proofreading chaos!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by english9teach, Apr 20, 2007.

  1. english9teach

    english9teach Rookie

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    Apr 20, 2007

    I have tried several methods to conduct student proofreading throughout the year and nothing has kept my room from becoming a loud, chaotic mess. I assign partners (the kids don't get to pick), I have handed out rubrics and graded proofreading skill. Stil, the majority to kids get off focus. Any suggestions?
     
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  3. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Apr 20, 2007

    Are you talking about proof reading essays? Proper grammar, synatax, word choice, spelling, etc. is important but many English teachers take off way too much becuase of these mistakes. My own son is a prime example. My son is an excellent writer, he just thinks of something and is able to write wonderful essays. He is a natrually good writer and has reiceived an advanced scores on his MCAS exams, gets As on his essay for his history teacher, and for English his teacher last year. But now with his new English teacher he is reciving solid Bs and most of the time it is not becuase of his essays content but rather becuase of a few minor synax errors on TIMED WRITES in class. He recieved a 70% on an essay and the only "negative comment" was that there was Syntax problems, I am sorry but that is not grounds for a C. Just think about how much empasis you are putting on spelling.
     
  4. english9teach

    english9teach Rookie

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    Apr 23, 2007

    In Kentucky (where I work), we have rubrics that include all parts of the work. Writing works are graded equally on content and syntax. I absolutely agree that content is a big part of essay writing, but syntax does count. It is important for students to understand the writing process in general.

    I know that my students have heard about the writing process since fourth grade based on our state's testing standards, but I'm not seeing it right now.
     
  5. BeckyPie7

    BeckyPie7 Companion

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    Apr 23, 2007

    Oh dear, this is a hard one and I'm going to have to watch this post for advice. I've done peer editing a number of times in my 9th and 10th grade english classes. As a rule, I don't take off an incredible amount for spelling, grammar, ect. but want them to be able to work in groups and do peer editing. It's part of the SOLs. It's so hard to keep them on task. I've done worksheets, rubrics, detailed instructions. They never seem to understand what I'm having them do. Next time I was thinking about doing an anticipatory set before they peer edit. I'd have statements on a sheet of paper saying things like "It's not at all important to writing to have correct spelling..." ect and have them rank it on a scale of 1-10. After that we'd discuss it and I'd give the instructions for the assignment. I'll see how that works and let you know. This is a tough one for me too!.
     
  6. english9teach

    english9teach Rookie

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    Apr 23, 2007

    Ooooh... I like that anticipatory set. I'll have to try that. Maybe we can compare notes. Thanks!
     
  7. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Apr 23, 2007

    Not that this is helpful, but I've gotten so frustrated with peer editing and revision that I've stopped it completely! I found that it created more problems than it solved. I conference with the kids during our workshop time and give them specific things to look for in their own papers.
     
  8. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    Apr 26, 2007

    I use a method called "Clocking" that I learned many years ago. It lets the kids get up and move around, which helps (a little) with the noise and confusion. If the steps below don't make sense to you, feel free to email me: Valerie_Pope@birdville.k12.tx.us I'll also include a sample clocking sheet. Keep in mind, though, that it can be changed to reflect what you want them to edit for.

    1. Arrange the desks in two circles, one facing the other.
    2. Each student (with essay, clocking sheet, and pen/pencil) should be facing his or her partner.
    3. Remind the students what they should be looking for in step 1. Answer any questions they have, then tell them how much time they will have to read for xyz.
    4. Set the timer.
    5. At the end of the alloted time, have the "editors" give the "writers" back their papers. The students on the outside of the circle move one space to their left (clockwise).
    6. Repeat steps 3-5 for as many items as you want them to edit for.

    clocking sheet
     
  9. english9teach

    english9teach Rookie

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    Apr 26, 2007

    I shall try it. TY!! :)
     
  10. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    Apr 26, 2007

    Where in KY are you? I grew up in Northern KY.
     

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