Please tell me if this rubric is at the top tier of Bloom's taxonomy.

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by justdot, Mar 27, 2012.

  1. justdot

    justdot Rookie

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    Mar 27, 2012

    Hi all,

    I've completed my student teaching in English. I am now focusing on my PACT assessment. For those of you who didn't have to take a PACT assessment, it means I had to film myself, come up with a teaching philosophy and assess individual students based on their work performance. But, I'm pretty sure every state has their own version of a PACT assessment during the credential program.

    Anyways, for my assessment, I'm focusing on the week or so that I spent teaching students how to write an AP English style essay in class (timed at 50 minutes). Originally, I graded their essays based on the 9-point rubric found on the college board's website that is used to grade all AP English essays.

    However, I felt that that rubric was too vague and my assessor's may look down on me using that rubric to grade the essays. So, I made my own.

    But, I have no idea if it's good enough. Is it easy to read (it's actually formatted in the typical rubric style box)? Would tenth graders understand it? More importantly, does it focus on the analysis and creation of the essay, rather than just grammar and syntax. The PACT grades heavily on student teachers providing students with assessments that allow them to "create" and "analyze," rather than just regurgitate information.

    Introduction:
    A (100-90)
    Introduction paragraph contains a catching hook for the reader, addresses the text being argued and has a well-developed thesis. The introduction will also address the prompt.

    B (89-80)
    Introduction paragraph contains a hook for the reader, addresses the text being argued and has a developed thesis. The introduction addresses the prompt.

    C (79-70)
    Introduction contains a weak hook for the reader. The thesis is existent, but hard to prove or not very thoughtful. The prompt is addressed in the intro to alert the reader.

    D (69-60)
    Introduction contains no hook. The thesis is undeveloped. Text is superficially addressed. The essay prompt is not addressed.

    F (59 and below)
    Introduction contains no hook. There is no thesis. Text and thesis prompts are not addressed.

    Body paragraph:

    A (100-90)
    There are at least three body paragraphs. Each body paragraph has minimum five well-written sentences. There is a topic sentence for each paragraph.

    B (89-80)
    There are at least three body paragraphs. Each body paragraph contains minimum five sentences. Most of the sentences are well-written.

    C (79-70)
    There are less than three body paragraphs, but they are still the minimum of five sentences. The sentence style may be repeated, but with some variety.

    D (69-60)
    There are less than three paragraphs and they do not meet the minimum of five sentences. Sentence style may be repeated.

    F (59 and below)
    There may be only one or two body paragraphs and these paragraphs fall short of the acceptable minimum amount of sentences. Sentence style is repetitive.


    Analysis of prompt:

    A (100-90)
    Thoroughly addresses the entire aspect of the prompt; essay is well-developed and has a sound and logical organization; Essay uses strong evidence from the text being analyzed.

    B (89-80)
    Analysis is thorough, but may be superficial or “surface-level” at times. Essay contains strong evidence from the text being analyzed, thus showing that the reader understands the text and the prompt.

    C (79-70)
    Analysis is more superficial than thorough. Essay may read as summary in some areas. Essay has a “weak” understanding of the prompt and / or the text.

    D (69-60)
    The student summarizes the prompt’s ideas and the text instead of analyzing them. There is very little, if any, in-depth thought. Essay has very weak understanding of the text and the prompt being analyzed.

    F (59 and below)
    Essay demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text being analyzed. The essay also demonstrates a minimal understanding of the prompt. There is very little correct “evidence” from the text to support the writer’s ideas and may read as generalizations.


    Syntax:

    A (100-90)
    Essay is well-written and sophisticated. There are only two or three syntax errors and only a couple of spelling errors (as can be expected in a timed essay).

    B (89-80)
    The essay is generally well-written with only some minor syntax and spelling errors.

    C (79-70)
    Essay is written with some more major grammar and spelling errors. However, the essay is still understandable.

    D (69-60)
    Essay is understandable, but the control of writing causes the flow of the essay to be off. There are also too many syntax and spelling errors, causing difficulty for the reader to understand the essay.

    F (59 and below)
    Use of words / grammar control is fundamental, at best. There are numerous mistakes in the essay that take away from the overall concept of the essay.



    Thank you for taking a look at this and providing your feedback.
     
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  3. MissMatty

    MissMatty Rookie

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    Mar 28, 2012

    That looks great to me. Easy to read (almost like a checklist for the kids). Nice focus on structure and analysis, because good essays must have both, arguably.

    I teach my schools 'top' (aussie school, not sure how it translates) year ten, and I use almost the same rubric.
     
  4. SciTeach8

    SciTeach8 Rookie

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    Mar 29, 2012

    Just curious, you are done with student teaching? I am working on PACT as well, but we have student teach the entire semester, even while working on PACT.
     
  5. justdot

    justdot Rookie

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    Mar 30, 2012

    yes, i'm done. I already took the pact but I failed (womp womp). So, I'm taking it again. I kinda feel like the pact AND student teaching are way too much to do in one semester. But, I might have a bias.
     
  6. justdot

    justdot Rookie

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    Mar 30, 2012


    thank you!
     
  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Mar 30, 2012

    The one thing you might want to consider is using higher end verbs, such as appraise, construct, and create. Bloom's is all about guiding verbs.
     
  8. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Mar 30, 2012

    I don't like the body paragraph section. Something like # of sentences is not at the higher end of Blooms. I think what you are assessing is probably topic development. This is from the rubric my old school used that was modeled from the state rubric:

    4. The topic is carefully developed and maintained because of the many relevant details.
    3. The writer provides some insight or depth of understanding to the topic. He/she is mainly on topic, but more development of details is needed.
    2. The development of the topic shows little insight or understanding of the topic. Mainly surface details are provided. The writer may or may not stray from the topic.
    1. The writer communicates no real understanding of the topic and appears to have given little thought to selecting details that would enhance the development.

    I think the rest of it looks ok. But honestly, for writing, I always use the state rubric from the writing part of the state test. I am sure you can find your state's on the DOE site.
     

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