Private School from Public School

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by Guest, Aug 4, 2002.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 4, 2002

    I have been a fifth grade teacher for five years in public schools, all title one low income schools. I am starting this year in a private school with very high standards and extremely interested parents. I am a little worried about the difference in schools. Any ideas or experience?
     
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  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 4, 2002

    I have also just accepted a job teaching in a private school. I have just graduated, so this is my first job. I know that the demand from parents and staff seems overwhelming! But, for me, everyone seems to be concerned and really wants to help. So, I'm trying to look to this as a positive..and hope that its a good thing, rather than not!
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 4, 2002

    I taught for five years in a public school in the afernoons and mornings in a private school. Now I am in a private school only. I chose private school for reilgious reasons and it has been an absolute blessing. The parents are totally different, they have chosen to pay for their child's education so you know they are making a sacrifice for their child to be there. It is so nice. I would say be yourself, yes the expectations are far greater, but the benefits are too (as well as the teacher gifts :) Relax and enjoy!!
     
  5. musicbug

    musicbug Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2002

    I taught in private schools early on my first years teaching. The kids are fine. Most of the parents are cooperative and helpful. Be prepared to go over and beyond. Without public school funding the extras depend on you( extras often include everything from the fine arts, computer literacy,PE;as well as all extra afterschool activities. It will be a great experience. I found I couldn't live on private school salaries so I had to move on to the public schools.
     
  6. helpinghand

    helpinghand Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2002

    I taught in public school first. I also taught in a similarly described school to the one you taught in. This school year will be my second year teaching in private. I was worried, because I really enjoyed teaching the students who needed me for so much in the public school I taught. I found out that students from all backgrounds and all amounts of parental support need many things. so, I was just as challenged.

    It was great not to have as much paperwork. There was so much more time to devote to actually teaching in private school. The less demanding schedule was so much more nurturing to my family. Changing to a private school proved to be a great unexpected blessing. ;)
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 5, 2002

    I have only taught in private schools and am very pleased. The atmosphere is family-like, there is a great deal of respect and children can be children. Though I realize my school is unique, private schools in general have so much more flexibility than public. Our teachers can personalize lessons to their strengths, change curriculum emphasis, spend more time with students. Parents can be demanding at times, sometimes you get more students who are sensitive, but everything is very manageable with a small group size and small school size. I wouldn't want it any other way.
     
  8. kelly

    kelly Guest

    Aug 6, 2002

    I have been teaching in a private school for 12 years and love every minute of it. THe class size is much smaller than the public school. This year I will have 15 students! Parents are very involved, sometimes too much. Some need to be reminded who is the professional, but if you let them know at Open house that you need them to help it will work out. I also ask for bags of candy, popcorn and stickers. I always end up with more than enough for the year. Yes the salary is only 75% of the public schools, but I feel that the other benefits outweigh the money issue.

    My only problem is my husband who feels that I wasted 4 years of college to only make in the $20's for 12 years. I don't see it as a money issue at all. I love the small atmosphere, faculty, students and parents. What more could you ask for. I am anxious to start this year!
     
  9. pmts02

    pmts02 Guest

    Aug 6, 2002

    I have taught in private school for 4 years. I love it. Wouldn't trade it for anything. The classes are small, the parents are more involved and want to help out. They are always supportive from day one. They have to pay for thier child's education so they cooperate wherever and whenever needed. You don't have to struggle for them to help their child at home. They will help because its thier money they are wasting if they don't do thier part. Have fun, be yourself and you will love it!!
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 8, 2002

    You are right about the salary issue ($23K here). I make up some of the difference by tutoring after school and even Saturdays. I make about $600 a month and could make more if I wanted to.

    I agree with pmts also - the parents are usually super cooperative and supportive at my school. Though there are some .......

    Enjoy!
     
  11. helpinghand

    helpinghand Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2002

    After School Tutoring

    How do you find students for after school tutoring , and what are your rates? I tried to start tutoring last year, but I was n't paid consistently.
     
  12. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 9, 2002

    Helping - My school sets forth its policy in the handbook, though individual tutoring is an agreement between parent and teacher. The suggested rate is $25 per hour. I charge $30 per session for a dyslexic child who I see 4 or 5 days a week. They have to pay even if he is absent or can't make it for any reason (other than holiday). In the summer, I charged $25 /1 hr; $30 1 1/4 hrs; $40 1 1/2 hrs. I worked 3 half-days a week.
    To handle the situation of someone not paying, after 3 unpaid sessions or so, I send a note saying that I know they will want to continue tutoring after we have brought their account current. Then I don't tutor again until they do so. My daily tutoring student pays 10 weeks in advance - believe it or not - and Mom says, "Tell me when you need more". I love that.
    The school doesn't take a percentage and it helps to establish great relationships with students. You can just offer it as an option when a student's grades are not what they could be and you feel that in-class strategies have not been sufficient.

    Debbie
     
  13. 5leafclover

    5leafclover Companion

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    Aug 9, 2002

    In my state, Georgia, it's illegal for a teacher to tutor their own students for money.
     
  14. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 10, 2002

    Thanks Debbie for the detailed information. I will not be titoring my own students for charge. I usually offer a study hall in the morning before school and in the afternoon afterschool once a week for students who are having problems. That usually helps.

    But I have been asked to tutor others who are students at other schools, so I really needed that info. The idea for the not home for delinquent payments and the idea for wording was very helpful.

    Thanks.
     
  15. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 10, 2002

    Well, Mr Reitz, public school can't do it here in FL either, but I'm in private. I also plan to offer (unpaid) assistance to any student who asks for help during recess.
     

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