principal observation!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by 2nd grade teach, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. 2nd grade teach

    2nd grade teach Rookie

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    Jan 21, 2007

    I am a first year teacher, and the principal needs to observe me. I can do the lesson on anything, but it makes me nervous! She has always made a big deal about writing instruction and also teaching character to the students. I teach 2nd grade, does anyone have any creative lessons for either one of those topics, or any other topic?
     
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  3. TXTeacher4

    TXTeacher4 Companion

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    Jan 22, 2007

    I had to do that last year and I was nervous too. Just a suggestion for you... Don't do anything over the top. She wants to see how you really teach. Try not to show how nervous you are. The kids will pick up on it. Have fun and let her see how much the kids enjoy learning with you.

    You can do a mini lesson on a character trait (courage, honesty, respect, responsibility) and then have them write about a time they showed that trait. Good luck!
     
  4. ctopher

    ctopher Comrade

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    Jan 22, 2007

    I would share a book or portion of a book with the class.....maybe a Kevin Henkes title and talk about the character traits of one of the characters in the story. Then you might want to give the students an outline of one of the characters and have them brainstorm words that describe that character and then they can write about how they are similar and different to that character.
     
  5. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Jan 22, 2007

    Whatever you choose to do, make it something that is similar to lessons you've done in the past. Don't put on a dog and pony show for the principal, it will show. Besides, if it is a type of lesson that you and your students haven't done, you will both be uncomfortable. When I am going to be observed, I'll tell them if it is a test, otherwise, I just do what I normally had planned for the day. Take a deep breath and just do a normal, everyday lesson. Good luck!!
     
  6. kburen

    kburen Cohort

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    Jan 22, 2007

    Do what you normally do. You never know when your principal is going to walk in to visit or observe and it may not look great on you if you go all out when you know she's coming in, and then are doing "normal" things when she just pops in. My principal is always in and out of our rooms. When she told me that she needed to come in and observe a lesson and asked when I wanted her to come, I told her just to come in whenever she got the time. I don't prepare special lessons. If I'm going to be doing something different or something that I know she would enjoy I tell her about it and invite her to come in.
     
  7. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Jan 22, 2007

    Our principal is always in and out of our rooms doing drive by's. At least that's what we call them. She stops in for 5-10 minutes to observe us and fill out a little bit of paperwork.
    I'm doing my last formal observation this Thursday (yeah!!!) and am doing it in Math. Math is a very structured time, and is easy to fill out those never ending observation sheets that you have to fill out for the formal observations.

    If you want to do a writing lesson, it would be helpful to know what you've already taught or what comes up next in your curriculum.
     
  8. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Jan 22, 2007

    ADD ON IDEA:I always start the year with Bill Cosby's book The Meanest Thing You Can Say.
    For those of you not familiar with it, it is about a little boy who goes
    to school and the new kid says "Lets play a game about who can say the
    meanest things to each other." The little boys dad convinces him that the
    best thing he can say is SO because there is no defense for SO.
    We practice this for the first couple of weeks and then anytime we have
    someone saying hurtful things to other people. The kids love it and they
    want to be picked on. I will pick a child who wants to be the person
    and I stand there and look them over carefully and then I say something like
    "Blue hair barrets! Cool people only wear red ones" The kid will giggle and
    say "SO"( by the way it has to be done with an attitude of indifference and
    style) Then I looked shocked and say "Well you are not cool if you don't
    wear red ones" "So" "Well you can't be my friend then." "So" By now the
    whole class is laughing and saying "So" Then on the playground when a child
    comes up and says "He called my stupid." I just say what
    >do you say? "So" That right there is no answer to
    "So" and you know it isn't true. I teach 2nd and I now have 5th graders that
    will be standing with me when someone runs up and says He called me______ and they will turn around and say "Just say so there's no answer
    to so. Elaine /nv/2
    After reading the story, everyone sits in a circle and you have a large
    paper cutout of a girl. Everyone gets the "girl" and wads or folds a piece
    of her. At the end needless to say she's in bad shape. Explain that every time
    they do this to her it's the same as saying something hurtful to her. Try to
    smooth her out and explain that even though she can be smoothed
    back out the wrinkles are still there, just like even though someone can
    apologize and be forgiven, the hurtful marks are still left on us. It was a
    big hit. I hope my explanation is clear, kind of hard to put into words.
     
  9. Luvin5th

    Luvin5th Rookie

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    Jan 22, 2007

    Another great book for character is When Sophie Gets Angry, Really, Really, Angry.... by Molly Bang. It is a Caldecott award winner. It helps to teach about self control and ways of dealing with angry feelings. It is perfect for K - 2. I have a lesson plan that I wrote when I was in the teacher ed program a couple of years ago, if you would like a copy. Of course, you would probably want to add to it. At any rate, anything you do should be comfortable for you. It might seem difficult at first, but you will get used to being observed. This is only my first year, but my Principal and Vice Principal pop in all of the time unannounced (I think I like it better this way!) When I was student teaching I was observed by the superintendent... talk about nervous.

    The bottom line is, this person hired you, she is already in your corner. You don't have to wow her, you just have to show her that she was right about you all along!

    Send me a private message if you want that lesson plan.
     
  10. 2nd grade teach

    2nd grade teach Rookie

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    Jan 23, 2007

    I would love to see the lesson! Thanks!

    Thank you everyone for your ideas!
     
  11. Luvin5th

    Luvin5th Rookie

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    Jan 23, 2007

    I sent it to you via private post! Best Wishes!
     

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