positive discipline

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by MorahMe, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Messages:
    831
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 3, 2007

    This summer, I'll be working in a very proffesional day camp, as teacher for boys going into K. I'll have my own classroom, but we won't be there for most of the day. I'm looking for ideas for positive discipline that can basically travel through the building and yard with me. This is my idea: (please send your constructive critisism!)
    In my classroom, I'm going to have a bulletin board with a boy fishing, and a fish for each boy. Title: "Caught Being Good" When we return to "home base" after each activity, every boy who behaved appropriately (followed directions the first time, no fighting, stayed with the group) the whole time gets a stamp on his fish. After a specified number of stamps (not yet determined) boy gets a prize. (again, no ideas yet!!)
    What do you all think? Any ideas for number of stamps and what kind of reward I can give?
    Thanks! nmk
     
  2.  
  3. Myname

    Myname Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2006
    Messages:
    321
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 3, 2007

    I would say if all get a stamp then the end of the week they all get an ice cream party once they are back at "home base".
     
  4. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Messages:
    831
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 17, 2007

    Hi! Sorry it's taken me so long to respond-I haven't been near a computer for a while! I can't do an ice cream party, because according to what I've been told, there's no place in the schedule for such a thing-the whole day is planned out. The only time I have in the day that I can do as I please with my group is the first hour, and I can't start the day with ice cream! I'll probably do a "treasure chest," and they'll get to choose a prize according to the number of stamps they got in that week.
     
  5. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jun 17, 2007

    postive reinforcement

    Being outdoors presents whole new set of rules to content with. No running kinda gets tossed out the window..oops, no windows:p

    Seriously, I think you are on the right track. I believe in positive reinforcement, but eventually removing the reward. That way, kids do well for the sake of just doing what is expected. I've seen monsters appear when teachers promised treats, and the store was out of popsicles! :eek:

    So I would start off with tiny trinkets, and maybe have a treasure chest on Friday, with dollar store goodies or even donated McDonald's toys. See if you can build leadership by having kids show you and others what to do. IMO, that means so much more than a prize.

    In otherwords, praise, promise, and present. But praise is the best of all.
     
  6. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Messages:
    831
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 17, 2007

    Thanks for the input! I think I'm going to stick to treats/prizes that I can have on hand in advance, so if I don't have it, I don't promise it! That kind of takes care of the "store being out!" Are my 3 rules good, or am I leaving out something important? I haven't worked with boys in a while, and when I did, they were younger...
     
  7. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jun 17, 2007

    listening vs talking

    Sounds good 2 me. Might want to add, listen while others are talking. Give me five.. Eyes up front, mouth closed, ears listening, body still, hands to yourself. I know there is a catchy song, but can't think of it now.

    Even though its camp, you still want them to respect you as adult, and others when speaking. It could be as simple as

    "Waiting your turn to talk."
     
  8. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Messages:
    831
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 24, 2007

    Thanks! I'm actually heading now to make my BB's and a sign about bunk rules. We have our meetings on Tuesday and first day with the kids on Thursday! Wish me luck-I just found out that a former student's brother may be my camper, and I KNOW he's a difficult kid. I think I'll put the "No Fighting" rule in bold...
     
  9. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jun 24, 2007

    rephrase your words, and you will rephrase your thoughts.. ;)

    not difficult...challenging

    not pain in the butt..... but a purpose for (you add your word here)

    keep us posted!
     
  10. Miss Steele

    Miss Steele Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2007

    Something that our preschool psychologist shared with us last year (I never had a chance to try it out) was an idea for bracelets. She suggested making them out of colored masking tape (folding it over so that there's no sticky side but leaving a little extra on one end to attach the bracelet). The children wear the bracelets and you use small stickers to reinforce positive behavior. That way the reinforcement is immediate (you don't have to wait until you get back to the room) and the bracelet itself is a reward to take home at the end of the day. Also, by looking at the bracelets you can be reminded of who hasn't been praised enough and you can look for more things to praise them for.

    When introduced, this idea was to be used to reinforce one particular behavior, but it may work for you being that you're outside all day.

    Another thing you may want to try instead -- Don't worry about rewards and incentives! The kids don't expect it. Praise is (usually) enough for them. If you start out with nothing, for maybe a couple of weeks, and then it seems like they need something else to motivate them then start an incentive program. But I bet if you give YOUR ATTENTION as a reward, they won't need stickers or stamps or toys or anything!
     
  11. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jun 25, 2007

    Hey MissSteele,

    That sounds a whole lot better than the traditional stop light routine! "Flip your card, you are on yellow!" Oh, wow, you are already on Red.

    I mentioned treasure chest in my first post, only because campers expect a little more.

    I knew a teacher who cleared her behavior chart after lunch! that was a fresh approach!

    And back to the traffic light thing, and are we not already traumatizing them enough saying red means being bad? I hate red marks on my paper! Even if it's an "A"...it's red!
     
  12. Miss Steele

    Miss Steele Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2007

    Red is an equal color in my room!

    The only time red means something is when we're reading the green hand on the left means go from that side and when you get to the red hand on the right you stop.
     
  13. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jun 25, 2007

    wow, sounds like Scholastic' Language For Learning...very structured pre-k reading program. Uses pointer, and teacher script.

    but see, red still means stop! I think on the behavior chart, it's a little late to flip a card and say stop! They should have stopped on yellow, or stayed in the green and not started at all!
     
  14. Miss Steele

    Miss Steele Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 25, 2007

    I do not even know what Scholasic Language for Learning is!

    It's too much work for me to have any sort of behavior chart like that in my classroom. It doesn't seem like it would be very effective, either.
     
  15. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jun 25, 2007

    it is the Language Arts curriculum from h.e. double toothpicks.

    Fortunately, I was an sp. ed aide when the school threw it at my teacher, so I wasn't forced to like it.

    this is why I teach preschool...I run away from structured programs that don't give preschoolers time to grow, play and explore. "This, is a dog" sounds too much like "Fun with D*** and Jane" Plenty of time for reading. Threes fours and fives need recreation!
     
  16. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 26, 2007

    Okay I am in the same boat as you! I have a bunk of 4 year old girls this summer. They are truly "spitfires". All I hear to everything is the question "why?" I answer it and then they say "why?"

    For all of you preschool teachers...is this common in this age?

    Thanks!
     
  17. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2006
    Messages:
    3,565
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 26, 2007

    Mother of five year old twin girls here: yes, that is normal, especially for four year olds. "Why?" "Why?" "Why?"

    I have tried to look beyond the obvious "Why" answers and guess what they really want to know. For example. DD says "What time does that clock say?" "It says 4:15." "Oh. Why does it?" This means, tell me more about telling time.

    Example two. Me: "The cat is hungry. Please give him a scoop of food." DD: "Oh, ok. Why?" Since I already said the cat is hungry, I try to guess. Maybe she means Why is it my job to feed the cat? Or why do cats eat only one scoop? All lead different places, but so far I have not been left on the wrong path for long. "No, mom, I mean why do we care if the cat is hungry?"

    Good luck.
     
  18. dcnuck

    dcnuck Companion

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2005
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 26, 2007

    You are right TeacherShelly. When my prek or my own kids ask why I try to turn it into a question of my own. I think they want help thinking it thru and if you give them back a question of your own---it helps them get through the process of thinking it thru on their own and it helps to make sense to them. I probably just confused you but do you get my gist?
     
  19. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jun 27, 2007

    clz,

    why..(LOL) do you ask! :0
     
  20. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jun 27, 2007

    seriously they are leaving egocentrism..and exploring outside their world. everything has a reason, and they will forget..like my dad..with alzhiemers...but it is just so fascinating to hear this stuff there must be more..see...I am supposted (LOL) supposed to to be studying and I want to hear more!!!

    some secretly are waiting to see if you change the answer

    it's the same theory as the toddler who drops the spoon, while you keep picking it up
     
  21. MorahMe

    MorahMe Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Messages:
    831
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 22, 2007

    OK everyone, here's my update...sorry I haven't been around for a few weeks-things have been a little busy!
    I didn't get that challenging boy, (point taken!) but I did get plenty of others! The first two days of camp, I didn't mention the incentive charts at all. I just praised to the high heavens, and repeated my rules about a million times. After the first weekend I told them about it, and very slowly started giving out stamps. I haven't made a very big deal about it, and only use it as extra encouragement when they're being really impossible, like when I announced for the fiftieth time in two minutes that it's time to clean up with very little response (using varied methods, such as shutting the lights, asking them to freeze-which they do, but sometimes, my voice seems to cue them to go right back to what they were doing- and listen, singing, getting down on their level and showing them, and about a dozen others that I can't think of off the top of my head!) As soon as I take out my fish stamp and say "Judah is getting a stamp for cleaning up quickly!" most of them jump up and get going. I also use it in the opposite direction, like when we had an emergency on a trip, and all the campers followed directions (loaded the bus, sat in their seats, and basically let the RTE take care of the problem without interferance, which is more than you can say for some of the staff!), they all got stamps after the trip.

    This week, I got to send home 11 fish out of 19, and the other 8 are pretty close. I wrote "Look what _____ did! He filled his fish by getting "caught being good!" and then signed my name, as well as the 3 assistants. The director gave me cute key chains with a tic-tac-toe game on it, and the boys were all excited!

    The other thing I do, partially as an incentive, partially to keep communication open between myself and the parents, is write little notes to the parents, which I attach to the newsletters. Nothing major, just a small kindness a boy did, on a little post it. I hang them on a bulletin board and send them home at the end of the week.

    All in all, I haven't had any really major discipline problems. The Monday after our emergency, the director walked in on one of my campers trying/pretending to (I'm not sure which, but probably pretending) strangle another boy, and both boys really got it-but other than that, things are going quite well-especially when you consider that Thursday is the begining of second half already! Thanks for your help everyone!
     
  22. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    6,291
    Likes Received:
    278

    Jul 22, 2007

    sounds good. glad it is working out for you!
     
  23. mo2wb

    mo2wb Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 24, 2007

    I also struggle with discipline. I will recommend "Teaching With Love and Logic". It's important to me to build a loving but firm bond with my kids, simple transitions from one activity to the next, a lot of up and down time, praise and when problems do come, use those moments to work on problem solving skills. I work hard to model, model, the behavior I want to see in my kids and last but not least..I have a frog. *smile* not a real one! I have 20 large lily (laminated paper) pads that run across the bottom part of my wall each with velcro. When I see one of my children working or playing in a positive way I tell them they get a "hop". Which means they move the frog (also made out of paper and laminated) to the next lily pad, on friday if our frog has made it to the last lily pad we get to have a fun friday. We still learn (without them knowing it, at least) and we have so much fun. We eat special treats and play fun games. You should see how hard they work to make that frog hop throughout the week. If there is a discipline issue...we could loose a hop...BUT..if we work through our problems in the right way we might actually earn one instead. -Tonya
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Aidan Conolly,
  2. ashleyhenry,
  3. huzaifa
Total: 420 (members: 3, guests: 398, robots: 19)
test