Posting Survey Responses on my Website

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Peregrin5, Sep 24, 2016.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Sep 24, 2016

    At the end of every year, I give kids a survey about how the year went and their feelings about the class. This is completely anonymous but just helps me collect data about my practice.

    I'm actually pretty proud of my responses the last year, but I'm looking at the responses through the eyes of a teacher of 8th graders. Since it's an anonymous survey and I surveyed ALL of my students, I fully expected to receive less than stellar feedback from some of my students who were more preoccupied with my holding them accountable to the rules than with how much they learned. (i.e. students who say I'm too strict [or "strick" as they put it, lol] or complaining about how often they got sent to the focus table for misbehavior) But there were a lot of students (the large majority in fact) who provided very thoughtful responses about how much they learned in my class and how much they enjoyed being in my class.

    I would like to post this on my website, however if I do post it, I will probably have to post the entire thing, the good, bad, and the ugly without cutting things. I don't know if someone else might look at the responses and focus on the few bad ones without taking into account how many more good ones there are.

    Should I post all the feedback on my website for transparency? Or should I curate and just pick a few highlight responses? Or should I just not post survey responses at all? (They are anonymous, but maybe there's another reason I can't do that)
     
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  3. Tulipteacher

    Tulipteacher Companion

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    Sep 24, 2016

    What would the purpose be for posting the survey results? Who is the intended audience?

    I would definitely not post anything that could be perceived as negative. Say you post a result that says you're too strict and then a current student, parent, or admin who feels you're a little too strict sees that. The survey result just reinforces their negative perception and perhaps gives them ammunition.

    But I'm not sure why you'd post the positive stuff either. To me as a teacher and parent it would seem like tooting your own horn. I could possibly see posting something like, "Be prepared for our lab this week. Did you know this was the favorite activity of 75 percent of last year's class?"

    If the surveys give you valuable feedback then that's great. I don't think you need to do more with them.
     
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  4. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Sep 24, 2016

    I don't think you need them on your website.

    I do think it's a fun idea to collect them in the event that you want to create an online portfolio for a future job hunt.
     
  5. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    I also wouldn't post them. Use them for your personal insight.
     
  6. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    In addition to other thoughts, it seems to take away the aura of it being an "anonymous" survey - not in the literal sense of the word, but in the sense that others beyond just the teacher could possibly see their comments. It seems like a time where the risk outweighs the possible benefits.
     
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  7. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    Agree.

    If sharing it for other students to see, I'd share only collective data: 80% of students felt this course ___.
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Sep 24, 2016

    By website, I meant my online teaching portfolio. I created one when job hunting, and I think it helped me find a position rather quickly. It contained links to all of my curriculum, my teaching philosophy, classroom management plan, photos of students in action at my classroom (with signed permission of course), and my resume. I thought I would keep it up to date with the student feedback as well, but if this isn't a good idea, maybe I'll refrain.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2016
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  9. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    In that case, I think it's okay to anonymously post it. "This class was great!" - Student in my 8th grade biology class.
     
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  10. fjaravata

    fjaravata Rookie

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    Sep 30, 2016

    I think that you can filter out the negative comments, but you can also "answer" those comments with a reflection on what happened and how it can be improved. That is what is powerful with today's tech--you can interact with all comments (kinda like Yelp/Amazon) and identify any shortcomings if any. This shows that you do consider all comments and take to any kind of criticism well and how to improve as a teacher.
     

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