possibly going to jail...

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by ciounoi, Aug 23, 2011.

  1. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

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    Aug 23, 2011

    Kind of. :) I have a last-minute interview tomorrow for an LTS special education teacher position for kids in juvenile detention. Does anyone have any experiences with this type of job or population that you could share?

    I'm thinking that teaching juvy is probably a lot like teaching at-risk kids, except that these kids have moved beyond at-risk and there are guards outside the classroom and metal detectors...
     
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  3. Mrs_Garland

    Mrs_Garland Rookie

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    I just had an interview at an at risk school in my district and at that school they do pat them down as they enter the school every morning. The principal interviewing me seemed to want to stress the importance of classroom management and not letting the kids get away with ANYTHING

    She doesn't even approve of homework passes because she doesn't want them to be able to get away with not doing work.

    To be honest though, these kids could possibly be in juvy though. They have committed a level 4 behavior infraction (the worst of the worst).
     
  4. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    I worked in a similar situation. These students lived on site & were there more for emotional issues as opposed to crimes. I had a classroom with students 13-18 years old. There was a staff member from their unit in there at all times. I loved my class. They overall were sweet kids that were damaged emotionally. However, there were serious safety concerns with other students. The issue was actually the staff not doing their job to monitor students. I always felt safe in my classroom b-c the staff that worked with me were amazing! I worked there 6 months. It was difficult to leave b-c I was quite attached to my kids. I still have the goodbye card they made me...and that was in 1998. It can be a great experience...as long as your safety is not compromised.
     
  5. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I subbed for kids in an alternative high school and at juvie. I actually liked juvie better because I felt safer knowing that guards were right there, there were video cameras, and if they kids acted up, they would be kicked out and had to stay in their cell for the rest of the day (in my watch that never happened).

    But, at the alternative high school, I felt nervous and not as confident. The kids left whenever they wanted, cussed, etc. And it just wasn't me, they did this all the time with their regular teachers. So, of course, me, little ole' sub, couldn't keep them in order if their regular teacher couldn't.

    Anyways, I would really research the school and see if it's a good fit for you and something that you can handle.
     
  6. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

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    This school is actually at the juvenile detention center. I have heard from other people who have worked there that there are no behavior issues due to the guards and the whole cell issue that cmw mentioned. However, kids come in and out of the center all the time, so that would be interesting to work with...
     
  7. Jlyn07

    Jlyn07 Comrade

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    Aug 23, 2011

    Good luck on your interview!

    I don't have any advice but I am interested in working in this type of environment so I'm eager to hear how your interview goes.
     
  8. 12Souza

    12Souza Rookie

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    Aug 24, 2011

    I had a friend that worked at juvenile hall where classes were held. He said the difference between the kids there and the kids in some of the kids in the schools here are that the kids in juve got caught. Mostly repeat offenders with narcotics really.
     
  9. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Well, if there are guards & they say there's no real behavioral problems, give it a try if you want! Otherwise, if I wasn't told that, I'd have to give it some serious thought & probably lean towards not doing. I personally have kind of a low tolerance for kids who don't do as they're told & have no respect. That's why I prefer working in a small group setting as I've done w/ RSP & speech kids...much less of a chance of behavioral probelms.

    Good luck in whatever you decide!
     
  10. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    A lot of the teachers in my department worked in prison settings at one time or another. There is something so gratifying in being able to reach at-risk students. I have done so myself from the distance-learning side, but I would have probably jumped at the in-person juvenile prison position if one had opened during my search.
     
  11. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I haven't worked in a detention center, but I did work in the inner city. My biggest piece of advice is to make your content "real" to the kids. If you can get then to see why learning algebra or writing an essay actually pertains to their real life, you'll have a better chance of getting them to "buy in" to what you're teaching. Once they buy in, they'll be more likely to work for you.

    Another piece of advice is to treat them kindly. Now, I don't mean to be Mrs. Honey. Treat them as decent, worthwhile, human beings. Many of these kids get yelled at all the time. They're treated as if they don't have anything positive to contribute. I used to always tell my students that I held them in high esteem until they gave me a reason not to. Nothing anybody said about them meant anything until they proved to me that the others were right. Their goal for me was to prove all those others wrong. They responded quite well to that attitude.
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Aug 24, 2011

    Hear, hear!
     

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