Question about Spanish Speaking

Discussion in 'Special Subjects' started by Lopesss, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. Lopesss

    Lopesss Rookie

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    Jan 28, 2016

    Hi all!

    Okay, so I have a quick question. My father is trying to tell me that he keeps hearing stories on the news about how teachers in certain states are being fired because they cannot speak Spanish to their immigrant students (meaning they are monolingual and don't know how to speak Spanish). Supposedly the students' parents complained and now the teachers are getting fired. I'm trying to search for these stories on the internet and I can't find them. If anything, I'm finding that teachers/principals are being fired for trying to ban Spanish speaking. My dad is saying how I need to learn Spanish right away (he bought me Rosetta Stone lol) or I'll never find a job (I'm currently about to begin student teaching). While being bilingual obviously helps, I can't see how a teacher would be fired for NOT speaking Spanish. Any ideas?
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jan 28, 2016

    I have absolutely never heard of that. There are schools looking for bilingual teachers, and you would not be hired for those positions, of course.

    The native language in this country is still English, I think.
     
  4. Pandabear234

    Pandabear234 New Member

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    Aug 22, 2016

    That happened in the school district I attended as a child, over time there has been a large influx of Hispanic immigrants and the district felt it was best to start a Bilingual education program for students, letting monolingual teachers go and hiring Spanish-speaking, bilingual teachers. Many districts with a decent Hispanic population would definitely prefer to hire Spanish-speaking teachers, and maybe it would give you an edge, but it won't prevent you from being hired.
     
  5. Sherlock Brandon

    Sherlock Brandon New Member

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    Nov 11, 2016

    I understand your concern but learning Spanish is also a good option and you can definitely go for it.There are various Institutes which provides coaching for same.In my school, Archbishop Molloy High School where we have specific 'Spanish Club' in which students learn to read,write and speak Spanish so that they can learn an extra language which will only benefit you instead of any harm.Rest it depends on your interest.For now I will say,


    la mejor de las suertes :)

    adiós.
     
  6. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Nov 11, 2016

    News concerning education is often presented from the reporter's viewpoint and understanding. Often such news does not reflect reality. Currently, some news sources even purposefully propagandize their content. Two fantastic resources for college students on reading/listening with discernment is Levitin, Daniel J. A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age. N.Y.: Dutton, 2016, and Berger, Jonah. Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 2016; (this one is worth getting just for the clever optical illusion on the cover)! If I recall correctly, another book, Eagleman, David. The Brain. Pantheon Books, New York: 2015, near the end of the book scientifically analyzes the choice of words used in propaganda and how word choices can sway people one way or the other.

    When I first began teaching in 1982 an official at the school board told me that Spanish is quickly becoming a second language. My personal investigation has also found other languages are increasing in my state, especially Korean and Chinese. In my area, I know of two language classes, independent from the school system, for ESL adults; I have a friend who is a teacher in one of them. I don't know of current restrictions against non-bilingual teachers, but I do know that furthering your linguistic ability will benefit you in the long run. I try to pronounce foreign words as correctly as possible when I encounter them while teaching in an elementary classroom (using the Internet or friends as resources). My knowledge of basic Spanish alongside of English actually facilitates my recognition of phonemes that differ from these two languages. Foreign languages add spark to resumes and applications; it used to be applications only asked what languages you are fluent in, but currently some applications ask if you are familiar with any other language. If it doesn't interfere with your other coursework, I would highly recommend taking advantage of today's resources and learn Spanish. I would also recommend learning ASL, which will open up immediate in between teaching employment for you and could open up teaching positions. In some areas it is DIFFICULT! to obtain a teaching position, and any advantage you have will be a plus. A further option, although again, don't diminish your core subjects in your education, is to learn either Chinese or a Middle Eastern language, both of which could be advantageous, even if just familiar with the language.
     
  7. aguistep

    aguistep Guest

    Apr 11, 2017

    I have never heard of this happening before, but it all highly depends on the demographics of the area that you are student teaching. You definitely want to target all students so that everyone is learning. Spanish is important to learn for the sole fact that it is becoming a more and more common language, so it is of your benefit and the benefit of your students to learn the language; however, i don't think it is something you HAVE to learn. I know there are aides that help lessen this language barrier as well.
     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Apr 11, 2017

    Actually, if you have credentials to teach ESL, there is no mandate that you must speak any foreign language, because the purpose is teach the students how to speak English. There are many aids that the students can access, but the purpose is to teach English. Some schools are not even clear about the process of the ESL teacher, so I am sure that misinformation abounds. If you know Spanish but your population speaks Chinese or Korean, that Spanish won't do you much good, will it? Yes, I am certified to teach ESL.

    I am inclined to file this under the rampant "fake news" we see almost everywhere.
     
    ms.irene likes this.
  9. oeccseo

    oeccseo New Member

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    May 20, 2017

    In 1931, Canada achieved near total independence from the United Kingdom with the Statute of Westminster 1931, but at the time, Canada decided to allow the British Parliament to temporarily retain the power to amend Canada's constitution, on request from the Parliament of Canada. With the Constitution Act 1982, Canada took over that authority (as the conclusion of Patriation), removing the last remaining ties of legal dependence on the Parliament of the United Kingdom, giving the country full sovereignty.

    oeccglobaleducation

    Canada is a federal parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II being the head of state. The country is officially bilingual at the federal level. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many other countries. Its advanced economy is the eleventh largest in the world, relying chiefly upon its abundant natural resources and well-developed international trade networks. Canada's long and complex relationship with the United States has had a significant impact on its economy and culture.
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Bilingual as in English and Spanish, or English and French, or English and Hindi, or English and Chinese? The list could go on. ESL is teaching English as a second language to an individual who has a different native language. Since there are so many languages besides English, it would be very difficult to legislate bilingualism without proper consideration of the native language which is not English. In Canada, I can think of many languages more likely to fall under mandated bilingualism requirements, given the ties to the UK.. Bilingual teachers have different preparation and specifications since it is a two way process - you are teaching English to one portion of your class, while teaching the second language to the native English speakers.
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 21, 2017

    This depends entirely on the school's learning model. Some schools do an English-only ESL/TESL approach, where all instruction is given in English. Other schools take a bilingual approach, and there are a few different ways to do that. The teacher can teach one subject exclusively in one language and another subject exclusively in the other; co-teachers who each teach and speak in a different language; the teacher teaching first in one language and then repeating everything in the other language; the teacher teaching the morning in one language and the afternoon in another; plus others.

    If you're at a bilingual school where you are expected to teach in both languages, then I can see how you might be dismissed in favor of someone who is able to do that. Not all schools are going to use that method, though, so there will be plenty of opportunities for you to be an English-only teacher even at a school with a large population of English language learners.
     
  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 21, 2017

    But the second language isn't always Spanish. I am familiar with all of those bilingual models, and they are precisely that - bilingual. They even have their own certification requirements. It would be wrong to call bilingual ESL.
     
  13. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 21, 2017

    I didn't say that the other language in a bilingual program had to be Spanish. I was responding to the OP about how it seems unlikely that a person who didn't speak Spanish would be unable to hold down a teaching job.
     
  14. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 21, 2017

    We were both saying the same thing. In NJ, the second language in a bilingual program is apt to be Korean, Chinese, or Hindi - depends on the school district. A common misconception, even among people who should know better, is that ESL teachers must speak Spanish to do their job well. If OP wants to learn Spanish, that is great for her. But unless hired to be a bilingual teacher, I find it hard to believe that a district can fire those who don't speak Spanish. I will add that I did apply for an ESL position once and the principal claimed I was unfit for the job because I didn't speak Spanish. When the superintendent found out, the principal was let go - there were no Spanish speaking ELLs in the program, and it was blatant discrimination. I was asked to reapply, but I didn't like that the ex-principal could be running things so differently than school policy without the superintendent noticing. It was a huge red flag to me.
     

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