Questions about IEPs for teachers of students with disabilities

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Matt234, Apr 10, 2015.

  1. Matt234

    Matt234 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 10, 2015

    Hello everyone, this is my first thread here. I'm currently working towards getting my teaching certification at the adolescent level and I'm currently doing some research on the IEP process. I was hoping some teachers of students with disabilities might be able to fill me in on some questions I have about the nuts and bolts of the IEP process and your experiences:


    1.) What would you say the level of parental involvement is when it comes to the IEP, does it really all vary case to case or are parents generally very active in wanting to be kept in the loop?

    2.) What happens if the student with a particular IEP performs much better than the goals set in the IEP, are any minor changes made?

    3.) On the opposite side of the spectrum, if a student under performs in regards to the goals set in the IEP, what sort of immediate work would this entail on behalf of the teacher?

    4.) Generally speaking, to what extent does the IEP grasp the content in the general education curriculum for your particular subject?

    5.) From what I've read, IEPs can be re-evaluated on an annual basis, do you think this is too frequent or not frequent enough?

    6.) What sort of situations have provided the most challenging obstacles when it comes to getting students with IEPs to meet their goals?

    7.) The information I'm getting is rather vague about how extensive or detailed an IEP should be, but for those of you that have been involved in contributing to an IEP, how extensive/detailed do they tend to be?

    Thank you all who have time to share your experiences!
     
  2.  
  3. lovesherald

    lovesherald Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2015
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    1

    Apr 13, 2015

    1) It varies depending on the county/school socioeconomic status, etc.
    Parents do lean on your expertise for finding deficits and making goals.

    2) You should test them prior to making goals. But if they do well, you can make an addendum to the IEP.

    3) If they do not make a goal after a year, you keep the goal and decide what to do differently.

    4) IEPs should be about what skills the student is lacking. Not necessarily common core goals/on grade level.

    5) Annually is just right!

    6) Obstacles: when kids aren't making progress despite changing programs/instruction, etc.

    7) You have to make a goal for one whole year and it needs to be something you can measure.

    Example:

    Given 10 words from current reading intervention, Johnny will correctly segment and blend 9/10 words for 3 consecutive sessions every 9 weeks until mastery by 4/1/15.

    OR

    Given 5 words from current reading intervention, Annie will identify initial, medial, and final phonemes for 5/5 words and manipulate one phoneme, giving the new word for 4/5 words for 3 consecutive sessions every 9 weeks until mastery 4/1/15.
     
  4. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2013
    Messages:
    569
    Likes Received:
    75

    Apr 13, 2015

    Question and answers about IEPs ...

    1.) What would you say the level of parental involvement is when it comes to the IEP, does it really all vary case to case or are parents generally very active in wanting to be kept in the loop?

    I wish I could say every parent is actively involved. Unfortunately, this is a not the case and I think it varies case by case.

    2.) What happens if the student with a particular IEP performs much better than the goals set in the IEP, are any minor changes made?

    We celebrate, and adjust. Amendments can be made any time. This is the students right.

    3.) On the opposite side of the spectrum, if a student under performs in regards to the goals set in the IEP, what sort of immediate work would this entail on behalf of the teacher?

    In my experience if a student under performs we keep the same goal and assess areas that seem to be hindering the completion of the goal.

    4.) Generally speaking, to what extent does the IEP grasp the content in the general education curriculum for your particular subject?

    Modifications and accommodations that indicated in the IEP often focus on general Ed classes. For example extra time on a test, the use of a calculator or notes. Narrowing down the assignment or giving extra time are examples of these.

    5.) From what I've read, IEPs can be re-evaluated on an annual basis, do you think this is too frequent or not frequent enough?

    Again I think this varies based on students. For some students this is just enough, others this is not enough. Some students need some intense one on one therapy. As a teacher it's incredibly challenging to provide the level of support all students need....all the time.

    6.) What sort of situations have provided the most challenging obstacles when it comes to getting students with IEPs to meet their goals?

    Sometimes IEPs can be pretty intense. I have sat in on some where the family brought a lawyer. (Which is their right) it can be intimidating. I think for me the hardest IEP I have ever sat through was dealing with parents who were still coming to terms with their special needs student. This is a challenging thing for parents to accept. No one expects a disabled child...and it literally rocks the parents world when they receive such a surprise. In regard to students meeting goals..I think it's a challenge when there is little follow through at home or even in school, teachers who work on special day classes or in sped classes I general have a ton on their plates. Providing the level of support to every student all the time is a daunting task.

    7.) The information I'm getting is rather vague about how extensive or detailed an IEP should be, but for those of you that have been involved in contributing to an IEP, how extensive/detailed do they tend to be?

    I typically try to remember these 3 rules:
    RULE #1 goals need to be observable and measurable
    Rule #2 goals need to be practical and realistic (taking into consideration the challenges students face daily) for example it is u realistic or practical to set a goal for a student who relies on a wheelchair to be able to run a mile in pe.
    Rule #3 the long term goal is for students to be as independent as possible...how will this goal help them get there?

    I have set academic goals, socialization goals, personal care and hygiene goals, and self advocacy goals.


    Thank you all who have time to share your experiences![/QUOTE]
     
  5. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Apr 14, 2015

    Hope this has helped!
     
  6. Tutor

    Tutor Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    2

    Apr 14, 2015

    1.) What would you say the level of parental involvement is when it comes to the IEP, does it really all vary case to case or are parents generally very active in wanting to be kept in the loop? Most just come in and look at the IEP when it is presented and have no additions. As a parent, I wanted mine before the meeting.

    2.) What happens if the student with a particular IEP performs much better than the goals set in the IEP, are any minor changes made?Never had it happen, but if it did, I would amend the goal

    3.) On the opposite side of the spectrum, if a student under performs in regards to the goals set in the IEP, what sort of immediate work would this entail on behalf of the teacher?It is a goal, we all work towards it

    4.) Generally speaking, to what extent does the IEP grasp the content in the general education curriculum for your particular subject? I write my goals with common core in mind.

    5.) From what I've read, IEPs can be re-evaluated on an annual basis, do you think this is too frequent or not frequent enough?Most of mine are due in spring, I like to meet with parents in fall as well

    6.) What sort of situations have provided the most challenging obstacles when it comes to getting students with IEPs to meet their goals?Time, there isn't enough time in the day to teach the student what they need to know. It is always a challenge to give them the skills they are lacking while the gen ed is moving on

    7.) The information I'm getting is rather vague about how extensive or detailed an IEP should be, but for those of you that have been involved in contributing to an IEP, how extensive/detailed do they tend to be?Depends on the district. The district I work for and my sped director wants it to be detailed. The district my son went to, not so much.
     
  7. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    6,040
    Likes Received:
    904

    Apr 14, 2015

    1. Depends on your population, IMO (of course there are exceptions to the stereotypes). I teach in a low SES, mostly minority area. We have a hard time getting parents in. Most that do come in are just grateful for the help their child is getting and don't question anything/speak up much during the meeting.
    Meanwhile, my friends teaching in wealthy districts can have 5 hour IEP meetings with parents nitpicking every little thing.
    2. I write an amendment with new goals.
    3. If the student is making no/very little progress, of course I have to change my instruction. I have to add more hours to the IEP. If we have documented many different interventions/strategies, increased hours, decreased group size, etc and the the student still doesn't progress, we refer them to a moderate needs program.
    4. Depends on the student's ability- I don't write goals that are unrealistic just so I can align with grade level standards. Most of my students need to work on below grade level skills.
    5. I think one year is adequate, providing you're problem solving as issues come up throughout the year.
    6. Getting gen ed teachers to work towards the student's level in class/make accommodations is the hardest part of the job for me. A close second is having too many students/not enough time to feel like I'm individualizing as much as I should.
    7. Depends on the district guidelines. IEPs in my current district are less detailed than in my first district. Everyone seems to do things a little differently.
     
  8. ca_sped

    ca_sped Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2013
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    6

    Apr 14, 2015

    I teach a self contained moderate-severe autism class, so my answer may be different that resource or mild-moderate teachers.

    1.) What would you say the level of parental involvement is when it comes to the IEP, does it really all vary case to case or are parents generally very active in wanting to be kept in the loop? It depends on the parent. Some parents want the draft IEP 5 days in advance and come to the meeting with notes and questions, other parents couldn't care less and are happy to sign whatever I have at the meeting. I do try to email all of my parents in advance of the IEP and ask if there are specific things they are concerned about or specific goals they would like to see

    2.) What happens if the student with a particular IEP performs much better than the goals set in the IEP, are any minor changes made? I will either do an amendment to change the goal or move to to the next logical step and continue to monitor progress on the original goal, depending on the student.

    3.) On the opposite side of the spectrum, if a student under performs in regards to the goals set in the IEP, what sort of immediate work would this entail on behalf of the teacher? I would look at the level of support I am providing regarding the interventions needed to meet the goal. Are the means of teaching, engagement, or response not meeting the students needs? Is the student able to understand the actual question?

    4.) Generally speaking, to what extent does the IEP grasp the content in the general education curriculum for your particular subject? Unless it is a vocational or social goal, all of my IEP goals are aligned with Common Core Standards. I use backwards designed lesson plans so IEP goals are the first thing I focus on and the curriculum/content is the means to work on the IEP goal.

    5.) From what I've read, IEPs can be re-evaluated on an annual basis, do you think this is too frequent or not frequent enough? Annual is good enough. We do report cards three times a year with IEP objective updates and I also do progress reports three times a year.

    6.) What sort of situations have provided the most challenging obstacles when it comes to getting students with IEPs to meet their goals? Most of my challenges come if a student transfers into my class with an IEP objective written to support what the previous teacher did in her class. For example "xxx will move their schedule icon before each transition." This is a bad goal because I don't use schedule icons in my classroom. Or "xxx will answer five comprehension questions about a reading by choosing from a field of three written answers with pictorial supports." This goal was written with the Unique Learning System curriculum in mind. Fortunately I am piloting it, but I would have been making my own weekly multiple choice tests about a topic if I hadn't had it available.

    7.) The information I'm getting is rather vague about how extensive or detailed an IEP should be, but for those of you that have been involved in contributing to an IEP, how extensive/detailed do they tend to be? I think and IEP needs to be detailed enough that if you got hit by a bus tomorrow, the incoming teacher could come in, read the IEP, and know what the student can and can't do and what supports they need to be successful.

    Good luck! I think writing the IEP is actually the easiest part of the job. Implementing it is a whole 'nother story!
     
  9. Mrsmeltzer

    Mrsmeltzer New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2015
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 18, 2015

    1.) What would you say the level of parental involvement is when it comes to the IEP, does it really all vary case to case or are parents generally very active in wanting to be kept in the loop?

    Parents are people and the trick is to know your parent's learning style. Different parents need different approaches to make the most of their involvement.

    2.) What happens if the student with a particular IEP performs much better than the goals set in the IEP, are any minor changes made?

    Celebrate and create new goals.

    3.) On the opposite side of the spectrum, if a student under performs in regards to the goals set in the IEP, what sort of immediate work would this entail on behalf of the teacher?

    Lots of conversation and collaboration. Have a meeting and talk about it.

    4.) Generally speaking, to what extent does the IEP grasp the content in the general education curriculum for your particular subject?

    This is often dependent on the Special Educator and General Educator's ability to see what is expected and what barriers exist.

    5.) From what I've read, IEPs can be re-evaluated on an annual basis, do you think this is too frequent or not frequent enough?

    IEP's must be reviewed annually. You can meet as a team anytime you want or need to. As you get better at aligning goals to curriculum and can reasonably pace objectives, annual works. of course, you just never know.

    6.) What sort of situations have provided the most challenging obstacles when it comes to getting students with IEPs to meet their goals?

    Low expectations.

    7.) The information I'm getting is rather vague about how extensive or detailed an IEP should be, but for those of you that have been involved in contributing to an IEP, how extensive/detailed do they tend to be?

    Your contributions, when data based, and written in parent friendly language should make sense to everybody and not need a rocket surgeon to interpret.

    Thank you all who have time to share your experiences!
     
  10. spedalong

    spedalong Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2015
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 22, 2015

    1.) What would you say the level of parental involvement is when it comes to the IEP, does it really all vary case to case or are parents generally very active in wanting to be kept in the loop?

    Parents often feel very intimidated by schools and should be encouraged by staff for their input. They are an invaluable resource into the child by instinct and certainly the most motivated in what is best for the child. By law, parental concerns must be listed in the present level of the IEP with a statement as to how they are being addressed in the IEP or giving reasons for any of their concerns being refused. In addition, a refusal automatically generates the need for a notice of action form. A parent who partners with the school in achieving the goals on an IEP is a rare jewel indeed. I have sat with parents who resented coming to a meeting and those who more or less, conducted the meeting. These people have more on their plate than I can even imagine and need so much encouragement and support.

    2.) What happens if the student with a particular IEP performs much better than the goals set in the IEP, are any minor changes made?
    I have received IEPs that had goals that were inappropriate for the child in terms of difficulty or addressed issues that were not present at the time (such as behavioral). These called for a new IEP meeting and amendments.
    3.) On the opposite side of the spectrum, if a student under performs in regards to the goals set in the IEP, what sort of immediate work would this entail on behalf of the teacher?
    Again, another meeting and amendments are in order. I have also amended the IEP for students whose health issues, such as seizures, have forced us to change ways of their accessing transportation. Some schools do not think that is necessary, but failing to include those changes to the IEP becomes a libelous situation if the bus staff fails to follow the new orders.

    4.) Generally speaking, to what extent does the IEP grasp the content in the general education curriculum for your particular subject?
    The IEP should list accommodations for the student to participate in general education. Modifications for the content may also be in there.

    5.) From what I've read, IEPs can be re-evaluated on an annual basis, do you think this is too frequent or not frequent enough?
    I believe that re-evaluation is an ongoing process from the initial date of the IEP. Data should be taken on the student's progress on goals throughout the duration and reported as often as the IEP team determines. A review can be called at any time if a member of the team thinks it is necessary. It is usually the intention of the team that an IEP will be suitable for the entire year.

    6.) What sort of situations have provided the most challenging obstacles when it comes to getting students with IEPs to meet their goals?
    Health issues including medication changes are a big one in my area of teaching, SDD. Too little attention by staff to the fulfillment of the IEP and the school's focus on paperwork is another major obstacle. Major disturbances within a child's family can really disrupt progress as well as a family that is continually moving from one school to another.

    7.) The information I'm getting is rather vague about how extensive or detailed an IEP should be, but for those of you that have been involved in contributing to an IEP, how extensive/detailed do they tend to be?

    The present level must contain certain information by law. Goals and benchmarks must be written so that their completion can be recognized by criteria that includes a number, a measurable indication. I think it is common sense to include medical conditions and procedures for a student to stay at school. I have mentioned transportation issues. The outline of an IEP gives all that must be included and considered in the document.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Chris Lee,
  2. miss-m
Total: 302 (members: 3, guests: 268, robots: 31)
test