worried about saying something and making it worse, that's why I don't know what to do other than document everything, hope for the best, try to cope with the excessive stress and workload this woman is creating, and wait and see.

    The only full-time professor in our small department is also the program head, academic counselor, hires and supervises the supervisors, and unfortunately, my supervisor does a lot of extras under the program head, so I don't know their relationship background. They could be related for all I know.

    I'm really struggling with this decision. It seems like any option has serious risks. If I say something, it could get worse. If I don't say something, it could gradually get worse and then it'd be too late to do anything about it. I want to be proactive, but I don't want to do something I'll regret.
     
  22. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Sep 15, 2019

    I do want to point out that it is illegal (a violation of HIPAA laws) to discuss your health situation with anyone other than you. I might have a copy of HIPAA violations and penalties and a highlighted section that references people who disclose information illegally. I might have such a copy paper clipped to a lawyer's business card. I might leave it on top of the lesson plans or whatever else the supervisor might see sitting there for so many hours. I might grab it quickly and say "oops, I didn't mean to leave that there" and put it away. OR I might consider contacting her supervisor or the college president and ask about their awareness of the legal situation that can arise when things like HIPAA violations are allowed to be unaddressed.
    This is a serious legal issue. Privacy is your right. I do believe that speaking with the college president, particularly, in a small college, might be fruitful for your change of supervisor, as well as protecting your classmates from future damage. Just a thought.
     
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  23. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I would simply put a tape recorder in plain sight, and make sure that she saw me turn it on when we "conferenced". If she asked why, I would simply state that I wanted to make sure I had all requirements and details at hand once she had left. "I like to listen again, at a less hectic time, to make sure your comments are clear."

    She will absolutely know why you want her voice giving you feedback or grief on record, but since you are using it in full view, with her knowledge, it will be almost impossible for her to refuse to be recorded without raising red flags with her superiors, so I am guessing that whatever is said/recorded will be something anyone qualified would judge to be reasonable. I would simply record everything, only turning it off when she is out the door. It may not solve all of your problems, but if it was small enough to be carried easily to earshot of principal/secretary, I would be on the tape suggesting that perhaps this is a less than ideal spot for that specific conversation, you know, because of privacy laws. Now you have shut it down, and gone on record as knowing that some conversations shouldn't be taking place in public places. You come off as someone who would concerned about the confidentiality of your student's information. The trick is to be consistent in using the recorder.
     
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  24. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 15, 2019

    I love that idea (it brings a big smile) and in a different situation I would love to do it! I want it to stop, and I want to protect others going through the program. But, I have to be careful not to become a martyr. I'm currently doing some research to see how she's connected to the university. What I found was interesting and probably explains why she's been allowed to behave this way and abuse others for years there. Her husband is a big time on the board. He's also been a superintendent for a couple local school districts and currently is on the local educational agency's payroll that oversees local school districts.
     
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  25. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 15, 2019

    That is a great idea! I wish I would of had that ready before she spewed my health and personal information all over the place there! It really pisses me off! And, I wish I was prepared and not nervous when she did that in earshot of everyone, so I could have shut her down. I feel she's jeopardizing not only me, but my family's future with insinuating I may not be a good hire due to health issues (which isn't true anyway). I'm going to be looking for a small recorder and practice my speech about why I'm using it.
     
  26. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    You can't undo the past, but you can learn from it and be ready for the future. That truly signals personal growth and understanding of the situation, with a plan for a different outcome going forward. Best of luck.
     
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  27. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 15, 2019

    That's very true! I'm a little disappointed, because I probably missed my opportunity to collect concrete proof of her speaking about my health. I think that's the most clear cut thing and would be a big enough deal to justify me getting a replacement.

    My problem is my mind goes blank after being observed, so even though I have things planned out I want to say, I don't feel in the proper state to execute them in a fool proof manner. To be honest, I had a panic attack when she brought up my health in the office and the principal was sitting there.

    If anything, I'm getting practice dealing with these types. It's just not something I wanted to deal with while still in the vulnerable role of student teacher.

    Thank you for the advice!
     
  28. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    We are vulnerable all through our lives. Just do what is needed to get through the student teaching successfully. If this can help, use it.
     
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  29. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    I think it's critical with the situation that I have concrete evidence. During her last visit, she told me I had a couple weeks and should be completely taking over the class. School just started, and I'm there for 16 weeks. This is not how it works. I was told by the program head that I needed to take over part of language arts only and focus on the edTPA, then after it's done is when I take over whole subjects. I have a timeline from the program head, and it's not that quick. My mentor hasn't even started full curriculum instruction yet, because they're assessing and have had to add more assessments to their list this year. Many things have changed including curriculum, the way the sped is executed, and the general organization and schedule. She doesn't even have a schedule yet.

    And, I don't understand why my supervisor thinks she can dictate what happens in my mentor's classroom without even asking her. My mentor and I have a plan and we're following guidelines. Honestly, I'm dealing with a weird situation that feels like gaslighting. There's also been incidents where she told me to do something, then acted like it didn't happen, that she really told me to do something else, or I misunderstood, which if I report, is what she'll say to get out of it. If I tell the program head she's telling me I have to take over in 2 weeks, she'll probably say she didn't say that, that I must have misunderstood. It's weird and is freaking me out to be honest!
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019 at 4:55 AM
  30. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Sep 15, 2019

    Do you live in a state where you can tape someone without their permission?
     
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  31. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    I have signed affidavits for videotaping in the classroom, so hopefully that will cover it. I'm supposed to be practicing taping before doing the edTPA anyway. I'll just make sure I tape when she's there. I'll tell her I'm videotaping. And, I don't live in a state where it's illegal, so should be double covered. I'll switch to my phone if I go out of range. I just want to ensure I don't forget anything and with my new medication and health issues I need either written or recorded notes.
     
  32. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Can you submit that plan and get it approved by someone? Later on, if your supervisor says "why haven't you taken full control of the classroom yet?" you can explain that your timeline is further elaborated in your approved student teaching plan.
     
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  33. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    I'm going to type up a copy and email it to everyone involved, including my supervisor and program head, who runs the program and is my supervisor's boss. I still have to make sure my mentor is still okay with what we discussed. The schedule isn't fully set, and there's questions about how subjects will be organized and assigned. I hope they get it figured out before my supervisor shows back up! When I send the plan, I'll explicitly ask the program head if she approves of the plan and hopefully get it in writing in the email. I don't think my supervisor can argue with that.
     
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  34. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 15, 2019

    Seriously, what she's asking with doing the edTPA and also completely taking over without building up to it is impossible anyway! I don't get it! I think it's a way to put pressure on me and push things to make them stressful.
     
  35. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 15, 2019

    I get what your saying about always being vulnerable. What I was saying is if I had a teaching license, union, and a contract, it would be less likely she could do as much damage to my career. Even if I lost my job, I'd still have my teaching license and could go look for another teaching job. As a student teacher, I'm more vulnerable under this kind of attack, because if she runs me out, I will be left holding nothing but a huge college bill and no license to get a job, and all that time and money wasted.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  36. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 17, 2019 at 4:47 AM

    It's a weird coincidence how many things I'm experiencing are on the Workplace Bullying Organization's list of early signs of bullying. In case others are dealing with something like that, I thought I'd share the link. It helps to give it a name and realize how I'm feeling is normal given the circumstances.
    https://www.workplacebullying.org/individuals/problem/early-signs/
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019 at 4:59 AM
  37. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Sep 17, 2019 at 7:21 PM

    I'm glad you gained a smile. However, no matter whose wife she may be, the law is the law. I'd recommend that you speak with the president of the college. "Hi, I'm dealing with a sticky situation, and I'd like your help. I have a supervisor who is married to one of the board, so I'm hoping that you can help me address something that could ultimately prove to be a liability to the college/university. I'm sure she doesn't realize that HIPAA protects a person's health information, and she has violated the protocols and laws by sharing my information openly with others, and without my permission. Can you help me? I really want to settle this professionally. I'm thinking that she may feel more comfortable supervising someone other than me, given that she has erred to such a degree. I'd be willing to forgive her and drop it, but it would be easier to let go of the issue if I weren't faced with her every day." Something along those lines might do the trick.
     
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  38. skyline

    skyline Companion

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    Sep 18, 2019 at 4:21 AM

    Hi Joyful, thank you for responding with advice on dealing with what is central to why I'm worried about this woman! I'm afraid, and I think with good reason, of her doing damage to my career. But, I'm not sure if what I have is enough for her to be in violation of the law? I'm sorry this is long. If you have time, I'd love to hear your thoughts on it.

    This is what I have with her publicly speaking about my health and personal information:
    Last semester, a classmate told me during a college class that our supervisor told her about me "being sick." My classmate told me this while we were working in a group. I changed the subject not wanting to go into details in front of people in class. I haven't seen her since then, so I don't know the exact details of what was said. My classmate has graduated, so I no longer see her in class, but I could try to look up her email in the university database and contact her.

    A couple weeks ago when my supervisor was alone with my new CT and I returned to the classroom from dropping students off, it was obvious my supervisor had told my CT about my last placement. I can infer that much from what was said. She also asked me in front of my CT, "how's my health now?" I had not told anyone at my new placement about my health or my last placement issues. I curbed the question and answered that it's been taken care of now. I offered no details.

    That same day, she brought it up again when we were standing outside the doors of the offices at my placement. The principal and secretary were sitting at their desks, and we were outside their doors within earshot of them. I think she was trying to figure out my diagnosis (which is a chronic disease and I had a couple other acute problems that were found and treated late spring into the summer). She continued to question me about how my health is, about the health of my parents, and if I have children living at home. Each time I refused to give details. The head of the program knows, but I don't know what was shared with my supervisor. Last semester, she knew my symptoms and saw my doctor's slips where they wrote me off, but they were just starting the exploratory phase of figuring out what was wrong with me. So, I had symptoms without a diagnosis at that point.

    I absolutely feel violated, but I'm not sure if that is enough for someone to be in violation of the law? If anything, she insinuated that I'm unhealthy and now it's a mystery, which could easily cause that school district to look the other way when my resume comes across their desk.

    Thank you for the help and reading all this!
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2019 at 7:28 AM
  39. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Sep 18, 2019 at 1:14 PM

    I may be thinking cynically, but I think you should not rock the boat and just get through this teaching experience with as little drama as possible. It will mean continuing to ignore whatever nasty stuff this supervisor sends your way. It seems that your teacher mentor likes what you are doing and seems to see what the supervisor is trying to pull. Keep the teacher on your good side, work hard to be successful...and then look upon this experience when you are finished with a sigh of relief!
     
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  40. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Sep 18, 2019 at 11:30 PM

    Yes! Just do your best to make it through. Once you're done with the program, you'll have much more autonomy when deciding where you'll work and who you'll work for.

    It sucks and your complaints are valid. If your ultimate goal, though, is making it through, you might have to try to ignore or block out this person and try to appease her whims and demands. It will probably be easier than trying to fight her. That sounds like more stress, and may make your student teaching experience last even longer.
     
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