power struggle

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by mrsfroggey, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. mrsfroggey

    mrsfroggey Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 24, 2010

    I wanted to know if anyone has suggestions or tips for me. I have been teaching 4 years now at a title 1 school in first grade. I love my students but find quite often I end up in almost power struggles with certain students. I have a wide variety of students that include adhd, runners, violent, desk throwers, and the students you just think are perfect lol. I only have recess once a week so taking away recess isn't usually beneficial. A common practice at our school is for students to walk laps, usually during daily p.e. I do take students out of the activity if they can not control themselves and usually that works. But I do find sometimes it feels like a power struggle between me and certain students. Some students lose the privilege of a desk or chair if they can not sty seated or keep picking up their desk, etc, but some just don't care and I feel like I am out of options. Please any tips on what to do would be great. Generally my classroom is set on known expectations, treasure box once weekly and randomly for good students, positive redirection, I try and talk to the student causing trouble and depending on student that may or may not work. I usually write in planners and have parent sign but that rarely seems to work. I just want this year to get of to a good start. Any tips would be great thanks.
     
  2.  
  3. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    2,289
    Likes Received:
    120

    Jul 24, 2010

    Have you looked at Whole Brain Teaching? I think it makes a lot of sense.
     
  4. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 24, 2010

    Hmmm... how can you only have recess once a week with children this young? I would be power struggling too if I wasn't able to get outside and play more regularly.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 25, 2010

    I had the same problem my first year. One of my first graders was ED, and would lose control of himself, and another was a bully, who liked to egg the first kid on and pick fights with other kids (even taking girls' shoes!). I was bitten, hit, kicked, called everything but a "child of God," and had to clear my classroom several times because the ED child was throwing desks. Unfortunately, my administration was BONKERS, and did nothing but blame me. I tried all of the things you listed, to no avail. The bully's mom and I were even friendly, and talked regularly about his behavior (heck, she was a teacher! Finally, the president of our local union chapter went to the district offices and threatened to call the police if the bully wasn't pulled from my classroom. After he was gone, the ED child settled down (he was brilliant), and we had few problems!

    Luckily, I changed schools last year, and now have an administration with SOME SENSE! I am expected to handle things in my classroom, but it is a known fact that outrageous behavior is not tolerated at our school! (My P is a retired military, very present black man, and the kids actually respect him.) Interestingly, the demographics of the kids are exactly the same - same Title 1, urban, broken-family atmosphere. Thankfully, because there are higher expectations for our children -academically and behaviorally, we are backed up by the parents! Sorry for rambling - wanted you to know that you are NOT alone!
     
  6. Ms.Frizzle

    Ms.Frizzle Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 26, 2010

    try kindness coins

    I would increase the positives. Look at oriental trading website for "kindness coins" I fill an empty Peanut butter jar with them every year. I make a big deal out of an act of kindness. The student comes up sticks his hand in the jar and almost always asks me to read the coin aloud (there are several diff. quotes on the coins). The back of the coin then says "pass it on".
    The student is then given the responsibility to look for other acts of kindness and will reward a diff. student with the coin. The coins are inexpensive. 2 sets of them will get you through a year. The increase of positive recognition always seems to reduce the negative attention getting behavior. For a behavior problemed student it may be a turning event to earn one.:)
    They don't have a time limit on when they pass it on. Sometimes it is days but it does get passed on. I've even been given one by a student before. :)
     
  7. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,592
    Likes Received:
    4

    Aug 10, 2010

    You might try Preferred Activity Time (take a look at Tools for Teaching). You can make the PAT time focused on active games that involve music and dance-to help the children get chances to move around.

    I also if there are power struggles or arguments explain I do not argue with them, if they would like to discuss the issue at such and such time they are welcome to. If it continues on the spot then I would probably walk the little one down to the office at the next opportunity and discuss it with mom or dad. Done early in the year it keeps most of them from even attempting it.
     
  8. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    2,973
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 10, 2010

    Read Ross Greene's The Explosive Child.....
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. rpan,
  2. Shweta Basu
Total: 275 (members: 3, guests: 251, robots: 21)
test