Question about interviewing out of state

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by GTB4GT, Feb 25, 2020.

  1. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    I am considering a relocation for personal reasons and, of course, want to look for a job ahead of time. What is reasonable and customary in this field about expenses involved in travel and lodging to interview? Are they covered by the school or district? The candidate? Or a combination? At the 2 schools where I have taught, I and all my peers were local residents so I have no knowledge or experience with this. Thanks in advance for any replies.
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Generally, your expenses to apply and interview are yours alone. If money may be a problem, many schools will interview via skype.
     
  4. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    I have interviewed out of state for various jobs, but I was never reimbursed for travel, lodging, and relocation until I got a director-level position. When I interviewed out of state as a teacher, it was all over the phone.
     
  5. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    The school districts are probably not going to pay for your expenses. The only time a company will probably pay expenses is if they are doing a nationwide search for a specific candidate and maybe a head hunter is involved to recruit you. Big companies have that kind of money to spend but I can't see school districts doing that.
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    In the US in education, it is not customary to cover any interview or relocation expenses. You have the bare the burden alone. I have never heard of any public school district that will reimburse a teacher for travel or relocation expenses. They only do that for district superintendents.

    Many places will offer a phone interview or a Skype interview if you are not local, and some places that have terrible teacher shortages will actually offer a job over the phone rather than making you came there to meet in person. But beware, if they are willing to do this, then they are usually very desperate for teachers -- and often, there is a reason for that. (low pay, terrible working conditions, etc.) It is hard to determine what this reason is, long distance.

    Also, unless the place is incredibly short of teachers to start with, you will not be competitive as a long distance applicant. If they choose to interview you, they will either have to settle for phone or Skype, or drag out the interview schedule to give you time to get there (at your own expense) for the interview. Schools are leery of hiring candidates that don't live locally for many reasons. One, you might change your mind and not actually come, and then they have to start the search over. Two, you might misjudge how much it costs to move your entire life and home, pay new deposits, buy or sell a house, etc, and you may not follow through at the last minute due to costs. Third, unless they are very short on teachers, no one wants to rely on just a phone call or skype to get to know a person. Nothing takes the place of face-to-face meeting. Many schools want to do multiple interviews, along with a teaching demo. Obviously, this can't be done over a phone or skype.

    I've relocated twice in my teaching career. Here are the hints I will give you that will help:

    • First, go head and get licensed in the state where you want to teach way ahead of time. It generally costs about $100 to apply. You have to send original transcripts and a copy of your current certification for review. Many, many districts (again, unless the state is very short on teachers) will not even consider interviewing you unless you already have their state's certification. When I moved from Virginia to North Carolina, I got my NC license before I moved and it was a good thing. The policy in NC is that you can't even apply for a job without putting your license number on the application (and it's done by computer, so you can't just skip it or put an explanation in.) No state certification -- you can't even apply. And you may find that they have many requirements you will have to meet first. Best to find out ahead of time. It is best to do this way before April, because that is when Departments of Education get bombarded with college graduates getting their certifications. You will get a quick answer in March or early April, but it will take months to get a response once May rolls around. I applied for my NC certification in January, and got it in the mail by the end of January. When I moved to Florida, it was a last minute kind of thing, and I didn't apply until the end of June. My actual certification didn't arrive until October! (Fortunately, Florida has a huge teacher shortage -- because of lousy pay -- so they were willing to let me start teaching knowing my actual certification would arrive later.) Many places won't do that.
    • Second, do your research. Find out the pay schedules (many of them are on the internet) for the districts where you are interested. Call and ask questions. When I moved to Florida I was shocked to learn that not only do they not have tenure (neither did NC) but 90% of the district will only accept up to 8 years of experience. So if you have 15 years experience, you will still only get paid as an 8th year teacher. You also want to check to see if that district has offered raises of any kind in the previous ten years. You will find that many districts haven't even offered cost-of-living increases. Also ask about how much you will need to pay each month as your share of health insurance. It can be very significant in some places. One district I looked at only offers $900 per year for having a Master's degree! Have you ever heard of such a low amount?
    • If there are specific requirements that are different than you state, will the new district pay for them or do you have to pay yourself? Just because a state says it offers reciprocity doesn't mean you want have to take tests or gain certifications sometimes. They may require PRAXIS scores, but they may not accept your PRAXIS scores if they were taken too long ago. You may have to take them again. You may have to add endorsements. For example, when I moved to Florida, I found out that by Florida law all teachers must become ESOL certified within their first 5 years. You have to take 5 graduate level classes and that can be very expensive (and even if they do pay for the classes, you still have to do the time to attend and earn the credits.) Also in Florida, all elementary teachers and other teachers who teach reading must also become Reading Specialist within 5 years. So there are more graduate classes you must take. All of those classes, in addition to working full time is quite a burden, even on the most eager person.
    • If it is a right-to-work state, you don't have to worry about being a part of a union (because they aren't allowed -- they have associations instead.) If you are moving to a union state, you may want to call that state union. Union reps can provide all kinds of valuable information about which districts are good, and which ones to avoid.
    • Last, realize you may not get the same pay when you move, you may have to take a pay cut. When I moved from Virginia to NC, I had to take a pay cut. No choice -- they pay less in NC. Fortunately, the cost of living in NC was less. When I moved from NC to Florida, I had to take a HUGE pay cut -- because Florida is one of the lowest paying states around (and the cost of living is not any less, it is actually much more expensive to live here than it was in NC.) You not only have to look at the salary, you have to look at the actual cost of living. Otherwise, you are comparing apples to oranges.
    I wish you the best of luck as you look to relocate.
     
  7. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    Feb 25, 2020

    To all, thanks for the responses. RainStorm, I especially appreciate your post - it was one of the most comprehensive and well thought out posts I have ever seen.

    Most of my life was spent outside of education. The way things are done in this arena are almost incomprehensible to one whose time has been spent in the private sector. There is no way that I would take a job based on a phone or Skype interview. I think you have to "see and feel" a place of employment to know if it is a good fit for both parties. I suspect I will have to invest a little bit to go do my research but it's a small investment to make at the end of the day.
     
  8. Pisces

    Pisces Companion

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    Independent schools cover relocation. A friend of mine got a relocation package from an independent school here in my city (Atlanta) and she had to work for them for at least two years. Another colleague of mine moved to NYC to teach and that independent school paid for his move and provides housing in the form of a tiny studio apartment attached to the school. Keep in mind that these schools in Atlanta and NYC charge $30K - $40K in yearly tuition, respectively.
    Now with the enrollment dropping due to covid-19, I don't know if those schools are offering relocation any more.
    (I used to work at one of these independent schools. My last day was two weeks ago when the school year ended. I am thinking about returning to public school.)
     

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