Question about resigning?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by cmw, Jun 17, 2010.

  1. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Jun 17, 2010

    I went to my new district and received paperwork today (medical etc..). I didn't get a contract yet to sign...but they took all my info. to verify employment for the correct step on the pay scale. Is it safe to resign even though I don't have a contract yet? (I'm guessing they'll be calling the board office to verify my years.)Should I just informally call them and then drop off the official letter later? :confused:
     
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  3. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Jun 17, 2010

    Would it be okay if you signed the contract and then resign? I would just be a bundle of nerves resigning before I signed my new contract.
     
  4. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Jun 17, 2010

    A bundle of nerves...that's how I feel. I just feel weird b-c my new school will be calling the board office at my "currrent" school to verify my years... but my current school doesn't know I'm leaving. I'm worried that looks bad b-c it'll be a shocker to them. :confused:
     
  5. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Jun 17, 2010

    I think the OP meant should she resign from her old job before signing the contract at her new job.
     
  6. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Jun 17, 2010

    :lol:
     
  7. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Jun 17, 2010

    That may be her best bet if she is worried about legalities.
     
  8. jab87

    jab87 Rookie

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    Jun 17, 2010

    I was told by a superintendent never to resign from one school before signing your new contract, You never know what can happen. I would definitely let the other school know that you interviewed and verbally accepted a job.
     
  9. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Jun 17, 2010

    Thanks for all the advice. I want to be professional...but I also don't want to put myself in a bind. I guess I want to have my cake and eat it too. :p I will call my "current, soon to be old" principal tomorrow and let her know I verbally accepted a job. I'll figure out who to call in the admin office too. I wonder if they they can post my job with out a resignation? Per our contracts we have until July 10th to resign so I've got time legally. :D
     
  10. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Jun 21, 2010

    update...

    I called my p and let her know I verbally accepted a position. She said she figured the would offer me the job and was great about it. She told me who to contact at the admin office. The person wasn't in so I left a message. I received a call back and missed it. The person wanted me to call them b-c they wanted to talk to me. (I had a feeling it was not going to be a good call). Well today I called her back. Although nice comments were made by her at the beginning and end of the call, the middle bothered me. She mentioned (several times) that I needed to make sure I turn in all Board property. (Well, of course I would. When I packed up my room I figured I wasn't coming back. I have only a couple things that I found that I will return when I resign. However, I also left numerous things I bought so the next person won't be screwed...a large rug, bell mallets, some instruments, and tons of music organized in itunes.) Then she pressed me about turning in my resignation letter. The conversation made me very uncomfortable. She asked if I had been approved at a board meeting yet for my new school. (I have not). I was very professional on the phone and basically said uh-huh and yes to most questions. I did not go into a rant or discussion about why I was leaving. I'm just worried that she will call my new school. :( I don't think she can do that...and there's nothing bad she can say. I am leaving well within the window per my contract so I am not sure what the problem is. So being professional seemed to bite me in the butt in this case. :p Thanks for reading this...it really has me stressed out.
     
  11. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Jun 22, 2010

    cmw - Are you leaving a charter school or a public school? If you have a union, contact them and your union rep or labor relations consultant can help you through this. All those questions about your new district and board meetings are none of her business.
     
  12. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Jun 22, 2010

    It is actually illegal to sign a new contract when you are still under contract. I was told this by my last district. People do it all the time and it is no biggie. But, I was told that it is an illegal act. :)
     
  13. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Jun 22, 2010

    Let me explain where she is coming from. And this is something that happens IN GENERAL so please do not think she was picking on you. When teachers leave a school, they will sometimes pack things that are school property: classroom libraries, professional books, reading programs, science and math kits, etc. The teacher feels like it is "hers." She has "owned" it for let's say 5 years and her name is all over it. The district sees it as an investment worth literally thousands of dollars. Each time a teacher leaves, things tend to "walk" away with them and the district has to go out and purchase new resources for the person hired. The teacher is not doing this in a malicious way. She really feels like the materials are hers. She earned them. The district meanwhile is out the money. Like I said in an earlier post. You are actually not supposed to sign a new contract while still being under contract. I was told this by my previous district. They told me that I had to take a tiny leap of faith and trust them that I was guaranteed a job. It was tough for me too! :cool: And I think I am pretty cool! Hopefully, this will help you to understand why this district person was so persistent. She does not mind that you are leaving. She is just thinking about the potential things that could come up missing once you have left. Now, we all know that you would not do that. So her fears are based on past situations. ALL THE BEST! :thumb:
     
  14. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Jun 22, 2010

    Thanks Missy & ST. I am in a public school. I was worried about the whole signing a contract thing. I was just worried that something could fall through. (I'm so paranoid to be without a job). But at this point I might as well just send in the letter. I just want to be done with them. ;) I will stop by later this week or next to my former school and drop off the couple things I found. I also want to touch base with my principal so she is aware that I did not take anything. I get that they don't want people taking things. I do have an inventory that I have to complete each year so hopefully that will help them see the things I took were all mine. (I had TONS of personal stuff including multiple shelving units, 30 clipboards, small boomboxes, 3' x 5' dry erase boards, and instruments. I was given no money in 3 years for my program so everything I bought was mine).
    Thanks for all your help, I feel better today about it. :D
     

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