Publishing a class book...

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by brandi0718, Dec 3, 2008.

  1. brandi0718

    brandi0718 Comrade

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    Dec 3, 2008

    I teach 1st grade and we are suppose to write a book and have it published, but i can not think of anything that would be fairly easy for the students....does anyone have any ideas??? PLEASE HELP! thank you so much!:thanks::thanks::thanks:
     
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  3. Kteacher06

    Kteacher06 Companion

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    Dec 3, 2008

    When you say, "have it published" do you mean that it needs to be pages that are bound together and have a cover? I don't teach first, but I make class books all the time with my K class. You can give them topics or sentences to finish. At this time of year, there are a lot of topics. Also, each child should illustrate his/her story.

    Examples..
    - If I lived with Santa at the North Pole...
    - My favorite thing about this time of year is...
    - If we had a snowstorm and couldn't go to school, I would...


    Good luck!
     
  4. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Dec 3, 2008

    We just did a really easy 3 day story and it worked out GREAT. This was a new method that I sort of made up for this class, and they did so much more work that I have seen them do during regular mini-lessons and writer's workshop. I have used a similar method for older children writing research papers, but never tried it with fiction (it's on my website in the signature if you're curious about that.)

    Day 1- we read the stories from the book Kit and Kat by Tomie DePaola. We discussed how stories have characters, a problem and a solution. In this case, the characters were cats and their problems were sort of "small moments" (forgetting PJ's when staying at grandma and grandpa's house, a new bike but can't reach the peddles and a bully.)

    I had the kids pair-share and discuss a problem they could write about. I said that since the characters in the story were cats, they could have their characters be human or an animal- they all chose an animal, of course!

    I modeled writing my own story (about a bunny) and her problem. She went to see her granny and they went to the beach, but she forgot her swim suit. I had told my kids a REAL story about this happening to me- which it did, before I wrote it. I made the connection for them about how the story in Kit and Kat reminded me of the time we went to Lake Michigan and got all the way into the city but I didn't have my swim suit. My cousin who was a big teenager, loaned me shorts and a t-shirt. It was way too big, but at least I got to go in the water. I modeled ONLY the introduction of the story (Fluffy went to visit her Granny and cousins in Chicago. She packed all of her things.. blah, blah. When they got to the beach, she realized she didn't have her swim suit.)

    I gave the kids about 15-20 minutes to write the introduction where the character was shown with a problem. Everyone did GREAT! Oh, BTW, I made each child a little book with primary lined paper w/ the picture space at the top and stapled about 6 pieces inside a construction paper cover.

    Day 2- We re-read the story from the day before and discussed the problem. We talked about what I might do if I were at the beach and realized I forgot my suit. I modeled using FIRST and then NEXT as she thinks of ways to solve the problem. And then I suggested they pose a question, so the reader has to guess what might happen next. Most kids did that too, but I didn't say they had to. (First Fluffy dumped out her whole bag and looked and looked. Next, she told her granny that she didn't have a swim suit with her. How would she go swimming without her bathing suit?)--this is a bit shorter than my actual writing was.

    Again, they had about 15-20 minutes to write.

    Day 3- TODAY- we talked about solving the problem. I suggested they use the word FINALLY to show how they actually solved the problem after going through some steps. I also suggested they write how the character felt or what they did once the problem was solved. (I wrote about Fluffy's cousin giving her the too big clothes, but how swimming was fun anyway.)

    Then, they went off and wrote their conclusions. A lot of kids had written their conclusions yesterday incidentally, but I was able to confer with them and help them solidify their endings a bit better.

    Tomorrow we are going to write our about the author page. Next week we will spend the week editing, revising and publishing the books into "real books."

    No one copied my story and they all wrote their own individual books based on their interests... yes, I had the three headed dog that wanted to blow up the world and failed, the indiana jones spin off, and a few other typical ones (Adventures of super Lizard) but I also had lots of great stories about hamsters who chase hamster boys at recess, dogs who drop their ice cream cones, kitties who go to concerts, fish that find themselves locked out of their house and all sorts of other creative stories. Many kids used all 6 sheets (front and back) and a couple even asked for more paper. I also had a few that only used 3 pages, 1 side, but they got the beginning, middle and end and all the elements of the story- so it's fine. It just shows their development!
     
  5. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Dec 4, 2008

    I was thinking about it and realize you probably meant a book for the whole class, not a book for each child.

    Anyway, pick a topic you have learned about and have each child write a sentence about the topic. Have them illustrate their picture and then make it into a book. I use construction paper and glue the pages on the front and back so it turns like a real book. I also do an "about the authors" page in the back, and a table of contents in the front, as well as a title page so the book has all the proper elements.

    So think of something you are learning about is social studies or science. You can make a web with the kids, or something like that before you begin. We just did one on Native Americans. I had the kids in 4 groups. As a class we read these little readers from A-Z reading on the food, the people, houses and dolls. When we were done, I had them choose one of those topics to write about. They picked one and wrote a sentence similar to the one in the book and drew a picture.

    We will do the same thing with the presidents and money in a couple weeks. We are reading about Lincoln, Washington, Jefferson and Roosevelt. I will have them pick on president and in small groups they will write and illustrate a fact about the president, so it will be like this:
    Abraham Lincoln is on the penny. Abe Lincoln was the 16th president. Abe Lincoln wore a tall hat. He kept notes in it. He lived in a log cabin when he was a boy... or something like that. Each page will be written by a child and illustrated by that child. Normally, I would expect a half page or 3-4 sentences from my kids, but when we do these little books and things, it's only been about a sentence each. Otherwise they would repeat themselves too much from author to author and the book would be boring!

    Another idea that I did around halloween was have each child write a halloween story. (You could do a holiday story.) In these stories, we really did write a full story (beginning, middle and end, 3-7 sentences or so for most kids.) They did a beautiful painting to go along with the story and we published them in a book that the class called "Halloween Stories: The Scariest Book!"
     
  6. snickydog

    snickydog Groupie

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    Dec 4, 2008

    I like the ideas on Jessica Meacham's site:

    http://www.jmeacham.com/shared.writing/shared.writing.class.books.htm

    They're good for teaching sight words and correlate with themes and seasons. You could adapt any of them to teach sight words and such. We do a book every week and a half or so. We use chart paper to come up with the sentences the students want (I use predictable phrases, but you could alter that). Then, I type them and cut them into single words, putting each kid's words for their sentence in a labeled envelope. Then they piece together the sentence, glue it down, and illustrate it. The kids LOVE checking out the class books from the library, and can easily read them independently due to the repeated phrases.
     

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