preschool SCREAMER

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by SpecialPreskoo, Aug 12, 2002.

  1. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Aug 12, 2002

    I need advice. I have a new preschool special ed. student. Actually I have 5 new ones so far but one REALLY takes the cake. She screams and squeals to hear herself do it and to get our attention sometimes. If we ignore her, she gets louder. Even when her throat starts hurting her, she continues at times. She also hits, spits, and throws toys and the other students aren't bothering her. She is basically non-verbal, well, minimal words and they aren't that clear. I know this was just the first day, but still. The other kids don't want her around them even when she isn't acting out. Time outs are more like a wrestling match. I try to chose my battles, but still, she doesn't need to spit, hit, throw toys or scream just because she can. I have other students that are sensitive to loud noises (autism and other disabilities). One would cry out everytime she screamed. To be honest, I don't think she was ever made to mind at home because she does have delays. My brother has Down's and he knew when to mind.

    Her parents are requesting her to have her own aide, but I don't see the board approving that. Lord knows it would be nice to have one person assigned to her. ANYWAY I'll hush for now. I guess this is a major vent session but it's been a LONGGGGGGGGGGGGGG DAY!

    Lori
     
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  3. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Aug 12, 2002

    OH! I would like advice that you have used in your room. I've seen that behavior solutions website. I would like to know what you've used and if it worked. I've read a lot of solutions. I want to know if something actually works... still venting...

    Lori
     
  4. AJK

    AJK Pre-k Montessori Teacher

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    Aug 18, 2002

    Hey Lori, how did the rest of the week go? Did she calm down?
     
  5. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Aug 18, 2002

    She got a smidge better. If she screamed, hit, shoved, spit, or threw a toy one of us would take her outside of the room and talk to her... tell her "we have to be nice" and softly rub her arm, "we have to be quiet" and put our finger over our lips and hers, "we don't spit" and put her hand over her mouth, etc. Now if it was a time when she was in the high chair (We have to put her in the high chair for any sit-down activity but table work time. She will sit then. If she screams out then, we tell her "we need to be quie", turn her around to where she can't see what is going on and put up cardboard dividers so if she turns around in her seat, she still can't see us. We give her 3 min. if she is quiet, we turn her back around and try again. We've learned we can't take her out of the chair to go outside and have to have that talk. Getting her back in the chair for the rest of the task is like putting a wild cat in a tub of water.

    I know it is going to take time and I can't expect a miracle in the first 3 days. Thank goodness she DOES take a nap, after we play "wiggle worm" and try to get away from whoever lays (lies?) beside her at naptime to help her get calm and rested. Also thank goodness she only comes Mon-Wed. I have a new one on Thurs & Fri who is severely disabled and loud noises like a sneeze or cough can make her jump. Extremely loud and consistant startlements could even trigger a seizure. Let's home my screamer stops by next year. They will have to be on a few days together... no way around it.

    Wish me Luck! If anyone else has anymore ideas, I'd LOVE to hear it! :)

    THANKS AJ

    Lori
     
  6. Seich30

    Seich30 Comrade

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    Aug 19, 2002

    Sounds likke you are doing the right thing. I've been in similar situations before, but it was with children who were so low mentally that they couldn't hardly help it. I almost had to take the stance of do what was best for the rest of the children and feel bad about it in the process. Both of the children I'm referring to, were moved to units with smaller numbers the following year. If the child your dealing with is mentally capable to comply, then consistancy is your best option. Good Luck!!
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 19, 2002

    I hope things have gotten better by now. I had a student who was somewhat similar. He screamed and through tantrums to get his way. This continued for about 2 weeks. We had to put him in time out and ignore him. He would scream louder, but I would just talk louder and explain to the other children that he was having a bad day and needed some time to himself. After about 2 weeks, the tantrums and screaming began to lessen. After the first month or so, they stopped. He then began pouting if he didn't get his way. We didn't really give him a choice but to do what the rest of the class was doing. I now have another student who does not do the screaming but she is extremely oppositional. If she doesn't like what we're doing or even how you ask her to do something, she will refuse and there is no budging her. I am trying to make her feel as if she is helping me by doing what I am asking, but this doesn't always work. There are times when she just shuts down for the entire day and doesn't seem to care what everyone else is doing (she's 5 and coded developmentally delayed). I would appreciate any other ideas. Thanks and good luck!
     
  8. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Aug 19, 2002

    Today was better. She didn't scream no where near as much as last week but still had her moments. When she does pitch a major fit, you would think you were trying to bathe a wild cat in a tub of ice cold water. She goes ALL OVER the place. It's a good thing she isn't coated in baby oil, she'd slide all around the room when she had a fit.

    Part of her problem is... she is spoiled rotten, when she acts up around her mom, mom sorta laughs about it. I went to school with mom, she was in special ed. Mom sorta laughed about it when she was told that her child slapped the aide today... for no reason... she was not being provoked, made to do anything... just sitting too close. So, she's not made to mind at home... that is obvious. She's probably never been talked to even the slightest bit firm until now. Time-out, well, that is not possible right now... she goes into that wild cat state... well, she does with me anyway. She is responding better to "Shhh" with the finger at the lips, and "be nice". I don't mind the oppositional defiance... I HATE the screaming... that gives EVERYONE a headache. I had my ear plugs ready if the days didn't get better. She doesn't say much and what she does say isn't all that clear, but we have figure out "You mean", "I hate you" and we are pretty sure it's the B-word when she is REALLLLLLLLY mad at me. Luckily her speech isn't clear enough for the other kids to pick up on the bad words.


    All of my students are "developmentally delayed". I wish I could move her to another room, but I am the only preschool special ed teacher in our rural county. The positive thing... I will have her this year and next year... after that she moves up! Then someone else will fill her space. She replaced my sailor-mouthed fit pitcher I had last year. There's always one it seems.

    ANYWAY... I can tell things are getting better.

    Lori
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Aug 26, 2002

    thats amazing how her mom could laugh at things that her daughter does. Well then again you cant be too suprised if she were in special ed as well.
     
  10. Shea Logan

    Shea Logan Rookie

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    Sep 20, 2002

    RE: SCREAMER

    I know what you are going through, as I went through it 2 years ago. My class is the only autistic class in our school, and it is in the regular ed hallway. The screaming was very disruptive for my students, and our hallway neighbors as well.

    I usually make a list of the student's behaviors. Next, I choose the behavior that is the most disruptive for the class (usually screaming). After this I do a reinforcement assessment to find what (tangibles, hugs, tickles, breaks) will be the most motivating for this student(Mini m&ms usuall work for me). Now it is time to catch the student being good. Use a timer and set it for about 5 minutes. If your screamer does not scream during that 5 minute interval, then she can be rewarded with her reinforcer. If she screams, then you called hold up a sad face and start the timer over again. Another idea is to take 3 pictures of her desired reinforcer. Laminate the pictures and velcro them to a clipboard. Set the timer for 5 minutes( or whatever you choose). Each time she screams, you can remove a picture. When the timer goes off, she can have her reinforcer if she still has a picture left on her clipboard.

    Good luck!

    ~Shea
     
  11. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Sep 21, 2002

    Well, last wednesday we finally found what worked. I went to the ED teacher across the hall and told her I was about at my wit's end and NEEDED some help. She suggested using one of the time-out rooms they use when kids constantly misbehave to isolate them away from the others. We tried it, she didn't like it, if she screamed, had a fall in the floor tantrum or ran away from us, she went to the time-out room. She went several times that day staying only 3 mins at a time unless she was still pitching a fit. As the day went on, if she screamed out and saw me headed to her, she knew where she was going and didn't want to go. Then Monday she didn't have to go as many times. (She only comes Mon-Wed.) We could say "do we need to go across the hall" and point that way or "do we need to go to the time-out room" and she'd say NO and get quiet. By this past Wednesday she only went 4 times all day. The ED teacher called it negative reinforcement. We tried all the other techniques from ignoring to rewarding and THAT was the only thing that worked and boy did it. If she knew we were right out side the door of the time out room, then she was act up more so we would step over to the side where she couldn't see us. Not only did it decrease the target behaviors DRAMATICALLY it also got rid of other non-target behaviors... her hitting all the kids, shoving them down and spitting. She even handed me her cup at the end of snack and lunch instead of giving it a whirl across the room. We put it in her IEP that the time-out room would be used and when to use it and the mom agreed. Mom checked out the room to make sure it wasn't a broom closet we were sticking her in and it isn't. Mom was satisfied. She drives her own mom batty with her screaming. I told her mom when she does it at home, seclude her in a room by herself with NO toys and no one to listen to her scream and act up. I hope she follows through at home for her sanity's sake. I know I regained my sanity. I went and got nerve pills because the earplugs weren't working. Things are soooooooooo much better in the classroom now. She is hugging the other students, even giving some a little kiss on the head... without shoving them down a split second later.

    Now that she is calmer, the others that didn't act up are starting too now she the screamer isn't getting all the attention. But their misbehavior is NOTHING compared to her screaming and making all of us go deaf or wish that we were already deaf.

    Lori
     
  12. hillsidefogo

    hillsidefogo Companion

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    Sep 30, 2002

    I'm glad things worked out for you and your screamer. I survived one last year, also developmentally and severely speech delayed. I think they scream so much because they are so frustrated about not being able to communicate clearly. I often wonder if other people realize how important it is to be consistent with your behavior mod. and also how hard it is to get through the first week or so. Your situation reminds me of the story "It Could Always be Worse". Congrats on a hard job well done! God Bless all Spec. Educ. teachers!
     

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