Push pins?

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by diggerdeb, Sep 9, 2003.

  1. diggerdeb

    diggerdeb Comrade

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    Sep 9, 2003

    I am really interested in what you folks do with push pins in your classrooms. How do the children practice fine grip with them? What kinds of things are the kids doing? Pictures? Letters?
    What is on the back of the paper-cardboard?
     
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  3. MDMontessori

    MDMontessori Companion

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    Sep 10, 2003

    In our room is a push pin lesson. We have a square piece of carpet..about 3 x 3 on the tray. There is a corn cob holder thingy with one point broken off. Works better than the pin. This is stuck into the top of an empty film container. Out of contruction paper I trace an outline of a shape...right now it is triangles and leaf designs. It is centered on the paper. They push the pin all around the outside enough times that they can then push out the same they are pricking.

    This is kept on top of a bookcase out of reach of the 3's but available to the kinder.

    Eileen
     
  4. AJK

    AJK Pre-k Montessori Teacher

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    Sep 10, 2003

    We do the same as Eileen, but I use large push pins (not corn cob holders). You can get a tub of large ones at Office Depot-type stores but some dollars have them too. I have my shapes on regular copy paper. They vary from very basic shapes at the beginning of the year, seasonal shapes throughout the year, and more complex shapes at the end of the year. The child punches on the black outline of the shape, keeping the holes as close together as possible. When it is completed the shape can be punched out (like make your own perforated edges). I have the child glue the punched out shape and the outline next to each other on a half sheet of construction paper. It's great lesson, not only does it work on fine motor skills and eye-hand coordination, but it takes a lot of patience and concentration. I've done it with children who are as young as 3 but they must be ready. I always stress that the pin is sharp and should only be used on the paper.
     
  5. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Sep 10, 2003

    push pins

    I create monthly papers i change based on season or content/subject area for the month. I use the large push pins, JUMBO and also provide the thinner ones. Since I use this in an ELEMENTARY classroom it allows the children to hold the pin as a pencil, between the first and second fingers. Then they are to follow along the border of the picture that I provided. The fine motor skills and the eye hand cordination is required to complete the picture and for the picture to 'pop'out.

    I also allow children to use the same paper for paper punching. where they need to grab hold of a hole puncher and follow along the border of the picture, punching large holes around till the picture can be loose.

    I have seen skewers used (big toothpick looking sticks) which are alot safer to use and can be purchased at dollar stores. The cheeper ones are not always the best as they may not last the longest.
     
  6. MDMontessori

    MDMontessori Companion

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    Sep 10, 2003

    I did not know they had those big push pins. I have a staples right by work..I am going to look for them.

    Eileen
     
  7. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Sep 11, 2003

    the hunt

    Ya know Eileen how you search dollar stores for the perfect tray or container for a practical life lesson....

    Push pin collections are imperative!
    I can easily get the teeny ones (NOT THUMB TACKS) with the little knob on it. (those are great for elementary when you are doing a huge project and need them all to do the activity)
    There are JUMBO (my jumbos seem to lose the knob from the pin and i have tried to glue them after that happens but then they usually will not last after that) There are many sizes. (Think about what size PENCIL do kids use and when and that could give you an idea on when to use a different size.)
     
  8. AJK

    AJK Pre-k Montessori Teacher

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    Sep 11, 2003

    Yup we always use the real big ones. They are great for little hands. Push Pin is one of my favorite lessons. At Office Depot they come in a plastic cylinder-type container. They're usually located by the corkboards. I got myself a package of 12 at the dollarstore once, they've lasted for years.:)
     
  9. austeach

    austeach Companion

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    Sep 11, 2003

    Many of you have mentioned using push pins with younger children, and I THINK with older children, but 100% sure. I teach grade 4 and was wondering whether push pins can be used with this age group and do they enjoy it. I picture them loving it, and I definitely have some kids with poor fine motor skills, so can see the benefit. I suppose I should just go ahead and give it a go huh?:)
    Do I have it right that the kids just keep punching around the outline of a picture until it can be pressed out, like the edge of stamps? Sorry, that may have been explained already.
     
  10. AJK

    AJK Pre-k Montessori Teacher

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    Sep 11, 2003

    Yup that's the jist of it!
     
  11. hillsidefogo

    hillsidefogo Companion

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    Sep 11, 2003

    I'm intrigued. I've never heard of a 'push pin' lesson but it sounds like a good idea for fine motor practice. What do you use for the board? Do you have individual boards and is it set up as a center?
    Dawn
     
  12. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Sep 11, 2003

    under the carpet padding

    I have never bought it myself but i think it looks most like the carpet padding when you lay down a new carpet in a room. If i had to get it from the hardware store i really think thats what it looks most like.
    I have used sandpaper like sponges that lasted for a little while but not long enough.
    I have seen people use cereal boxes and brown boxes (recycled) as the backing.

    BY THE WAY- NEVER DO THE ACTIVITY DIRECTLY ONTO YOUR LAP with the padding on it!:D
     
  13. AJK

    AJK Pre-k Montessori Teacher

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    Sep 12, 2003

    The Montessoti push pin mats work best. We've used regular sponges and they work ok. The best thing I've found to buy was in a dollar store. They had a pack of thin "sponges" (I don't know what they were called, there was no label) that look as if they would be used for scrubbing pots. Have you ever bought a sponge that had a (typically) green part that would be used scrubbing? It would be like a package of just the green part. Anyway, we folded these scrubbers in half, hot glued them and they are the perfect push pin mats!
     
  14. diggerdeb

    diggerdeb Comrade

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    Sep 13, 2003

    Thank you for all the ideas and suggetions. I'm heading for the dollar store, now!:p
    Any other Monssi (sorry, I can't spell it) tricks and tips that the rest of us can get excited about?
     
  15. diggerdeb

    diggerdeb Comrade

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    Sep 13, 2003

    Sorry Montessori teachers.
    I promise to learn to spell Montessori.
    Montessori-Montessori-Montessori;)
     
  16. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Sep 14, 2003

    the perfect display

    Every thing is either on a tray, in a basket. The display of the practical life area is really inviting to a child. Each lesson has everything you would need RIGHT on the tray. (some people require the kids to walk across the room to fill a pitcher up with water and MANY accidents occur on the return so I have seen in the prek rooms, water IN pitchers at a side table and on the tray is a laminated picture of a pitcher so the child knows to get one.)

    In the elementary room I noticed there are practical life items such as carving wood (my class only carved from soap) I had a sewing kit and cheap bolt of cloth, some patterns like a heart or bear (it really was a dog but NEVER looked like it when done) for them to trace cut and sew then white polyfill that looks like cotton but is really fluffy. Knot tying and braiding board. Shoe polishing (HATE IT)

    Food preparations such as apple coring (buy the tool with the circle in the middle and the 'pie' pieces coming from it so u press down ontop of apple with two hands) Bread cutting or angel food/pound cake cutting
    orange juicing
    nut cracking/shelling
    Peeling and cutting carrots and cucumber
    Bannana slicing ( www.montessorinsuch.com has a bannana slicer tool like the apple slicer only its not round but elongated!)
    If there was a sale on grapes or other fruits I also would bring them in

    I also had adapted some items to bring from home from my kids collections of stuff. Woodkins and Barbie.
    Dont get me wrong it was not intended for play. Instead I had a killer collection of fabrics that i begged from the internet anyone who was willing to give samples and the kids would do fashion design with it. Barbie was also a fashion activity BUT more importantly was the role playing and socialization. I only had two dolls on the tray with a set of clothes. That is the extent of my 'toy' but turned into a practical life lesson stuff. I have visited MANY montessori preschools looking for the right one for my children and was SHOCKED at the 'toy' items on the shelf and lack of montessori mats. BUT I can totally see how everything can be made into a lesson.

    My kids went to Summit-Questa Montessori in Davie
    also to Three Village Montessori School in Weston
     
  17. olliemaes

    olliemaes New Member

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    Sep 14, 2003

    So many items can be used for Montessori lessons - it seems like everything I pick up in a store is a possibility! In our school, the 3-6 classroom does have water activities and some require filling a pitcher and carrying it across the room. The younger ones spill frequently, however, they clean up their own messes with a bucket and sponge provided on a shelf. After a few cleanings, they usually get the hang of it and will adjust accordingly so as not to spill - be it walking slower, filling the pitcher half full, etc. It's interesting to watch!:) They also serve themselves lunch and learn to pass the plates to the left, as well as clean up after lunch. In our elementary classrooms, the children work pretty well on their own. Weaving boards are out, quilting squares are available, pet care is their responsibility, calendar & weather postings are done by the children - it's a wonderful experience to be a Montessori guide!
     
  18. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Sep 14, 2003

    are you a montessori teacher?

    How exciting olliemae, come often and share with us.
     
  19. olliemaes

    olliemaes New Member

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    Sep 14, 2003

    Re: are you a montessori teacher?

    Yes - Montessori 3-6 & 6-9; this year teaching 6-9 and loving it!
     

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