Question about IEP goals

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by msmac21, Apr 30, 2014.

  1. msmac21

    msmac21 Companion

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    Apr 30, 2014

    I have an interview on Friday for a special ed position. We were asked to write an IEP for a "fake kid" based on an ER. I'm questioning myself on how good my goals are because I want them to be perfect! I've never written IEP goals with just an ER to look off of.

    Here is what I have so far. Again this is a fictional kid and everything is made up. So no confidentiality issues. Background on the kid: first grade, autistic but very high functioning, smart but needs to work on phonemic awareness. He can read but can't sound out words because he needs work on letters/sounds to be able to decode. Also struggles with subtraction and writing. Biggest issue is behavior. Disruptive in class and lacks social skills.

    Goals:

    Reading: When given 10 words in picture form, "Bobby" will identify and segment beginning, middle, and ending sounds and verbally blend sounds to accurately read words with 80% accuracy.

    Reading: Given a text that includes 20 consonant blends and long and short vowel patterns, "Bobby" will read aloud the text by decoding with 70% accuracy.

    Math: When given 20 addition and subtraction problems using numbers up to 20, "Bobby" will answer 90% or more correctly for all problems graded.

    Given an academic or behavioral task by an adult or peers, "Bobby" will accept and complete the task with 90% accuracy with no more than 2 verbal cues.

    "Bobby" will engage in positive peer interactions by working cooperatively in 80% of opportunities to do so.

    OT: Given top, middle, and bottom guidelines and verbal prompting, "Bobby" will be able to write his first and last name and copy 10 short words (5-6 letters) using appropriate letter formation with 90% accuracy.



    My biggest questions are the percentages of accuracy. Not sure if they seem about right or not. Also, my OT goal. I'm not an OT so obviously I'm not sure if that seems like a good goal. Been googling a lot and asking some teachers in my current school.

    Hoping to get some quick suggestions so I can start revising soon!:help:
     
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  3. bros

    bros Phenom

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    May 1, 2014

    Depending on the IEP format, you might need to include who will be testing the goal, or there might be a spot on the IEP to indicate who will be testing for it.

    For the OT goal, you might want to specify if it is being tested before or after the student has done other work, or perhaps after they take a short break from doing work, as if the student has motor fatigue issues, you would want to avoid having the goal being tested when the student may be distressed.
     
  4. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    May 1, 2014

    By 5/1/2015, given 20 addition problems with sums less than 10, Bob will solve independently using a number line with 100% accuracy in 2 out of 3 trials as measured by teacher created test and observation data.

    That's pretty much how I write goals for my moderate/severe Special Ed kids. Don't be too specific on the task but look at the skill that is being addressed. Sometimes goals are written as content based as opposed to skill based - being able to recite the Declaration of Independence versus being able to write a paragraph.

    I like the child to attempt 100% mastery of a goal. With my population we are able to do benchmarks to break down the progress on a goal.
     
  5. Nate

    Nate Companion

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    May 1, 2014

    Yeah, we've lately been encouraged to put a timeline right in the goal (in the past, it's been assumed that a goal would be for the duration of the IEP unless otherwise stated), but those are clear, measurable goals.
     
  6. manda80411

    manda80411 Rookie

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  7. ca_sped

    ca_sped Rookie

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    May 5, 2014

    I have to include how many trials and how my data will be collected.

    For instance:

    When given 10 subtraction problems with regrouping, student will calculate the difference with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 trials as measured by student work samples.

    When asked five who, what, or where questions about an instructional level reading, student will answer with 80% accuracy in 4 out of 5 trials as measured by teacher made tests.

    Our IEP system automatically inserts the benchmark dates for us.
     
  8. Nate

    Nate Companion

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    May 6, 2014

  9. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    May 7, 2014

    You may want to include examples, like this...

    Reading: When given 10 words in picture form, "Bobby" will identify and segment beginning, middle, and ending sounds and verbally blend sounds (for example, cat, /k/ /a/ /t/) to accurately read words with 80% accuracy.

    This will show that you actually know what you're supposed to be measuring. Also, when your IEP and student goes on to another teacher/classroom, they will be able to know what exactly needs to be measured. Although most of your other goals don't need examples. Other posters have given you great feedback.
     
  10. MrShiva

    MrShiva Rookie

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    May 30, 2014

  11. SpecialKay

    SpecialKay Rookie

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    Jun 3, 2014

    I'm going to answer more philosophically and generally in the hope that this helps. When you are writing an IEP goal, ask yourself, "If I didn't know this student and have never seen him or her work before, would I be able to replicate this goal?"

    You got some other good advice, including that goals need to be clear and measurable, and if possible, provide examples.
     

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