Privileges and the Perpetually Tardy

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Backroads, Nov 20, 2019.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Nov 20, 2019

    My school likes the students to take turns leading the Pledge each morning. This is done by rotating weekly by class. I'm nearing the end of my student list to lead the Pledge on my weeks, but I am anticipating a problem.

    I have a boy who is perpetually tardy. In fact, it's a surprise if he's on time. He's usually around 20-40 minutes late. It's a great family, but they just happen to struggle with being on time. (Now if you're thinking that this is of greater importance than saying the Pledge, well, he's basically missing role call/class set up and part of specials, judge that how you will).

    His usual time of arrival is far after the Pledge time and I find myself doubting he will ever be on time during one of my weeks to be eligible to lead the Pledge.

    If he were even a grade older than 1st, I'd say it's just one of those consequences and a privilege missed. But it is first grade and I would hate to have one kid who never gets to say the Pledge all year.

    I've toyed with the idea of sending home a reminder the day before to see if that would help, but I still have many doubts.

    Should I try to make this happen? Should I just let it go?
     
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Nov 20, 2019

    Personally, I'd just let it go. But, if you really want to, I think it's fine to send home a note or email the day before. Then, if he is still late, know that you did what you could, and let it go.
     
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  4. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Nov 20, 2019

    Oh, let it go. If they can't get him there on time, that is their issue. Don't make it yours.
     
  5. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Nov 21, 2019

    Aside from some unavoidable situations, for most families, if they would just start a bit earlier in the morning, they'd be there on time. Often this involves turning off the TV or now-a-days the computer and hitting the hay. The big culprit is the brain, that fools itself every night into thinking they'll still have enough sleep if they wait a few more minutes, or especially in the morning, when the snooze button gets pushed and pushed and pushed again. This is not a deficiency in the brain, it's part of the advantages to a living brain as opposed to a robotic program, but the disadvantage is when we don't take it a step further and decide on a specific bedtime and get-up time. The greater disadvantage comes from the rushing in the morning, the scolding the kids for not being faster than lightning, the scarfed breakfast (if any), hardly an efficient preparation for a first grade brain for the rest of the school day. Far better would be allowing plenty of time to get up and wake up, perhaps playing some music in the morning during breakfast, eating a good breakfast, etc. A good tip is to think the start of the day as 7:00 pm rather than 6:30 am. Have all that is needed ready to go. Better yet, keep stuff that goes in backpacks or pockets in the same spot all the time, perhaps a special drawer. But back to the original question, and off my rabbit trail, I don't think I'd sacrifice the schedule for just one student's tardiness. Perhaps on those days, the teacher can lead the pledge. I don't think I'd send a note home to encourage special promptness on those days, either, as that will most likely be an increased stress factor in the student's morning ritual.
     
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  6. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Nov 21, 2019

    The reminder is a good idea. Maybe a letter addressed to the whole class so they don't think they are singled out. There's no better time like the present to work on getting to school on time.
     
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  7. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Cohort

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    Nov 22, 2019

    I think of it as a natural consequence. It isn't the kid's fault, but if you are not there, you can't do it. 20-40 minutes late is too late for me. Judging, sorry! :) It might be a great family, but they need to get it together. By writing a reminder, it is almost like saying every day is not important like this 1 day.
    I have had older kids come to school after being absent who are kind of huffy in the past because we did something w/out them. I tell them if you were here you could have done it too, but we are not going to wait for you to come to school! :) Usually it is the kids who are absent without cause. ( They wanted to go shopping w/ their mom, get a new haircut, or veg out in front of the computer all day.!)
     
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  8. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Nov 24, 2019

    You might reach out to the parents and note it, and try to figure out whether they (or he) cares first. If they don't, there's not much you can do.
     

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