Questions.

Discussion in 'Montessori Archives' started by Beanamania, Jul 20, 2006.

  1. Beanamania

    Beanamania New Member

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    Jul 20, 2006

    I'm a bit clueless and am in need of lots of information. I am considering becoming a Montessori teacher. Here are my reasons:

    1.) I have a two year old daughter who inspires me to do so.
    2.) My younger brother was in Montessori school until he was around age 8, and I was extremely impressed with his experience there.
    3.) I have a desire to do something for a living that will make a genuine contribution to society and the world. (Too Hallmark Greeting Card? Sorry.)

    The problem is, I'm a little confused about what, exactly, is required of a person to become a Montessori teacher. I do not have a bachelor's degree, though from what I've read, earning one before entering training seems to be the way to go. Though I realize that a Montessori teacher's salary isn't the most extravagant, I would like to reach my full earning potential, as I hope to someday have more children and be fully capable of providing for them by myself, if necessary. Or if, God forbid, something were to happen to my husband and I ended up caring for my child or children by myself, would I not earn enough to survive on a Montessori teacher's salary?

    Also, I've had trouble locating any schools locally that offer Montessori training. I live in Washington state, right outside of Seattle. Any help you can offer would be a huge help. I know it's a pretty broad question and I apologize. Thanks again.
     
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  3. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

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    Jul 20, 2006

    Hi! Your reasons for wanting to go into Montessori sound so much like mine when I started out. It really is a way to make a difference. When the child learns self-reliance, the ability to concentrate, and has the skills (coordination) needed to act confidently, she can participate and contribute to society in a meaningful way both for herself and in relation to all living beings. It fits right in with all kinds of sappy sentimental feelings! It is also a particularly satisfying career, as it includes professional growth and many avenues to explore (upward mobility).
    http://ami.edu/usa/welcome.html
    AMI requires a bachelor degree. IMO, this helps especially in psychology, education, or anthropology. I had an Anthropology degree when I found my way to Montessori ed. I found this training institute in Portland. http://www.montessori-nw.org/ Isn't there one in WA? I have a friend with a children's house near you, I will get her contact info for you if you are interested. She is AMI, it is a beautiful home/farm school. My brother also lives near you, in Glacier!


    I would love to talk to you more about this, but I don't have alot of time right now. We are off to the pool! Take care.
     
  4. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    Jul 20, 2006

    Here is a link to Montessori training centers in the Pacific Northwest.

    http://www.pnma.org/www/schools.htm

    I highly suggest that you try to get a job in a montessori school as an assistant before going for training. You will gain experience and will become familiar with the materials.


    At my school, your pay is determined by you education, certifications, and experience. Our school tries to pay us at least 90 percent of the local public school montessori.

    Pay raises are yearly and depending on the budget usually only 3 percent per year.

    I already had a bachelor's degree when I went for training, but I was able to earn credits toward a Master's degree. My training center was associated with a university.
     

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