Prof. still hasn't graded my final.

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by kellzy, Dec 18, 2017.

  1. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    1,304

    Dec 21, 2017

    Some people just blindly support the teacher/professor even when they are in the wrong. For example, students get penalized for being late but if the teacher is late because of a “family issue” or “traffic” it’s okay. But if the student says the same thing, it’s detention or an unexcused tardy or a lecture by the front office staff. (My colleagues are late all the time and still lecture students for being late. Hypocrites.) Speaking of which, students have to turn in their assignments on their due dates, but teachers/professors can’t grade within a reasonable amount of time. Really?!

    I grade EVERY single assignment that my students turn in the SAME day I receive them, whether it’s a test, quiz, project, homework assignment, warm-up, whatever. It’s not hard. You just do it.

    I once had a professor at the University of California school I went to for undergrad take almost 1.5 months to grade a multiple choice exam WITH 10 TA’s. I ended up getting fed up and emailing the dean of the college and all of a sudden the grades were in the next day. Imagine that! That must have been so hard to grade multiple-choice tests. Oh, the horror.

    Ridiculous.
     
    Leaborb192 likes this.
  2. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,713

    Dec 21, 2017

    I was under the impression that teachers at your private school are living embodiments of poise and perfection. Is this not accurate? Are your school's administrators ineffective when it comes to holding teachers to their professional obligations?

    It's literally impossible to give good feedback on certain types of student products. An English teacher grading a 15-page paper can't possibly grade 150-200 papers in a single day.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2017
    teacherintexas, dgpiaffeteach and a2z like this.
  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,660
    Likes Received:
    2,897

    Dec 21, 2017

    I was always taught to turn in my best work, including proofing it multiple times BEFORE submitting it for grading. In elementary and even high school, the reason for being able to correct mistakes is to learn from those mistakes. As a grad student, my impression is that the work should exhibit all of the hallmarks of mastery when submitted. By the time you have gone through college for your undergrad, and then moved into grad school, you should have a strong grasp of how to write the paper. I would not be inclined to allow grad students to "fix" their papers once they were submitted. As a grad student, it is all on the student's shoulders to understand the scope of the work assigned, by astute questioning when the paper was assigned, and then use personal judgement and learned writing skills to present a polished paper. I know that is the reason that I routinely revise over and over before submitting. Once that paper goes in, the time to seek clarification, perform revisions, etc., is past. I don't think I would be a flaky professor, but I might be considered strict. We don't like getting a grade lower than we hoped, but in truth, sometimes we have simply been overly optimistic about the outcome, and we find out that reality is different from our grandiose plans.

    That's just real life. I've had professors who refuse to return submitted work, simply to keep the papers from being sold on the internet. I believe there is validity to that school of thought.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
    futuremathsprof, a2z and Caesar753 like this.
  4. kellzy

    kellzy Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2013
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    92

    Dec 21, 2017

    When I was learning to drive a stick shift I spent more time with the engine stalled than I spent moving. When I was learning to quilt, the time was spent with my grandmother over my shoulder correcting every move I made. I probably owe my district a free year of teaching for how much I messed up my first year. Real learning is a process. It's not something that you are perfect at the first time. I tell my students that: I'm here to help you grow. Don't be afraid of making a mistake, that's one of the best ways to help me understand what you don't understand. I'm open with my students when I make a mistake. I'll apologize to them, if it was a major one that made their lives more difficult, and if it was a mistake with something I was teaching I'll explain my mistake to them, tell them even adults mess up, now you know not to make the mistake I made, and we all understand this a little better because we noticed a mistake. I don't silence my students when they think I've made a mistake. I'll think about it, and if I agree with them, I'll point it out to everyone, if I disagree I'll explain why.

    If you're not making mistakes, you're not learning. In my grad program that's one of the biggest ways we are evaluated-a willingness to accept our mistakes, learn from them and grow. In fact, in many of the courses in my grad program it's impossible to get a passing grade without multiple submissions of the same paper with multiple editing attempts. In another course I took this semester I have a folder labeled with each submission, the date and the number submission it was. I submitted that paper a total of 14 times before that professor declared it of acceptable work. The professors of these particular classes will tell the students on the first day: they want you to review and try again because that's how high level academia works.

    That's real life.
     
    Leaborb192 likes this.
  5. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,330
    Likes Received:
    2,219

    Dec 21, 2017

    Professors in college always encouraged us to bring in our work for review or questions, but once submitted that was it. There were no re-writes. We were expected to know how to write by the time we got to college. If you did not know how, you were expected to be meeting with the professor during office hours or other agreed to times if schedules did not match.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,660
    Likes Received:
    2,897

    Dec 21, 2017

    Ditto.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,330
    Likes Received:
    2,219

    Dec 21, 2017

    This is just not true. One can learn from mistakes, but mistakes aren't required for learning. For example, someone can show me how to make a cake. I may never have made one. I can follow the instructions given and produce a perfect cake. I learned how to do something I did not know before and made no mistake.

    The logic in your statement is in error, and I hope you aren't teaching your students this quote because it is just wrong.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2007
    Messages:
    14,606
    Likes Received:
    2,713

    Dec 21, 2017

    Learning is a process, yes, but completed products that are meant to demonstrate mastery should be the culmination of that process.
     
    vickilyn and a2z like this.
  9. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    1,304

    Dec 21, 2017

    Whoops, *some* teachers are late (2-3 teachers out of the entire staff).

    I agree about the English papers. However, most assignments don’t require much work grading-wise.
     
  10. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,485
    Likes Received:
    1,027

    Dec 21, 2017

    My policy is a simple one: "I can not give you any new assessments until you've gotten the previous one returned."
     
    Leaborb192 and futuremathsprof like this.
  11. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4,398
    Likes Received:
    1,304

    Dec 21, 2017

    This is an excellent policy to abide by.
     
    Leaborb192 likes this.
  12. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2002
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    38

    Dec 29, 2017

    Professors differ just like classroom teachers differ. The professors that I have learned the most from are those who have workshopped papers with us. Sometimes that has been with classmates or the professor him/herself. Just like a professor submits an article to a journal, it will come back with edits or corrections to be made.

    This last semester I had a prof who would grade papers, but not in the order you submitted them.We had to write reflections, but he didn't grade them weekly. Sometimes, you would get 2 or 3 grade back at one time. Or get the current week's reflection but not the previous weeks' reflections. Yes, it is frustrating.

    Take those lessons and learn from them.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. stargirl,
  2. Joshkidam123
Total: 165 (members: 2, guests: 142, robots: 21)
test