Pointers for passing Praxis 1 Math in GA

Discussion in 'Basic Skills Tests' started by bnewsome, Jul 12, 2006.

  1. PraxisMania

    PraxisMania Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2007

    agreed
     
  2. PraxisMania

    PraxisMania Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2007

    Monday will be my 6th time writing Praxis Math and if I don't get it this time I am licensing a gun and putting it to my head! I'm sick of it!
     
  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 6, 2007

    Which, I should have added, means that dumb stuff like 2495 instead of 2500 on a problem like this will not be your problem.
     
  4. PraxisMania

    PraxisMania Rookie

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    Sep 6, 2007

    Well I guess considering it's from a algebra book and not a praxis book it would make sense.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 8, 2007

    Are you perhaps feeling just a trifle less terrified now, I hope?
     
  6. PraxisMania

    PraxisMania Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2007

    I hope lol
    I did a praxis test like the real one today and got 180..175 is passing mark. I'm going to do another one tomorrow. I found there were a lot of profit or increase/decrease questions on it
     
  7. USCgrad

    USCgrad Companion

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    Sep 10, 2007

    where did you take practice tests?
     
  8. PraxisMania

    PraxisMania Rookie

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    Sep 10, 2007

    I took the practice tests at praxismath.com
     
  9. USCgrad

    USCgrad Companion

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    Sep 11, 2007

    oh...thnks!!
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 11, 2007

    As you work on practice questions, reserve a little slice of your attention for how you approach questions. Track what it is that you do and how you feel in dealing with problems that you're comfortable with, and then plunder that process for things you can transfer into the questions you're not so comfortable with.
     
  11. Aimee1020

    Aimee1020 Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2007

    I am getting ready to take my first shot at passing the praxis. The questions and answers everyone has posted have been the ones given me a hard time to.. I will be glad when the 27th gets here, so I can take it and see what happens..
     
  12. Aimee1020

    Aimee1020 Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2007

    If Steven can mix 20 drinks in 5 minutes, Sue can mix 20 drinks in 10 minutes, and Jack can mix 20 drinks in 15 minutes, how much time will it take all 3 of them working together to mix the 20 drinks?

    Answers are: 2.44minutes; 2.88 minutes, 3.10 minutes, 3.26 minutes, 4.15 minutes

    I had it as 5x+10x+15x = 60minutes
    30x = 60minutes
    That does not give the right answer.. Can someone tell me what I am doing wrong? I think I am confused on what to set it up equal to in this problem and the next one.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If Sam can do a job in 4 days that Lisa can do in 6 days and Tom can do in 2 days, how long would the job take if Sam, Lisa, and Tom worked together to complete it?

    Answers are: 0.8 days, 1.09 days, 1.23 days, 1.65 days, 1.97 days

    I had it as 4x+6x+2x = ?
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If two planes leave the same airport at 1:00pm, how many miles apart will they be at 3:00pm if one travels directly north at 150mph and the other travels directly west at 200mph?

    Answers are: 50 miles, 100 miles, 500 miles, 700 miles, 1,000 miles

    I have no idea how to answer this one. I thought it was distance = rate * time.. I had 200-150= (3-1)x.. When I solved it, I did not get the right answer.. Can someone help please? Thank you..
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 17, 2007

    Aimee1020, the first two of these are rate problems involving combined rates.

    The classic example of a rate formula is, of course, distance = rate * time, but we can generalize the formula like so:

    work = work * time
    work = time

    Please note that a rate is ultimately a fraction: "45 miles per hour" translates into 40 miles/1 hour, "20 drinks in 15 minutes" translates into 20 drinks/15 minutes, and so on. Crucially, whatever kind of thing goes to the left of the equals sign in the formula is in the numerator of the rate.

    To combine rates, you add them: rate = Steven's rate + Sue's rate + Jack's rate. Which means, yes, it's common-denominator time: 20 drinks/5min + 20 drinks/10 min + 20 drinks/15 min. It's less icky, of course, if we first reduce the second formula: Sue's 20 drinks/10 min = 10 drinks/5 min, which is the same denominator as Steven's 20 drinks/5 min, and the least common multiple of 5 and 15 is of course 15. And in this case "20 drinks" is the total output - the work - and we're solving for the total time.

    The job problem works exactly the same way, and the work is always 1 job, so for just Sam it looks like this:

    1 job = 1 job * days
    1 job = 4 days

    The third problem is sneakier. Your best bet may be to start by drawing a picture of where the planes will be and label each plane's path with how far it's gone at the end of the two hours (you can probably do the numbers in your head, and, yes, that part is the distance formula). But then you have to do something else. Draw and label the paths and then see if you can figure out what comes next.
     
  14. Aimee1020

    Aimee1020 Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2007

    Thanks for the help.. that makes sense now

     
  15. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 17, 2007

    You're welcome. One other hint to you: Label your units. That way, if the question asks for minutes and you find that all your "minutes" slots have numbers already in them - as happened in your version of the first question - you'll know you need to do something different.

    Oh, and reward yourself for working hard and asking for help.
     
  16. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 17, 2007

    Aimee, where did you find these?
     
  17. Aimee1020

    Aimee1020 Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2007

    on http://www.testprepreview.com/praxis_practice.htm

    it has practice test broken up into different subjects.. I will reward myself with tickets if i pass my test next weekend.. thanks again for the help


     
  18. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 17, 2007

    Huh. I rather like the third question, actually, since it neatly tests two different areas of mathematical knowledge, but it would be a bit astonishing to find more than one or two questions like the first two on any one version of Praxis I.
     
  19. Aimee1020

    Aimee1020 Rookie

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    Oct 17, 2007

    Well that is good to know.. Since I have not taken it i am scared that I am practicing the right formulas and problems to pass..

     
  20. Beth561

    Beth561 Comrade

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    Oct 26, 2007

    That was great---Now I get it.
     
  21. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 30, 2007

    You're welcome, and my pleasure.
     
  22. Here2Learn

    Here2Learn Companion

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    Nov 5, 2007

    i had to take the math portion of the praxis today. i have always struggled with math so i was worried about it. i had looked over this thread for the past few days to get an idea about the questions that would be on it. the questions on this thread are ten times harder than any questions that are on the test. all i studied are the sample questions that are on the website and i did fine. i wish i wouldn't have stressed out about it so much because it was really simple.
     
  23. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Nov 5, 2007

    Sounds promising, Here2Learn.
     
  24. Hope2Pass

    Hope2Pass New Member

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    Jun 6, 2008

    heelllppp

    Can someone please help me with this problem?

    12. The last week of a month a car dealership sold 12 cars. A new sales promotion came out the first week of the next month and the sold 19 cars that week. What was the percent increase in sales from the last week of the previous month compared to the first week of the next month?

    A. 58%
    B. 119%
    C. 158%
    D. 175%
    E. 200%


    thanks!
     
  25. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jun 7, 2008

    Percent increase or decrease is the percentage of change from the earlier point to the later. You calculate it almost the same way you calculate a regular ol' percentage, but not quite: the difference is... well, the difference, between the later number and the earlier one, which corresponds to the "is" number.

    A general formula for percentage change, if we let p stand for the prior value and s for the subsequent value, would be

    s - p
    . p


    (So sue me: I like my variables to reflect what I'm looking at.)

    Let's illustrate from your problem. Sales for the original week totaled 12 cars: that's our p value. Sales for the following week totaled 19 cars: that's our s value. Then we substitute:

    19-12 = 7/12 = 58%
    . 12
     
  26. bckilinn27

    bckilinn27 Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2008

    Hi everyone...I have been browsing this forum and it has helped me quite a bit - I am taking the Math Praxis I tomorrow morning. I did have a question though, there was a previous question :

    If two planes leave the same airport at 1:00pm, how many miles apart will they be at 3:00pm if one travels directly north at 150mph and the other travels directly west at 200mph?

    and I never saw the answer to it. I worked it out and I got 50 miles apart. I was just wondering if I was right.

    Thanks!
     
  27. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    bckilinn it sounds like you were right, because it ends up being a right triangle where you are finding the hypotenuse, so

    a^2+b^2=c^2
    (150+150)^2+(200+200)^2=c^2
    300^2+400^2=c^2
    900+1600=c^2
    2500=c^2 then take the square root of each and
    c=50
     
  28. bckilinn27

    bckilinn27 Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2008

    yes, that's the formula that I used - cool, thanks Jessica :)
     
  29. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 25, 2008

    Um.

    You're right that the problem describes a right triangle and that the Pythagorean theorem is involved. Very good.

    But if a = 150, then a^2 ("a squared") is simply 150 x 150; and if b is 200, then b^2 is simply 200 x 200; if we plug THOSE values into the equation, we then get

    150^2 + 200^2 = c^2
    22500 + 40000 = c^2
    62500 = c^2
    250 = c​

    (And, by the way, 300^2 isn't 900, it's 90000. Let me suggest that you try working this out by hand on your own.)

    There is, however, a simpler way. It's very common for there to be questions on basic-skills teacher tests that involve Pythagorean triples: that is, the three sides of the triangle will involve numbers are in the relationship 3:4:5 (or less often, one of the other Pythagorean triples). In this case (and I'm using boldface for the sake of exposition:

    Airplane A's path is 150 miles, or 3(50) miles
    Airplane B's path is 200 miles, or 4(50) miles

    The distance between the planes is the hypotenuse of the triangle, or 5(50) miles, otherwise known as 250 miles.
     
  30. bckilinn27

    bckilinn27 Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2008

    Also, I do have a hard time understanding questions like this one:

    If P/5 = Q, then P/10 =

    a). 10Q
    b). 2Q
    C). Q/2
    d). Q/10
    e). Q/20

    any advice?
     
  31. bckilinn27

    bckilinn27 Rookie

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    oh wow... guess I better rethink that one ty teachergroupie
     
  32. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    You're right TG, I got so into the 3:4:5 right triangle relationship that I ignored how many zeros I had and messed it up and I definitely like the other way you explained it (much easier!).
     
  33. bckilinn27

    bckilinn27 Rookie

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    TG, is this always true with pythagorean theorem - 3:4:5? Because that is so much easier to figure - plus would save time on praxis since we only have 60 minutes.

    Jessica - we both added instead of squared a and b!

    One of my problems is that I go too fast - I really need to slow down and make sure I am doing the problems correctly here.
     
  34. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    No, it's not always true, but when it is, yes, it's a nifty timesaver. And Pythagorean triples based on the 3:4:5 relation are very common on non-math teacher tests. The next most common Pythagorean triples are based on the relation 5:12:13, but they're a lot less common.

    Did you know that builders and surveyors use the 3:4:5 relation to make sure the corners of a building or path are square? They have a circle of rope or chain that's 3+4+5 feet long, marked into lengths of 3 feet, 4 feet, and 5 feet; when the lengths line up with stakes that are exactly 3 feet and 4 feet from the stake at the corner, you're guaranteed that the lines that those stakes are on form a 90-degree angle.

    Please imagine, bckilinn27, that you're not TAKING the test, but you're TEACHING the test to someone who has issues remarkably like yours. What would you do to help bail out that poor soul?
     
  35. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    Actually TG shouldn't it be 500 miles apart since both planes will be in the air for two hours?
     
  36. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 25, 2008

    There are lots of ways to approach this one.

    You could start by setting it up as a proportion, given that, for any number Q, Q = Q/1:

    P = Q
    5 = 1

    The problem tells us that we want P/10. Now what do we have to do to P/5 to get it there? Multiply 5 by 2, that's what - but since we're changing the denominator of one fraction, we have to do exactly the same thing to the other, right? Which gets us to

    P = = Q
    5*2 = 1*2

    And that amounts to Q/2.
     
  37. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 25, 2008

    (Blush. Blush, blush, blush.)

    Yup.
     
  38. bckilinn27

    bckilinn27 Rookie

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    Thanks TG, that is the best explaination i've seen for that type of problem!

    I have been studying for more than 1wk - about 1-2 hrs daily - hopefully i'll be fine tomorrow!
     
  39. bckilinn27

    bckilinn27 Rookie

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    and thanks for pointing that out Jessica... it reminds me that I MUST pay attention to detail because I am sure 250 would be one of the answers!
     
  40. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    bckilinn, it sounds like you should be well-prepared. Good luck with your test tomorrow!
     

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