Points or learning

Discussion in 'General Education' started by a2z, Jun 7, 2017.

  1. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Jun 11, 2017

    Can someone PM me about what standards based grading looks like? I get the concept, but I want someone to help me understand how I would do this in gradebook with weights, percentages, etc. Can I do this on my own or does it need to be a school-wide thing?
     
  2. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Jun 12, 2017

    I think one way to do it is to assign a certain range of grades to a level of mastery.

    Ex. 90-100 = level of mastery 4
    80-90= level of mastery 3
    and so on...

    So you could assign the level and then calculate grades with that. The range of grades may be hard for some schools however. In that case, you could have a Level 4=100%, Level 3=90% and so on. Since tests probably cover more than one standard, you could average the grades that correspond to each standard to get a grade for your gradebook.
     
  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jun 12, 2017

    What you suggest is typical grading in under a cloak of regular grading.
     
  4. Kat.

    Kat. Companion

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    Jun 12, 2017

    At my school, K-2 gets ratings in different competencies that look like this:

    1 - Below basic, working below grade level standard, needs strong instructional support
    2 - Basic, beginning to meet standard, many errors, frequently needs instructional support
    3 - Proficient, frequently meets standards, limited errors, occasionally needs frequent support, demonstrates proficiency
    4 - Advanced, consistently meets and often exceeds standards, rare to no errors, rarely needs teacher support to meet standard, independently works with ease and extends

    That's the rubric that is on the report card that goes home, so parents can understand the ratings. There's pros and cons to this - it's VERY vague and up to teacher interpretation. It's also hard (especially in first grade) for my students to get a 4 because when they're so young they do so often need my help. I've only been a teacher for a year, but the parents from my class last year didn't seem confused by any of the ratings...but I did have a parent who expected all 4's every time. It's kind of harder to justify the ratings to parents because I can't just say "here's what they got on these assignments, so their grade calculated to this."

    It also seems like there's a big jump between a 3 and a 4. I think the 3 should add "beginning to work independently" or something along those lines.

    I'm not a fan of the school being split. Once the kids are in third grade they begin getting real grades. I think it should be one way or the other the whole way through.
     
  5. Kat.

    Kat. Companion

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    Jun 12, 2017

    Oh, and that rating system is how it is in the computer for us...so for us it's a school wide thing. Each subject has a tonnnnn of competencies that we have to rate (it takes forever!)
     
  6. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Jun 12, 2017

    I tried changing my grading system to reflect growth and progress versus start high and slowly drop - it didn't work. Parents wanted their kids to have A's immediately. They weren't willing to wait to see them grow to that point. The district demands we update grades every 2 weeks. If my first update showed all "Not Yets" they would have flipped.

    I think we're moving in the right direction but we're not even there yet in educational circles - let alone the culture at large.

    On that note, standards based grading is the topic for tonights SSChat on Twitter at 7 PM Est at #sschat.
     
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  7. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Jun 12, 2017

    I'd have the same issue if I tried. Parents and students keep a constant eye on their grades online, and if anything isn't up to what they want, they start wanting to know how they can fix that grade. Can they do test corrections? Can they retest? Can they do extra credit? Can they bring in some boxes of Kleenex for extra points? (LOL). They don't care WHY the grade is low, they just care that it's low and want it to be higher by any means possible. Saying, "Well, you're just at the beginning of your learning journey and should hopefully improve over time," just isn't going to fly.

    We live in a world where people want things NOW. They aren't patient enough to "grow".
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jun 12, 2017

    Many parents were educated in the "we teach it and move on" educationsl setting.
     
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  9. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Jun 12, 2017

    Yeah, but some schools require you to give kids grades out of 100. So this is a way to implement standards based grading and still follow school policy.
     
  10. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Jun 13, 2017

    Yep, and so were many teachers (including me). I'm about the same age as most of my students' parents and actually went to school with many of them (at the high school where I now teach, no less). Our administrators are of that same era and mindset too.
    I recognized the benefit of the switch to a more growth-oriented mindset, but it isn't an easy switch when generations of parents and educators have always done it a different way. I spoke to a parent yesterday about her child's score on a state test (English test). She was worried about the low score and whether it would impact her child's ability to go to college. In the next breath, she admitted that the child didn't like reading, and that this was a trait handed down from the mother, who also didn't care for reading. The insinuation was that there really isn't much to be done to improve the child's reading level because, well, she just doesn't like to read. But the mother wanted an improved score on a reading test, and her only solution was to lay into the kid about the low score and tell her to do better.
    I tried to explain to the parent that the test was difficult and required them to have pretty good reading skills to score well.
    I think what happens is, the kids get good grades in the lower levels when things are easy, they're never challenged to keep improving and growing their skills as they climb through the grades, and then they arrive at whatever grade having always made high grades on less-challenging work, and suddenly they hit a wall and the parents think it's just the kid being lazy.
     
  11. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jun 13, 2017

    The reaction to hitting the wall isn't just what parents do. It is very common for reachers to draw the same conclusion, especially when the child got by on strengths rather than skills. It happens in reafing when kids lack critical skills but appear to have them because they use their memory or language skills until the material outpaces their bag of tricks. Sure loks like laxy. The lower their supplemental skills the earlier you see the wall.
     
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  12. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jun 13, 2017

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
  13. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jun 13, 2017

    Some kids read by sight snd can comprehend until the materials get too difficult. Some kids can write well until they must analyze or persuade. Or their lower level language skills are great but going beyond needs more than just exposure.
     

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