question for 2nd grade teachers

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Lindsnh, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. Lindsnh

    Lindsnh Companion

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    Jan 11, 2009

    How many writings are your students required to do? At our school 2nd grade has to do 4 each nine weeks, descriptive, friendly letter, expository and narrative. It is like pulling teeth b/c they only do two writings the whole year when they are in first grade and they are very much teacher guided. So when they get to 2nd they are clueless.We have to turn ours in to the P who grades them with a fine tooth comb and is very critical and expects them to be perfect. All the 2nd grade teachers at my school think this it is too much! Of course we want the kids to write, but turning in every single one to be torn apart by the P? The kids get frustrated by this process and it seems like it is teaching them to hate writing. anyways I am all for free writing and journal writing but we never get to do this b/c of the other writings. The school only started having the teachers turn in the writings a few years ago, and the teachers I have talked to at other schools in my area dont have to do this....do you??
     
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  3. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    Jan 11, 2009

    I have never heard of a principal grading writings such as this. First, how is the principal to know what writing/reading level a student is at? These types of writings correspond with our basal series. The first unit we wrote narratives. This unit we are focusing on persuasive writing. Friendly letter writing is done whenever I want. I usually do this beginning in Oct. and continue throughout the year. The other types of writings will be introduced as I start each new reading unit. Are parents aware of this procedure? Are you responsible for a writing grade on the report card? If you are I would not give it because YOU are not grading the writing, the principal is, so in turn, he or she should be giving the grade and any comments from parents should be directed to the principal. I would get my English/Language Arts coordinator for the district involved in this. This would NEVER fly in my district. Plus, my principal has more important issues to deal with than grading papers. Is this done in the other grades? If not, I would question why? If it is good for one it should be good for all.
     
  4. Lesley

    Lesley Habitué

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    Jan 11, 2009

    Last year we (k-6) had to submit writings every 9 weeks. We would score them with a rubric, turn them in to P who turned them in to her supervisor for review. The kids were given 55 minutes to make an 'outline', rough draft and final copy. Talk about crazy! They had enough trouble getting their name written neatly on the writing line, let alone all three steps in 55 minutes. This year they decided that was too much work for the P and her supervisor so 2nd grade was dropped from the process. We started our year last year with the 4 square writing and 6+ traits. Then someone somewhere brought up tree maps so we had to change abruptly mid year to tree maps. Not only confusing for the kids but also for the teachers. We are meeting this coming week to discuss 'new' ways to have our kids write. Too bad we just can't teach them to write w/o pressure of perfection on the first round.
     
  5. mom2ohc

    mom2ohc Habitué

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    Jan 11, 2009

    there is no way that my principal would have the time to do that either, and I think it is crazy! sorry you have to do that!
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jan 11, 2009

    Lind,
    We have to do 3 samples per nine weeks (which seems like a lot.) We have 4 different rubrics (one for each quarter) and they get progressively harder throughout the year -- so during the first quarter we might only be looking for every sentence starting with a capital letter and having end punctuation, but by the end, they must have subject/verb agreement, etc etc.

    We are not even allowed to mark our student's work at all on the paper. We do it on the rubric, but the child never sees that. We list one or two strengths, and choose one or two areas for improvement -- we do share that with the students so they can improve for the next time.

    I'm sorry your principal is making the kids hate writing. That is very sad.
     
  7. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jan 11, 2009

    I could see turning in a portfolio to the P including writing samples per quarter but that's nuts. It also doesn't seem to help the students. At the same time, I have to give your P kudos for at least holding teachers accountable (even though it is too extreme) . Sometimes the opposite is true and teachers don't seem to teach to a high standard as they should and could. I can see the benefit of doing this but it should be scaled back.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 11, 2009

    EEK- reading these posts makes me so thankful once again to teach where I do. We are a 'Reading and Writing Project' school. Using state and district curriculum, teachers have designed reading and writing calendars to use as guidelines. Our administrator looks over lesson plans, provides opportunities for additional professional development in curricular areas, fosters educational discussions amongst the staff, but bottom line we are trusted as professionals to do our jobs. Our expert opinions about students in our classroom and their progress are valued. We are not compared against each other as teachers and our students are nurtured on their developmental paths toward becoming better readers and writers. We have no set number of required publishings- and yet teachers are teaching writing on a daily basis, aiding students in their writerly efforts and yes, publishing and celebrating the work. We are accountable because we have a shared philosophy of what good teaching looks like and how children learn best, we set a high standard for ourselves, and are committed to preserving the way we deliver instruction.
     

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