Question about Power Teaching

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Becky123abc, Aug 5, 2008.

  1. Becky123abc

    Becky123abc Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2008

    Do any of you use Power Teaching in a self-contained classroom? Is that possible? I would think it's hard to do it with the same group of kids from 8:00 - 2:45.

    I would love to hear from someone close to my grade level (4th) who is self contained and has had success with PTing. I really want to make it work but I don't think anyone does anything like it at our school so I want to start strong and confident.

    Do you Power Teach for only certain subjects? Does is tire you?
    Would you share your daily schedule with me?

    I want to implement some of the strategies I've read about and I want to integrate my subjects...I don't even have all my teacher's manuals yet...I was just hired last week. I'm returning to the classroom after 11 years, and I'm going to 4th grade, which is new to me. So....I'm not as prepared as I'd like to be. I'm trying to research as much as I can for effective language arts/reading instruction. My reading series is so outdated...

    I will be teaching the following subjects...

    Bible
    Spelling
    Wordly Wise
    Reading (Open Court---1989...ugh!)
    Grammar (Abeka)
    Science (Bob Jones)
    History (After Christmas)
    Math (Scott Foresman...1998)

    Thanks so much to anyone that can share that info with me!
    Becky
     
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  3. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 5, 2008

    While I have been (and continue to be) unable to utilize the entire Power Teaching program, I do use several of its methods and have to profess that I love it! All of my experience has been in a self-contained classroom: I student taught in a 3rd grade class, and I ltsed in a 1st grade class, and it worked equally well in both. I didn't find it tiring at all. In fact, I found it energizing and it certainly cut down on the amount of work I had to put into classroom management!

    Power Teaching is not limited to any specific subject. It is a system of classroom management techniques (that, by the way, have been proven effective).

    Here is the link to the "official" site for Power Teaching: http://homepage.mac.com/chrisbiffle/Personal17.html

    Also, you can search for Chris Biffle on YouTube AND TeacherTube, and there are great videos to observe.

    Here is a great thread to read regarding PowerTeaching: http://forums.atozteacherstuff.com/showthread.php?t=62011

    Lastly (though absolutely not least!), check out Power Teacher's blog at www.classroompower.com. He shares tons of information, and it's all free!
     
  4. Becky123abc

    Becky123abc Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2008

    Thanks pwhatley! I'm so happy to hear it works for you in a self-contained classroom.

    Could you share your classroom rules with me?

    What parts of PT do you use? I plan to use the "Class/yes" and the "teach/ok" the first week. I want to introduce the T/OK by introducing the classroom rules.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    My classroom rules are:
    1. Be the best YOU you can be!
    2. Keep hands, feet, and objects to yourself.
    3. Receive permission from the teacher before you speak out or get out of your seat.
    4. Be polite and respectful at all times.
    5. Always do your best work.
    6. Follow directions and obey all school rules.

    The main thing that I do not use is PT's last rule: Keep Your Dear Teacher Happy. I do not use it at the behest of my grade level chair.

    I use the class/yes, teach/okay, switch, and hands and eyes. I also do not use the 10 finger woo - my kids couldn't get their minds around it, lol. Instead, I taught them how to applaud like the deaf do - they raise their hands in the air and wiggle their fingers like mad.
     
  6. mdee

    mdee Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2008

    Too redundant? Sp. ed. students?

    Becky123abc, I have been thinking similar thoughts. If I teach 6 lessons a day, (let's say: reading, language, spelling, math, science, and soc. st.), wouldn't it get really wearing and redundant if each of these lessons was taught using the techniques of PT? I could see using PT a couple times during the day, but not for the entire day and for every lesson. I absolutely love the ideas and energy that PT seems to bring.
    My other concern is that 12 of my 23 students are either LD, EBD, CD or have some other special needs. It seems like PT is very fast paced and requires that the students think quickly and have to be constantly attending. I'm not so sure all of my students would be able to do this. Has anyone used PT with special education students? How did it work?
    Thanks for any responses.
     
  7. love_reading

    love_reading Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2008

    I can see several similarities between this and cooperative learning. While I liked some things I saw when I briefly viewed some of the videos, I don't know if this style is quite for me. It looks very exhausting!
     
  8. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Aug 5, 2008

    I've been in school two days now, and just started using Power Teaching this year. I introduced it during discussion of procedures on day 1, having them make gestures for how to get another pencil, when to throw trash away, etc. We introduced Keep your dear...as the number one rule. I don't have a problem with talking without raising your hand--as a matter of fact, I like a lively discussion, so I didn't use that part. Then I said that rule #2 was that when I said "Class" they said "yes". Finally I taught the Teach/ok. They "taught" each other the procedures.

    Today, my class went over to my friends classroom for math. She's trying out the Power Teaching, too. So we used PT to teach the five main parts of a bar graph. They used gestures to remember them. It went very well. Then they collected information to create a graph (so that wasn't PT), and tomorrow we'll review the parts of a graph with PT, then they'll make a graph without PT.

    Is that making sense?

    It's like it was used part of the time to make a point. There is no way I could do it all day long, for every lesson. I do find that I'm using gestures a lot more, and I see the kids picking up on that and using gestures to talk to me! It's kind of funny. Another friend who popped her head in during math said she thought we looked like a bunch of aliens.

    But I think it's really going to work. If it helps stick the main points into the memory, then I'm all for it.
     
  9. love_reading

    love_reading Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2008

    I totally agree with the gestures and I think it's a great idea to use when teaching procedures, rules, routines the first days. The "teach" part is just like "Think Pair Share" or "Timed Pair Share" in cooperative learning, except with gestures.
     
  10. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Aug 7, 2008

    OK. It's Day 4 of school and my arms are getting a workout. I seem to be using it once or twice a day. Some of it is just to review a point made earlier.
     

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