Question about teaching experience and alternate route?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by pinkcupcake90, Mar 10, 2015.

  1. pinkcupcake90

    pinkcupcake90 Companion

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    Mar 10, 2015

    Hi, everyone.

    I just recently graduated with my MA in Humanities. My dream is to get a PhD and teach at the college level, but for now, I want to gain some teaching experience at the high school level. I would love to be an English teacher.

    I applied via alternate route. I took the Praxis, 24-hour pre-certification course, and the hygiene test. I applied for the CE a few weeks ago and am currently waiting to hear back.

    I feel like I am not a competitive applicant at all. The only teaching experience I have is 5 years at a Sunday school. :( So, I was thinking of getting an MAT so I could possibly gain some student teaching experience. Or should I get an English Education MA that leads to standard certification? Or should I just dive into the first module of the 200-hour program?

    I am so lost. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much. :)
     
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  3. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Mar 10, 2015

    My advice to you would be to apply to a post-BACC teacher prep program at an accredited school, complete the coursework and student teaching, take the praxis, and get your CEAS. I think it would be extremely difficult to get a position as an English teacher with just a CE. You could go for your MA at the same time, but it won't necessarily make you a more competitive candidate. However, it will put you higher on the salary scale if you're hired by a public school.

    Standard certification, by the way, will only happen after you've taught for a year. So, when you finish a post-bacc program, you'll have a CEAS. When you're hired as a teacher, you'll have a provisional license, and the standard cert will be after a year of teaching.

    Good luck.
     
  4. msleep

    msleep Rookie

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    Mar 10, 2015

    Why not just apply to your Phd program now? Why do you want to take time off and get teaching experience? How do you wish this experience will help you?
     
  5. Rodrigoperez

    Rodrigoperez New Member

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    Mar 16, 2015

    Hello,

    You can also do distance learning for your further study by continuing job.
     
  6. UditGanguly

    UditGanguly Rookie

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    Mar 17, 2015

    Education plays an important role in our life. In-fact I believe, one educate can prepare thousands of educated people. As a human being, it is one of the finest thing that we can do.
     
  7. alexf322

    alexf322 Rookie

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    Apr 8, 2015

    Hey,

    I too am from New Jersey and I would go the MA route and get an actual teaching degree and not the alternative route. (I am a traditional route teacher). The main reasons being that I know that almost half the schools in NJ prefer a degree in education for the exact reason you stated, student teaching. Apply for jobs now and put somewhere you are starting the alternative route. If a school enjoys you enough during the interview process they can hire you on an emergency sub contract while you finish your alternative route. Two teachers in my school were fortunate enough for this process.
     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Apr 8, 2015

    NJ hires almost equal number of alternate route and traditional route prepared teachers. I can see reasons for both routes, and think that what works for an individual is unique for every applicant. One of the draws of the AR has always been the opportunity to earn as they learn, as opposed to paying another year's tuition before having the chance to earn a salary. NJ has recently changed the requirements, and I don't know how that plays into the decisions that potential AR candidates will have to consider.

    For what it is worth, I am an AR teacher who has gone on to earn my MEd. in ESL. I once thought that my first year was probably much harder than that of traditional route teachers, but the more I read the posts of all the first year teachers who post here, I am not sure that my experiences were all that much different. First year tends to be hard for many teachers, and I think that I fared pretty well as I look back at it with the wisdom of experience and the benefit of some distance.

    I think that each candidate needs to weigh the pros and cons, consider their ultimate goal, and determine how much they are willing to invest to learning above and beyond the bare minimum needed to complete the program requirements. I have always been a life-long learner, and find learning to be broad based and exciting. I think that made me a very good candidate, since I still jump in to learn new skills and expand my horizons. I also had many years experience as a sub, something that I would highly recommend to potential AR candidates, although that is just my opinion.

    Consider carefully, weigh the pros and cons, and when comfortable, follow your heart. Best of luck.
     

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