Quickest route to full time teacher

Discussion in 'General Education' started by substitute_stev, Nov 14, 2020.

  1. substitute_stev

    substitute_stev Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 14, 2020

    Hi,
    I've been a substitute and a full time PE teacher. (I'm currently working as a substitute).
    Due to having only a BA in Social Science, obtaining a full time teaching position is difficult.
    By the way, I do not recommend getting a "general" bachelors' degree as it will make your pathway to teaching cumbersome.

    1.)Does anyone know how to become a full time teacher in the most efficient way?

    2.)Which grade level is in demand?
    At this point I can and will teach anything to land a full time position.

    Thank you.
     
  2.  
  3. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,890
    Likes Received:
    1,393

    Nov 14, 2020

    Possibly a MAT degree would work.

    In my school, we have the most trouble finding math and English teachers. Fortunately we don't have positions come open all that often.
     
  4. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Groupie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2013
    Messages:
    1,445
    Likes Received:
    325

    Nov 14, 2020

    Check with your state and see what credentials you need. Highest demand will always be math and science. Areas of greatest need are inner-city school systems.
     
  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,294
    Likes Received:
    2,809

    Nov 17, 2020

    OP, a great deal depends on what state you are in, because the pathways to teaching vary so greatly.
     
    Caesar753 likes this.
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,712

    Nov 20, 2020

    This is what I was going to say.

    Some states and districts offer ARL (alternative route to licensure) opportunities. My previous district had a program for people who already had non-education degrees. I know several people who did it. Quick and fairly painless.
     
  7. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2009
    Messages:
    1,480
    Likes Received:
    59

    Nov 27, 2020 at 8:33 PM

    Working as a sub is a good way. I would say that you want to focus on the level you're interested in, and then (as a sub) work there. I worked as a sub MANY years before I landed a job. This helped build the skills I needed. The key factor for me was the pound the pavement during the hiring season, hand delivering resumes. The online application process, I was like 0/1000. With hand-delivering (even though the job listings said don't do it), I was about 1/10 or so.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. TnKinder,
  2. waterfall
Total: 228 (members: 3, guests: 199, robots: 26)
test