Question for Junior High Math Teachers...

Discussion in 'Middle School / Junior High' started by AnthonyA, Aug 3, 2007.

  1. AnthonyA

    AnthonyA Rookie

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    Aug 3, 2007

    Hi. I'm currently working as a teacher for children ages 5 through 11.
    Many of them are special ed. Most of my past teaching experience is on the Elementary level. I will be applying for an Elementray position for the upcoming year.

    Now, I have been recommended by the HR Director who hired me for this summer. She made a call and there is a position open to teach/tutor math in an after school program. I believe I'll be working with small groups, grades 6 through 12. I believe most of these kids will be special ed as well.

    To be honest, math is not my forte. At least not at the secondary level. Not to mention I am 35 so I have been out of Junior High & High School for quite some time lol

    So, I have two questions:

    Can someone give me a general idea as to the topics that will most likely be invloved at that level?
    Also, do you think some brushing up will most likely prepare me enough to be of help?

    I explained this briefly to the person interetsed in hiring me and he told me to call him next week to discuss it furthur.

    Thanks in advance.....
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 3, 2007

    At least in middle school, kids who lag behind probably never got a firm foundation in operations with fractions. In high school, it would probably be beginning algebra.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 4, 2007

    I have no special ed background, so I'll assume that some of your kids are taking a college prep math sequence.


    Many kids really struggle with positive and negative numbers. And a staggering number just don't know their times tables. (And, no, a calculator is NOT good enough.)

    In Algebra, basic equation solving, verbal problems and factoring are probably the biggest problem areas. (The factoring ties back into not knowing their times tables.)

    In geometry, lots of kids struggle with geometric proofs. Some of the problem is that it's a tough concept. But others struggle with basic memorization... theorems, area formulas.

    In Trig, the biggest problem is kids who are absent for the beginning. None of it is that complicated, but the material just builds and builds. A kid who misses the early stuff is lost.

    You might consider getting a Barrons SAT prep book. Find one with lots of explanation, not as many old exams. They give a decent overview to the topics from middle school through at least the end of Algebra, with a sprinkling of geometery and Algebra II.

    Let me know if I can help! (although we'll be upstate from the 11th to the 18th :) )
     
  5. AnthonyA

    AnthonyA Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2007

    Thanks alot. If I do get the position, I will get that SAT prep book. Perhaps an "Algebra For Dummies" book too lol :D
     
  6. Charger

    Charger Companion

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    Aug 4, 2007

    I have a few areas where as a 6,7, and 8th grade Math teacher that I see kids need the most work in. Fractions, decimals, and integer operations are major. If we're talking 7th and 8th, I find that students have difficulty with graphing equations and writing equations.
     

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