Positive Behavior Reinforcement System

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by ladytron, Jan 15, 2010.

  1. ladytron

    ladytron Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 15, 2010

    I learned this from my center's director and it seems to work like a charm in my classroom of 4 year olds...

    The system goes like this... each child has a bucket with their name on it, and inside the bucket they have a "positive behavior" punch card.

    Each time a child is using positive behavior (i.e. using first time obedience, helping another child, or "filling someone's bucket" by saying or doing something nice) they get a card that says "Caught You Being Good!" and it goes inside their bucket. For every "good" card they have in their bucket, they get a punch on their punch card. When the punch card is filled up, they choose a prize from the "treasure box."

    It can also be used as a disciplinary tool, by taking cards out of their bucket when a child is disobedient.

    I love this system and the kids seem to like it too!
     
  2.  
  3. elliemay

    elliemay Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 23, 2010

    I love this idea! I have had problems all year with my students and their listening skills. I am definitely going to try this!
    Thanks for sharing!
     
  4. Maxadoodle

    Maxadoodle Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    445
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 23, 2010

    I don't think kids need rewards for doing what they should be doing (and what most kids intrinsically want to do). I also don't believe in taking away for bad behavior. They are in preschool to learn good school behavior, how to be a good friend to others, and how to take care of their world (their classroom).
     
  5. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,591
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 23, 2010

    I agree with Max, it seems a bit overboard, and harsh. PS need to have freedom to experiment with behaviours. I strongly believe that children and people should not have to be rewarded for doing what is right. Being good is it's own reward.

    Now, if you are having some issues with a child, this might be a good technique to re-train a child.
     
  6. ladytron

    ladytron Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 23, 2010

    If they are not to be rewarded for being good, then how are they supposed to learn? Is it supposed to happen like magic? I definitely don't think that rewarding a child for good behavior is wrong, and I definitely don't think taking a card away is a harsh punishment either. If you think so, explain your reasons why you think this is harsh and your alternative to redirecting bad behavior? Like I said in my first post, this really works in my classroom and I see no need to change it, so enlighten me.
     
  7. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,591
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 23, 2010

    I am expressing my opinion, and how I teach. I reward good behavior by allowing the children to make choices, continue playing, and with verbal praise. Being good should be a habit and routine. In your system, good behavior is rewarded, thus, if a child is in an environment that does not give concrete reward for good behavior, how will the child know wheather he is being good or not? Good behavior needs to become an intrinsic value.

    If a child earns something, he should get to keep it. Does your employer take away part of your paycheck if you fail to teach?

    I guess I find gentler techniques to be more in line with my philosophy.

    A child of PS age is still learning what is good and bad. Giving them a safe environment to explore is what allows them to learn to make good decisions. Remember, a child has to repeat a behavior, concept, song, fingerplay, etc. many times before he learns it.

    I am a great believer in Piaget. Thus, many of my techniques relfect his approach.

    Remember, these are my opinions. Families choose PS based upon what they want for their child. Your families are coming to you based upon their perception of your style. That is why there are many types of programs. I do not think you are wrong in your appoach, as long as you have defined a philosophy that supports your approach.

    If this is working, and the children seem happy, then go for it. I am not wanting to argue with you, but just want to express a point of view.
     
  8. Maxadoodle

    Maxadoodle Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    445
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 24, 2010

    I agree with all Blue said, and also am simply stating my opinions. I also disagree with parents giving money for good grades or schools giving rewards (like Great America trips) for reading, or giving/taking away allowance based on chores. Each child should want to earn good grades, want to read, and should be expected to do chores as a member of the family. I do understand that not everyone will agree with me, but in both my family and my classroom my philosophy has worked.
     
  9. Glenda

    Glenda Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 24, 2010

    Thanks Ladytron, cute idea!

    My only warning would be not to "over do" the taking out. My son's first grade teacher had a class marble jar that when filled was suppose to earn the class a treat, like popsicles. But she was such a nasty old bat that she made sure they never filled it up. They'd get close to the top and she'd start plucking them out for minor infractions. :eek: My daughter's teacher had the same system, but RARELY took their already earned marbles out. They earned tons of special days, like pj day, toy day, gum day (sugarfree).
    To me, taking marbles (or punches away) would be like your boss saying, this week you've not done so well, so please bring back some of last weeks paycheck! :eek:hmy:
     
  10. punchinello

    punchinello Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Messages:
    367
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 24, 2010

    If a "system" is used, I prefer rewarding the whole group. Filling a jar or drawing smilie faces can be kept light and fun. I would never take away anything.
    Individual rewards aren't helpful at this age. A simple "Joey is ready to listen" will work every time. If they only hear their names in association with good behavior, they will keep on doing the right thing.
     
  11. vbubbles1874

    vbubbles1874 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 24, 2010

    I have a class of 19 boys and 7 girls; some of my boys are the most difficult in the entire building. I have 1 whose parents have divorced and it has affected him seriously...he throws toys, hits, kicks and calls names when he gets angry. I have another little boy who throws himself on the floor like a 2 year old when I ask him to do the simplest tasks, I have another little boy who will not keep his hands to himself. He feels the need to constantly touch his friends. These are but just a few of the behavioral issues I have in my classroom. I have tried everything and will take any suggestions.

    I am not fond of rewarding positive behaviors, but I am to the point that I will try anything. I agree that positive behavior should be reward in its self, but let's face facts. We live in a world where that just doesn't work.
     
  12. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,591
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jan 24, 2010

    V, when issues like your arise, it is time to bring out the big guns. Using such a strong system can be used to teach habits, and when the habit is established, back down until the habit becomes intrinsic.
     
  13. msj

    msj Companion

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 26, 2010

    This is how I feel. I had a class last year that was beginning to get out of control so I hit the internet for some ideas. I found power teaching. I used it for about a month until my class was back on track and then phased it out.
     
  14. elliemay

    elliemay Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 27, 2010

    I, too, have had a very hard time this year with listening skills in my classroom. The children will continue to talk over me or my asst. It doesn't matter if I flick the lights, ask them to go to the thinking chair to reevaluate their behavior, etc.

    I think that this system of using a reward might be the only way to get this in tact. I usually do not use a reward system but I feel that you should be flexible or open to new ideas or thoughts when what you have been doing in the past will not work for the present.

    Just my 2 cents. :)
     
  15. jlj

    jlj Devotee

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,156
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 29, 2010

    msj- what is power teaching? Where can I get info? Did it really work long term? i haven't used a reward system in years but this year I've tried everything that worked when I did use them plus ideas from atoz & anywhere else I can pull from. Nothing works! I have taught close to 30 years & NEVER had a class like this!! This year for the first time I have a PK/Kinder combo class 8:30-12:00 then Kinder (being full time) continues the remainder of the school day. They are together in the am for calendar time, themes, centers, snack, and recess and Kinder is out of the room part of the am for specials which is when I do "lessons/skills" with PK, (Kinder's in the afternoon). During centers there's some activities for all & some PK and/or K specific. The problems aren't even more one age group over another. They tattle over everything, argue, pout, have tantrums, talk truly non-stop (never quitely for more than a few minutes, it's always at more than full volume), they interrupt no matter who's talking or what we're doing. Centers time usually gets cut short due to noise level, misuse of centers, etc.They will not stay in their seats even during snack, Kinder won't stop talking even during tests, even when told their paper will be taken which will mean a sad face and note home, nothing seems to phase them! It doesn't matter how much I praise those doing as expected or correct those not doing as expected. All the specials teachers have the same problems with them & their PK teachers from last year had the same problems. :banghead: Oh, & most of these children unfortunately do seem to rule the roost in their homes. They are downright spoiled & the parents give in or bargain with them to get them to do what they ask of them, I've witnessed this on many occasions with all but 2 children out of 16! :dunno:Whatever happened to good old fashioned real parenting & respect?! :eek: sorry, a little venting.
    Anyway, I for another could also use some advice! Thanks for listening!! :blush:
     
  16. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2008
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 29, 2010

    Power Teaching is now called Whole Brain Teaching. It is VERY effective long term at pretty much any grade level, easy to use, and the kids love it.

    Go here for a walkthrough on how to get started, go here to talk to others who use the method, and get hundreds of pages of downloads, and games for free.
     
  17. msj

    msj Companion

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 30, 2010

    Power Teaching worked well in my class. You do need to adjust it a bit for the younger kids. I used the "Hands & Eyes" and the "Class-Yes" which I still use now. I also went over the rules of the class a lot with hand gestures and used the scoreboard with smiles and frowns. I stopped using the scoreboard after the children started following the rules better. I still go over the rules w/ gestures periodicly, but nothing like I was when I used the scoreboard.
     
  18. jlj

    jlj Devotee

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,156
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 30, 2010

    Thanks for the info I'll definitely check it out! :)
     
  19. vbubbles1874

    vbubbles1874 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 30, 2010

    I started a new positive behavior reinforcement system on Friday. I used decorative library pockets that I found at Mardel...I wrote everyone's name on a pocket and displayed them where they could be easily seen. Then I put a strip of paper in each pocket measuring 6in long x 3 inches wide. I have a star punch that I used for scrapbooking. When I see someone making good choices they get a star punch. When they reach 20 stars they get to choose something from the treasure box. I am hoping that this will help cut down on the discipline problems in my class.
     
  20. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jan 30, 2010

    I like this system, with the exception of taking card when a child is disobedient. If the child has earned it, then it shouldn't be taken away. Positive reinforcement systems work by rewarding good behavior, not by punishing "bad" behavior. Kids are more likely to
    repeat behaviors that are reinforced, either through praise, a token system (which is what you are using), or something tangible. I think this program is great. I would just rethink the idea of taking back something they already "earned." If you "must" use some sort of punishment, I would suggest giving them time out, or anything else that doesn't involve taking away something they have already earned.
     
  21. vbubbles1874

    vbubbles1874 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 30, 2010

    I don't take stars away! That was 1 thing I decided would be the best. Once a star is earned it cannot be taken away!
     
  22. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2003
    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jan 30, 2010

    V- I would suggest either giving a LOT of star punches when the program starts, or cutting down the number from 20 to 15, or maybe even 10, until the program is underway, and kids start getting rewards. You can't make the reward system too hard in the beginning, or else they won't even bother. But if they start getting the tangible rewards a little quicker when the program starts, then they will be more willing to work the program. THEN you can rearrange the program to either make the stars harder to receive, or raise the price of the "treasure" box accordingly. While these Positive behavior programs work wonderfully, it sometimes takes some trial and error before you find the right "rate" of rewards. Don't be afraid to change the rate if it appears too easy, or too hard.
     
  23. vbubbles1874

    vbubbles1874 Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2008
    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 31, 2010

    I thought about making it less stars, but I have 26 kids and a preschool teacher budget. I have several kids who will hit 20 stars right away and a few that wil have to fight for every one they get. I gave out quite a few the first day and you could see it start to make a difference. I will test the waters and see how far it gets me in redirecting the discipline issues
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Vinaya,
  2. VB2020
Total: 349 (members: 2, guests: 326, robots: 21)
test