Positive Behavior System

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by Grade1tchr, Aug 4, 2006.

  1. Grade1tchr

    Grade1tchr New Member

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    Aug 4, 2006

    Our school is implementing a "Positive Behavior System" this year. It totally focuses on the concept of catching kids doing something right and ignoring/redirecting unacceptable behaviors. We're all new to this and not sure how it's going to work. We have taken down our 'behavior charts' and our list of 'consequences' and posted "Rewards" and "Ticket keepers" ( to keep tickets they earn when caught being good.)
    Does anyone have experience with this system in your school and if so, what was it like? Any suggestions on non-tangible motivators?
     
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  3. kinderteach3

    kinderteach3 Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2006

    Hi there,
    I'm new to this as well, but I can tell you what I plan to do with it this year. (Last year I used the pull-card system and my principal pointed out it only focused on negative behavior, thus my changing to a positive plan this year). I am planning to discuss thoroughly with the kids my expectations and model proper behavior. Each student will have a sticker chart and when they are "caught" being good they will earn a sticker. At first it will be a small number of stickers (about 10) then when they earn that many stickers they get to pick a prize... not a prize box prize though. I've come up with some other "reward" coupons that they can cash in. For example: "Help Miss M. feed Skeeter" (class fish), "Sit with Miss M at snack" "Take care of Misty for the day" (stuffed unicorn that will sit with them), "Bring in a book to share with the class" "Bring in a show and tell for the class", etc. (Keep in mind I teach K, so these are things they get VERY excited about). As the year progresses it will probably become more difficult to earn stickers and probably will need more (15-20). Hope this helps... if you have any feed back, questions, or other ideas!!! please share!
     
  4. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    Aug 9, 2006

    Make sure that you are looking at the entirety of what you do in and out of the classroom...your relationships with students and how you develop them, the structure of your lessons, the relevancy of instruction...your own behavior. Behavior management (I think especially when making so radical a change) is mainly about your own behavior as a teacher. Thinking about this plan as a response to problem behavior...or a tool to prevent problems will limit you. Teachers who are good at managing behaviors are good teachers first(students are engaged, interested and the material is meaningful), they have quality relationships with students (understand their interests and frustrations and help them with both, show students that they are valued and that the time spent in the class is valuable) and are clear and consistent. Start the process BEFORE the students get in your class on day one by greeting them in the hallway or even earlier. Talk to them about your expectations. Get their input. Be clear and consistent.

    Your behavior is really the only behavior that you have direct control over. I can't emphasize enough how important your actions will be.

    All the best.
     
  5. Julie

    Julie Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2006

    our school uses PBS. we started it last year. basically we have the 3 B's - be respectful, be responsible and be safe. We have posters posted through out the building of proper behavior for each of these categories. For example, by the bathroom we have a poster of how to be respectful in the bathroom, how to be responsible and how to be safe. We have these in the lunch room, hallway, car pool area, bus area, etc. If a class or student is caught following these rules then the class earnes a fish for your classes fish bowl. (We are not allowed to give them to our own class). Teachers are given 5 at the beginning of the week to pass out. Once the bowl is full the class gets to choose a treat that we as a staff have come up with. The good part, teachers also get a reward for their hard work. Then you start over. The drawback, it got old by second semester and kids were getting fish just because teachers (me too) would forget to pass them out and now had a stock pile on their desk. Teachers are allowed to use what ever behavior system in their own classroom. Last year was a trial year, this year I am going to be more "positive" in my room to follow the 3 B's.
     
  6. lindalou

    lindalou Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2006

    We are also starting our second year of PBS. Our school looks like a prison b/c we have stripes down the hall (everyone is supposed to walk on the right side of the hall.) That made zero difference in behavior as far as I could see, but... moving on!

    Those stupid tickets! We keep a punch card for each child and teachers have positive notes to bestow on well-behaved children. Of course, I never remember to give any out outside of my class. I had one little girl who got one from the nurse every time she went b/c she remembered to ask for one....I had the most polite little boy you ever saw who learned to expect a reward every time he said please or thank you... You can imagine how easily this could turn into a popularity thing and how important giving this some real thought and planning is so you can be very consistent with it. My biggest gripe was with my personal child who was in fifth. She is a model student (I can say that b/c not all of my children are!LOL) and we all wish we had a roomful of her. There was a party celebrating/rewarding the students who received their first 20 punches (on their tickets) and my girl didn't get to go! There were several other "good" students who didnt get to go. I think they weren't paying attention to the "normal" students and were focusing on the "behaviors" and those ornery guys got rewarded! Also, some of the students were very forward about asking for punches so some kids had like 80 punches before some had even 20. It just got all bass-ackward b/c it was not thought thru beforehand. It got so bad by Thanksgiving some of us parents were considering going to the principal and "removing" our children from participating in the PBS program because it was making them feel bad! Of course, our kids didn't want to be singled out like that...

    Sorry for this long post but give this some thought before you start your punch program. I think it's like any other program and it can work if it is done right!
     
  7. Cyndi23

    Cyndi23 Companion

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    Aug 9, 2006

    I have one in my classroom. It's also for catching "good behaviors" (using please and thank you, helping others, etc) My kids are in 7th grade and REALLY respond to it. I have a big sparkly red toy box (3 feet by 1 foot maybe) filled w/ toys, school supplies, and homework passes). I call it Baldwin's bonus bin. The kids LOVE it and it really seems to help! They know they can't ask, but need to be "caught".
     

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