Question for teachers in private schools

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ted, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Oct 6, 2013

    Good morning all and happy Saturday! :)

    I wanted to ask teachers who are in private schools:

    Is there any type of pension/retirement plan of which you are part? Or do you pay into social security? Or both?

    Also, how are salaries of private schools comparable to public schools? I've heard that often the salary difference is quite noticeable.

    I find myself getting disenchanted with the public education system (especially with the advent of Common Core), so I thought I would ask actual private school teachers some questions. :)

    Thanks in advance! :)
     
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  3. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

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    Oct 6, 2013

    If you are looking at private schools to escape Common Core, don't apply at mine! We have implemented it in all core subjects this year .
    But yes, we have a pension plan, we also
    pay into Social Security.
    My salary is a lot lower than what I would make in a Public school, but since every private school is different , you might want to investigate those in your area before you change employers.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 6, 2013

    I've been in the same Catholic high school since we opened in 1987, with the exception of the 5 years I spent home with my kids. My husband teaches in another Catholic high school run by the same religious order.

    Yes, we have a retirement plan. And, yes, we pay into Social Security.

    To get our salary scale, they average 10 local school districts. So we're lower than some, but higher than others. I can PM you more specifics on salary.

    We do NOT follow Common Core; nor do our kid take NY Regents exams. We submitted proof that our final exams are more rigorous than Regents, and as a result were able to opt out.

    Read my posts from over the years. I LOVE my job. I love the fact that I'm treated as a professional. I love the little perks-- the coffee, tea, bagels, and cakes that are provided in the faculty room each morning. I LOVE that each class starts with a prayer, and that the entire school stops dead in its tracks at noon each day to pray the Angelus. I love that the biggest behavior problems I have are the occasional chatty class. I love that when we're asked to stay for parent meetings, dinner is provided. (I mean a NICE dinner. The last time, it was salad with strawberries and walnuts, sliced steak, pasta alfredo, asparagus, mashed potatoes, probably one or 2 other things, and apple crisp and/or chocolate mousse for dessert. Served by the kids in one of the service organization, on real plates with linen napkins. Far more civilized than what I would have grabbed at home.) I'm incredibly happy with my job.

    As with public schools, each private schools is different from all others.

    But when I returned to teaching after my years at home, I turned down offers in order to return to my old school.

    PS-- TEd, if you want to change your privacy settings to accept PMs, I'll be happy to be more specific.
     
  5. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Oct 6, 2013

    Private school salaries and benefits vary greatly from one school to another depending on who they are owned by. I have a retirement plan which is almost as good as the public school plan. Like all employees, I pay into Social Security. My salary is over double of what I made in public schools when I left over 15 years ago. It is about 90% of what public school teachers make with the same experience and education.
     
  6. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Oct 6, 2013

    Thank you all very much for the thorough explanations and details.

    If I went to a private school, I would most likely apply to a Christian school, one that is aligned with my own values.

    I may at least start investigating my options. My fear would be resigning from public schools and then NOT get a job in a private school. :)

    P.S. Alice, you should be able to PM me now...thanks for the offer!
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 6, 2013

    Nope, for some reason I can't. I got your friend request, and accepted it. But I think somewhere in there, you have "accept Private messages" unchecked.
     
  8. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Oct 6, 2013

    I am at a Lutheran school. Our pay is lower than it would be at a public school, but we have pretty good benefits, including a retirement savings plan. We also pay into S.S. Because in our denomination teachers are considered 'called ministers', we have some tax exemptions (we can get a housing allowance taken out before taxes), but then we technically pay our own S.S. as self-employment tax.

    Our school chose to become state accredited about 8 years ago, which means we take the state tests and are moving to common core. However, there is not a lot of pressure on us--our principal views the state tests as just one piece of data, and we definitely do not "teach to the test" or spend a lot of time worrying about it. Our students in general do very well on it.

    I love the community we have at our school; it's really parents, teachers, and students working together. Our faculty is truly like a family. On the down side, we don't have a ton of resources, especially in regards to students with special needs. There is only 1 teacher per grade, so there is no help or teamwork in planning, etc.

    All in all, I love my school and am so happy to have spent the last seven years here!
     
  9. muinteoir

    muinteoir Companion

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    I moved to an independent school this year. It was the best move I could make. I have complete control over every thing in my classroom. The state and the feds have absolutely NOTHING to do with any part of our school.

    I pay into an annuity and social security.

    I make less than I would in a public school in base salary, but matching contributions to the annuity and merit pay bonuses at the end of the year make it comparable. I have over 30 years in public schools, so I was at the top of the pay scale. The teacher next door is very young and she told me she makes a little more than she would in public school.

    People who have been at my school for several years would take a cut in pay to go to public school.

    The real story though, is that I get to teach. Period. Not one second of my class will be taken up by standardized testing this year. It's amazing.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I loved everything about being in a private Catholic school...but I doubled my salary when I went public, was afforded rich and meaningful PD, and as a result was able to interact with, learn from and share with a larger, more diverse teacher population. I have no fear of CCSS or standardized testing.
     
  11. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    I truly appreciate all of your insights - both the pros and the cons. :)

    At age 46, I probably am stuck where I am...not sure any private school would hire an old dog. ;)

    But at least I'm getting more information...and I have you all to thank for that. :)
     
  12. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I would highly recommend keeping your public school teaching job until you get a private school job. Not only is smart financially, but it also makes you more marketable. If in June you walk in and interview for a 4th grade teaching job, and weeks ago, you were a 4h grade teacher in a public school, private schools are very interested in you. However, if you walk in June and you've been subbing for a year and you taught years ago, you aren't as marketable. Sure a good interview could still land you the job, but it is the more difficult route to go.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 7, 2013

    For what it's worth, we frequently hire experienced teachers.

    This year's crop of new teachers all happen to be fairly young. But we've hired people in their 40's and 50's in the past... some brand new to teaching, some with lots of experience.

    It's a matter of finding the right person for the job.

    Why not send out some resumes and see what happens?
     
  14. muinteoir

    muinteoir Companion

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    I don't know about that. I was 54 when I was hired this summer. The school hired another teacher who is close to 60.

    We both retired from tne public system and moved over.

    ....When is devided that I wanted to moved to independent, I bookmarked the jobs pages of the three schools I was most interestd in. I checked them every night. It only took a minute. But, when the perfect job opened up at my top choice school, I had my letter of intent in within minutes. I was hired soon after.

    It's worth a shot.
     
  15. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    VERY good advice; thank you for it! :)

    I guess I thought that I couldn't do that...that I would HAVE to quit my current job before interviewing for another? I thought that applying while I was still under contract could endanger my credential (at least here in California).

    I may be wrong on both accounts. :)
     
  16. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    I may do just that...thank you, Alice. :)

    I'm definitely going to pray on it, that's certain!
     
  17. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Oct 7, 2013

    Thanks for your advice!

    I hadn't thought to retire from the public system. But perhaps I'm too young to do that. I should check into ALL my options.
     
  18. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    Oct 7, 2013

    I taught at a private christian school the past two years. We did not get offered insurance, the pay was much lower also..... we payed into social security, not into any retirement fund.

    I did love the work atmosphere, I had great administration, friendly staff, good kids, small classes.

    I recently moved to a public STEM school in a big city, my pay went up by about $18,000.... obviously a massive increase. I have a pretty high workload at my new school compared to when I was at a private school, but still a good work atmosphere.
     
  19. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    I believe you are wrong lol. I have never heard of that being the case. You are fine to apply at other places while under contract.... I did this last year, I did not tell my previous school that I was interviewing, I only told them when I was actually offered the job. This was all in the summer though, I wouldn't recommend leaving any school in the middle of the school year.
     
  20. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Thanks, teacherguy!

    No, I'd never leave mid-year. I couldn't do that to my students and/or their families. :)
     
  21. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    I am in private school and make 98% of the pay for the surrounding parishes (counties). Like Alice said, I make more than some and less than others. We have health insurance, a retirement plan, and a 401K which they match up to 6% of our monthly salary. We do not have any of the End of Course tests but we are in the process of switching to Common Core like the public schools but my curriculum is very flexible. We have new (just out of school) teachers, teachers with varying experience levels, and several teachers that have already retired from a public school system.
     
  22. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    Oct 7, 2013

    I work in a private school but it's a special ed school so we so our curriculum is mostly up to us and we give alternate state testing so there's a lot less pressure in that area. Our pay and benefits are pretty good and after working here 2 years they will start to contribute to my retirement. I defintely would not suggest quitting your current job until you had a private school job lined up. I only gave 2 weeks notice when I left my last job.
     
  23. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    I was going to start a similar thread until I saw this. I'm also thinking of making the change.

    I'd love to work in a Christian environment! Plus, our lesson plans are taking HOURS this year with a county requirement.

    I've HEARD private schools are less stressful because there's more flexibility and less restrictions. Looking forward to getting out of all the politics involved with public education.

    Is the grass greener on the other side? ;)
     
  24. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I think just like anything, it's going to depend on the school environment where you land.
     
  25. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    So true--The school that I left at the end of last school year is what I am calling the most Un-Christian Christian school. It was a difficult 2 years. The students were basically either spoiled brats or drug addicts. I had 10 kids in a class of 19 that had been expelled from public school and would have had to go to the alternative military school if their parents did not have money. There was absolutely no curriculum and they really did not care if you taught or not as long as the whole class had an A or B. Athletes were not required to attend class. The straw that broke the camel's back was when they told me that I had to give a student (who had a 59.5 in my class) a C so that he would qualify for his athletic scholarship to play college ball. Basically they told me to give him the grade or my contract would not be renewed. I stood up and told the principal and headmaster that I would go to work in a fast food restaurant before I taught there again and they did not have to renew or not renew my contract because I was not coming back. I sent in a letter the next day saying that I was resigning at the end of the school year. I had my new job the day after that. I am friends with my new principal and her chemistry teacher had quit the same day so we took it as fate. My new school is a dream so just like public schools, there are good and bad private schools.
     
  26. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Oct 7, 2013

    I appreciate those who are offering more insight. Gives me much to chew on. :)
     

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