Project approach! Let's learn together!

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by msj, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Sep 11, 2008

    Today I read a ladybug page from a scholastic bug book. We webbed what we know about ladybugs then drew pictures.

    I have The Ladybug Lifecycle Series, and Labybug from the Heinemann coming early next week along with the Ladybug larvae and habitat.

    I hope to visit the local nursery and have an empoyee describe how ladybugs work, what they eat, and where they live and take some back to our playground.

    I'd also like to visit the local farm. They release ladybugs on the crops for the kids to see. My Kindergarten teachers do not want us to go because they want to go there. :dizzy:
     
  2. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Sep 11, 2008

    they go there for ladybugs or for pumpkins? i will think of more field trips. do you have a "school garden" you could make one in a kiddie pool? getting it going could work into a trip somewhere.
     
  3. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Sep 11, 2008

    Both. We tour the crops: tomatoes, green beans, corn, cucumbers, and strawberries. At one point they bring out ladybugs and put them on our arms and explain how the ladybugs are good for the crops. We watch them fly off. We pick beans or cucumbers, then walk to the pumpkin patch.

    I found another farm we can visit for crops, but they don't do the ladybug thing.

    We have a rose garden near attached to our campus where we can release the ladybugs. I have a few planters in my playground for planting. Its kind of late in the year for veggies. OMG I just remembered we have a garden attached to our campus- 20 feet from my back door. We can release them there!!!!!
     
  4. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Sep 11, 2008

    You can release there, but you could also add a planter or whatever of dedicated ladybug habitat so that they "may stay with us". That would mean you would need to know about them-hence the studies. and that would take you to the rose bushes. Then the kids in kinder would really understand what they are doing there rather than just be standing there w/bugs on their arms. now it is a review for them?
     
  5. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Sep 12, 2008

    Dzenna-

    today in the school garden we say 200 million aphids and the child I was with remember we needed lady bugs. Well then we found some on the same plant. Then-Then we found eggs!!! I though of you!!



    We went to the lib today to find the books for our horse unit. You would have thought that they hadn't ever seen a book-they were so excited. We go 2x a month, but this was important business since it was thier topic!!
     
  6. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Sep 12, 2008

    :lol: We are in need of aphids! I asked a few parents at Back to School night last night. Hopefully we'll get some next week. The rose bushes on campus are tended to daily. Not an aphid to be found! I wish I could say the same as the roses in my home....aphids, mold and rust. I no longer have them.

    Well, the project seems to be working! Today we watched a ladybug/farm video on United Streaming. Afterward, three boys drew ladybugs "eating the bad bugs" in their journals!

    We are going to visit a nursery. I was planning to wait to buy supplies for our terrarium, but we'll buy plants for a ladybug habitat and have the nursery worker explain ladybugs' importance to us.

    One of my books, The Ladybug, arrived today. It's a great book. I am embarrassed to say I had no idea ladybugs hibernated! When we webbed on child said ladybugs are orange when they are young. She was correct!

    We are located near several stables. We even have a therapeutic riding stable nearby. That may be a great idea for a field trip. There are horse vets, trainers and groomers you can visit.
     
  7. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Sep 13, 2008

    way back in the thread i said it could bring a whole new meaning to hibernate. that is what i meant. sorry you didn't get it. we always talk about bears hibernating, but they do too. under logs and in cracks in trees.

    I think that stable idea is a great field trip. I will call around. Thanks. Vet-that is a good extension too.
     
  8. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Oct 2, 2008

    Follow Up on Ladybug Project

    Well, we finished up today and I was pleasantly surprised. I made a lot of changes since I last posted. First, we webbed what we knew about ladybugs and drew pictures of ladybugs. Second, we read a few books and watched a few streaming videos. Then, we observed the larva, pupa, ladybugs.

    Today we webbed and drew again. I was amazed at the knowledge. Some took in such minor details. Most know about eggs, larva, pupa and ladybug parts. We released the ladybugs in our playground underneath an orange tree. They did not fly away quickly and the children were so gentle and nurturing.

    Plants are next. We will web again next week. We planted carrots and radishes in an outdoor rootview and planters. I'll bring carrots and radishes while ours are developing.

    We will visit a pumpkin patch/farm in mid-October. It is different from the one I wanted to visit. We are focusing on plants.
    We also made the terrarium without visiting the nursery. We have crickets as there. The children are very curious. We've been doing some reading and comparisons/contrasts between ladybugs and crickets.

    I am most amazed at how the children have grown in their ability to express themselves through drawing. I have always looked at Reggio art and marveled at the details. My children's growth was fantastic. Some had such detail, others grew from scribbles to circles with six legs and black dots.
     
  9. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Oct 3, 2008

    I was Just thinking of you.....that is so funny.

    We finished horses too.

    It was so fun, the horse project began about the same time our biggest children started leaving us for elm school (we are very combined remember?). In the extra space the preschoolers felt very free and began to explore w/enthusiasum. We discovered that the stick horses were again the first item that the children went to (they had been for a while, but it was summer and hard to tell if they were playing or just running). Since many of them had just been to the fair, and we were going to begin talking about orchards and pumpkins staff and I jumped on it.

    We were able to borrow a saddle from a neighboring child care provider and with the presentation of the invitation to ride we drew them into the lesson. We webbed and found out that they children could predict, with great accuracy, many details in horse life based on prior projects differentation birds from mammals (chicks and bunnies). That was a wonderful find. We discovered they didn't really understand how big they were, what they ate and were quite interested to know if they would be brave enough to ride one.

    We began reading and drawing and decided horses were really hard to make. We discovered a way to use a hand print to approximate a horse, got stamps stickers and stencils. Then away we went into art work.

    One of our staff members was able to find us a family member that had horses to brush and the aunt was nice enough to let us ride!!! We even brought the schoolers. The were very excited to be included by the littles and it helped them see worth in the small children. Great social emotional. The preschoolers informed them they knew all the parts of a saddle and how to ride and the schoolers had a lot of make up work to do. The schoolers did it!!

    We counted, sorted, read, and sang about horses and now we know so much more than we used to!! We re webbed and I was so amazed.

    We are looking for our new topic now. It maybe forest, or pumpkins.
     
  10. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Oct 3, 2008

    Dzenna

    did your children see yet that the cricket and mantis have different life stages than ladybugs? no larvae.
     
  11. Dzenna

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    Oct 5, 2008

    Thanks for the tip! I got the crickets to put into the terrarium. My aide picked up a few cricket books. We looked at one on Thursday.
    They are aware of the 6 legs, antennae and strong jaws. They love the idea that crickets have ears on their legs!! I'll make sure to make a point of discussing the life stages.

    The horse project sounds fantastic!
     
  12. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Oct 5, 2008

    Thanks

    :2up:The horse project was really fun.

    Would you have your children find out for me if crickets are benificial in a garden or a pest? What do they do when they are outside? What is their job? I have always wondered about them. :confused:

    What are you going to do for your plant lesson-did you make your chart yet?

    I am going to bait mine into nocturnal animals since they seem to have ridden the horses into the forest-
     
  13. Dzenna

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    Oct 5, 2008

    From just glancing at the books, there are a several types of crickets. I'll look closer to see if any are beneficial. I know one burrows. The house cricket does nothing, but eats crumbs.

    Mine love nocturnal animals. Ladybugs are diurnal, crickets are nocturnal!

    I am going to bait mine into plants: fruits and vegetables. We will focus on roots, leaves, and seeds.

    I am waviering on studying bees. It will kind of continue with the insect theme. We have bees in our playground due to the orange tree. The kids are really interested in bees. I found a local beekeeper. We have no kids with allergies, but I am a little afraid of a sting. Last year I brought in some honeycomb and they loved it.

    I just got back from northern CA. I picked up an insect domino game, a ladybug, beetle, and grasshopper model, and an incredible book on insects.
     
  14. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Oct 6, 2008

    Your "field trip" could be to the honey part of the store not the bee keepers boxes or to farmers market type locale - since you have sort of accomplished the "bee's job" part of the hypothetical lesson.

    Bees could take you into the green movement for the winter. you know recycling and so on. There is a huge bee trauma now a days and I hear that CA is really up on the details. So would the bee keeper be.

    i wouldn't give up just due to the sting. Just take the trip in a different tanget?

    An orange tree!! wow. We are getting colder and leaves are falling. We are still in sweatshirts though.
     
  15. Dzenna

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    Oct 7, 2008

    It's still pretty warm here. It was in the 80's today. No falling leaves yet. I'm ready for cooler temperatures!
     

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