Question About Long Term Subbing in Sept.

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by MMRbella, Jun 11, 2007.

  1. MMRbella

    MMRbella Companion

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    Jun 11, 2007

    Hello everyone!

    I was just offered an opportunity to be a long term sub for a 2nd grade class, from Sept to Dec. Having just graduated, I really do not know what to expect...

    Being that I am opening up the classroom for the new school year, do I essentially get to structure the classroom/routines in my own way? Or will the teacher do all of that, and I just do it her way? I've been subbing day to day since I graduated in January, and even though I am a new teacher, I have very clear ideas about the way I want my classroom set up. I am HOPING that I will be able to actually "be the teacher" until the other one comes back... but I do not know!

    Seasoned teachers- please help!!! :eek:
     
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  3. E Bunni 99

    E Bunni 99 Rookie

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    Jun 11, 2007

    In my county, it is up to the teacher who leaves. If you want the sub to have the control of lesson plans and grading so that you can have your time off as needed- you may. But for those teachers who are control freaks you can make the lesson plans and do the grading and just have the sub follow along. I would recommend getting in touch with the teacher and seeing how he/she wants to have you work in the classroom.
     
  4. TXTCHR29

    TXTCHR29 Cohort

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    Jun 11, 2007

    The teacher will most likely give you sub plans, as well as the way she runs her classroom (behavior plans, rules, consequences, etc.), because she will want her students to know the rules and what they should expect when their teacher returns. Teachers that I've worked with in the past who have been out for maternity leave, have had everything laid out for their long term sub.

    I currently have a friend who is expecting and will be out at the beginning of the year. She is working this summer to make all her copies, write out lesson plans and set-up her room.

    Good Luck.
     
  5. TeacherRW

    TeacherRW Cohort

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    Jun 12, 2007

    I have done two maternity leaves at the beginning of the school year. Basically, the regular classroom teacher set-up the room her way including rules and expectations. It was my responsibility to create and maintain her classroom environment. We spent several hours together so that I could get a feel for everything. Even though it was "my" classroom for a short time, I was still a guest. I like to think that I did a good job following their lead but know that I interjected some my own philosophy at times.

    Likewise, when I was on my maternity leaves, I had everything established for the substitute. I had about a week's worth of lesson plans ready with a rough calendar of what I would expected to cover during my leave. She wrote up the specific weekly lesson plans based on my anticipated schedule.

    Have a great time during your long-term position. Do your best... it often leads to a full-time position or that positive exposure that'll get your foot firmly in-the-door.
     
  6. Mrs_Barrett

    Mrs_Barrett Cohort

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    Jun 12, 2007

    I did a long term subbing position right before I got my full time position. I actually subbed for the teacher next door to where I student taught the semester before. The teacher was unable to start the year, but she let me know her expectations for the students. We created at least a week or two of lessons together. After that I was on my own, which was perfectly fine since I was use to this type of classroom. Plus the neighboring teacher, where I student taught, worked together with my teacher. So we wrote lesson plans together. The kindergarteners knew me as the teacher. I think it was hard for the regular teacher to take back control of the class, because they didn't know her.

    I'm very worried about this myself, since I'm due to have a baby the 2nd full week of school. I'm hoping to get in at least the first couple of days, so I can explain the rules and expectations to my class.
     
  7. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Jun 12, 2007

    MMRbella, this is going to be a great experience for you! You're going to learn so much & do things that many subs never get to experience, such as open house parent night, taking yearbook pictures, doing progress reports/report cards, maybe going on a field trip, etc.

    Back when I was subbing, I did a long term assignment for a teacher for the last few months of the year, but I think that subbing for the very first few months is a little harder because you're the one who'll have to set the ground rules, routines, & procedures. This will affect how the kids behave & can determine if you'll have a rough first half or a smooth one.

    I'd hope that the teacher that you're subbing for will want to support you as much as possible & provide weekly lesson plans by faxing them to the school office or emailing them in an attachment to you. I would expect her to give you her home # or at least home email address so you can contact her when you need to. If I were you, I'd touch base w/ her every Friday to let her know how that week went (unless she doesn't want you to contact her that often).

    I'm sure she'd want you to do things her way as far as student discipline is concerned. However, she may let you do certain things the way you want to.

    Good luck & have fun!
     
  8. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Jun 13, 2007

    When I had my second child, I stayed home for the first 12 weeks of school. My principal would not ALLOW me to give my sub plans. I was told "hands off-it's her classroom for 12 weeks". I didn't exactly agree with that and pushed until my principal acknowledged that it was MY classroom for the rest of the year and certain procedures and rules needed to be in place from the start.

    It was awful when I came back.
     
  9. MMRbella

    MMRbella Companion

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    Jun 20, 2007

    Thanks for posting! :) I was just wondering though- when it came to physically opening the classroom (arranging the furniture, hanging things up, creating back to school bulletin boards, etc) did she do it- or did you?

    Also- did the school permit you to preview teacher's guides and materials beforehand (or otherwise help you become familiar with the program)? I know that you student taught in the same building, but I'm not sure if you had the same grade. :confused:

    I am very nervous about this! I am the kind of person that likes to be as ORGANIZED as possible... this is driving me crazy! Lol. I understand that the first days of school set the tone for the entire year, and it's very important to me to make sure that I am as prepared as possible. Please help!!! :D
     
  10. knittingbec

    knittingbec Comrade

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    Jun 20, 2007

    Can you get in contact with her? Maybe if you call the school office and explain your situation, you can give them your phone number and ask them to ask her to call you. (They may be more comfortable with that than with giving her contact info.)

    I did a long term sub and the other teacher didn't do any of the planning or setting up for me. I liked it that way, but it would've been nice the other way too. The teacher I subbed for ended up not coming back and I was given her permanent position.
     
  11. MMRbella

    MMRbella Companion

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    Jun 20, 2007

    What kind of leave did she take? You lucked out that she didn't come back! :)
     
  12. knittingbec

    knittingbec Comrade

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    Jun 20, 2007

    She went on medical leave, and then decided to take early medical retirement. Yes, I was really thankful to stay with "my class" the whole year---especially because I took a bit of a risk turning down another job at the school before my job became permanent (because I wanted to stay with my class/grade level)! Unfortunately---I had to live in the classroom with 30 years of her j-u-n-k all year long!
     
  13. Mrs_Barrett

    Mrs_Barrett Cohort

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    Jun 21, 2007

    Sorry it took a while to repost back. I don't always remember to check this thing out. As far as setting up the classroom with all the materials, it was already done. I helped with doing bulletin boards (I actually created one while she was gone, that she didn't have a clue about). We both set up the calendar area. We actually did this differently. She had an easal, and I used it right next to the calendar; and when she took over she moved it back away from the calendar. I knew this, because I subbed for her every other week until I got my full time job.

    Yeah I student taught in ESL kindergarten and subbed in an ESL kindergarten. I could have taken the teachers books before school started to work on lesson plans. I did once school started and I wanted to write lesson plans on the weekend.

    Don't worry too much about it. I'm very worried for my own classroom, because like you stated it does set the room for the rest of the year. I think the best thing you could do is be very open with this teacher. Talk with her/him every week. We would converse through email daily or at least every other day.
     
  14. Mrs_Barrett

    Mrs_Barrett Cohort

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    Jun 21, 2007

    Now, let me understand this. You are now the full time teacher for the whole year? Or are you now contracted for this position? If she's gone and isn't coming back, then you can get rid of her stuff that you don't need.
     
  15. knittingbec

    knittingbec Comrade

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    Jun 21, 2007

    Well, that was a few years ago, but when I got hired in, she technically was still on the faculty--acting in her best interest, she waited until the last possible moment to choose the retirement option, and finally came to the classroom to get her things. Luckily, that classroom had loads of cabinets! I just shoved her stuff in there and closed the doors!
     

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