Please I really need help..bad situation

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by mrsfroggey, Aug 25, 2007.

  1. mrsfroggey

    mrsfroggey Rookie

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    Aug 25, 2007

    I posted this on the behavior mgmt but got no response please any and all help will be appreciated.

    I have a first grade student that transfered from a private school, who's behavior problems have gone into a dangerous situation, daily since school began on Monday. He has impulse issues, ADHD and possible asphergers(sp?) He has done everything from running around the room, throwing his bag and lunchbox at me, throwing tennis balls/chairs/and desk at the class/students/and me. Jumping on and off tables with my long ruler poking ceiling tiles. He has gone up on referrals, been sent home, today was restrained and my class evacuating into another area for our protection. I have tried to discuss it, be stern, ignore the behavior, reward the good things, time out, time off of recess, and nothing works. The parents are very supportive, and are trying to take him to the doctor for more diagnosis. The school is very supportive and comes immediately when I call for help. But I could really use some suggestions in the mean time while. Thanks for any and all help
     
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  3. funkychickenchi

    funkychickenchi Rookie

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    Aug 25, 2007

    How long has he been in your class? You listed several things that you tried, but in my opinion they should be tried consistantly for at least a couple of weeks before trying something else. It can be hard, but it could take him that long to figure out how he needs to behave to earn something. Has a functional behavioral analysis been done to determine what is causing the behavior or do you already know?

    Also you put rewarding the good things-how was this done. Randomly or was it set up as a token board system?
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 25, 2007

    Document, document, document. I doubt anything will do too much good unless this little guy gets the medical treatment he needs.
     
  5. autumnpumpkin

    autumnpumpkin Rookie

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    Aug 25, 2007

    Yikes! I had a behavior student last year who sounds alot of like your little guy except not as extreme. Anyway, these are a few of the techniques that the occupational therapist recommended...
    1. He had problems sitting still so he wore a weighted vest for five minutes every hour or a weighted blanket on his legs when seated.
    2. He liked to bite and kick myself and the other students so we gave him a chew toy(they really do have these things out there for students like this) and also we gave him a fidget toy (such as a stress ball). There were rules that went with these toys. The occupational therapist also recommended I give him a pillow that he is allowed to punch when he gets angry (to let out his frustrations) to keep him from hitting other kids (I didn't do this because I disagreed with this technique but others teachers think it would have been a good idea).
    3. He had problems staying focussed so I drew up a visual schedule for him. He loved this and was very proud that he was the only one allowed to use it. I would put up the pictures representing the subjects for the day, in order. As we finished that subject, he would get up and flip the picture over. That way he knew what was coming next and it kept him calm.
    I also had one of those big timer clocks that shows red and as the time counts down the red slowly disappears. I would give him a shorter time frame for each subject than other kids. ie. 10 minutes math, then 5 minutes playdough, 10 minutes math, then 5 minutes coloring. If you have a teacher's assistant then you could also have him/her take the student for a walk around the school twice a day.

    I wish you the best and hope some of these techniques help.
     
  6. autumnpumpkin

    autumnpumpkin Rookie

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    Aug 25, 2007

    Sorry I forgot to add we also used a gel seat for this student. I can't remember the name but it like a hot water bottle filled with water and placed on the students seat. The motion of the water when he sits on it gives him the feeling that he is moving and helps keep him from getting restless. I hope I explained that right.
     
  7. pamms

    pamms Comrade

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    Aug 26, 2007

    I think I'd be contacting my union about my rights (and the rights of the other students in the class). I do think that many of the ideas noted in other posts can work over time, but meanwhile, you and your class should not be placed in a dangerous situation. If this child is dangerous to himself and others, then he should not be in the regular classroom until strategies that work are found and in place. Those should first be established in a classroom designed to handle the situation. I agree that you need to be documenting everything also.
     
  8. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Aug 26, 2007

    I would agree that you need to try a few things consistently to see how it turns out. Also document everything. I had a student who did these sorts of things...she had ADHD and ODD. We did everything and so did the 3 previous schools before us. But, we also had a team of people from our school trying to help me out in the classroom and throwing ideas off of one another. In the end, the mom got fed up with us and our school because she just didn't want to hear that her daughter was like that AND her daughter was going to end up going to our BD program. (We tried everything.) She took her out and moved away.

    Bottom line...you shouldn't have to deal with this alone. Get a team together to figure out what to do. Put the child on a 504 behavior plan.
     
  9. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

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    Aug 26, 2007

    I agree upsadaisy, I've had kids like this before and you spend so much time on them and pull your hair out when eventually they take them out of your room to a BD unit or medicate them and finally it gets better. Tell your principal that you are already at wits end with this student and you want to start some sort of paperwork to have him visited by the school specialists. Maybe he could be self contained for an hour a day at least. Throwing things at you is kind of over the top behavior at this age.
     
  10. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Aug 27, 2007

    You should have an aid full time working with this child in your classroom. I am all for inclusion, feel very strongly about it, but the rights of the other kids to feel and be safe and secure in their classroom has to come first. I would document everything, get help from the office every single minute this child acts out. Don't put up with it for a second, call for help. It would be a huge issue if the child injured someone else in the class.
     
  11. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    Aug 27, 2007

    As stated in a previous post contact your union immediately and appraise them of the situation. Also, I cannot believe that the parents of the students in your room have not demanded that this child be taken out of the class for the safety of their own children.
     
  12. mom2sands

    mom2sands Comrade

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    Aug 27, 2007

    I agree that the other children's safety and your safety are of the utmost importance. There were two ODD both with ADHD and one Asperger in my 1st grade practicum class earlier this year. One ODD student was homebound in December and the other one was finally diagnosed in March and given medication which made a huge difference. This year both boys are in an ED class. Both liked to throw things, chairs, books, or whatever was handy at the time. The Asperger child had some ADHD tendencies, but he got his work done and was not aggressive towards others. These were all boys too. Diagnoses and school psychology reports can take months, but that student and the other students in the classroom as well as yourself are losing out in the meantime. In addition, there were two inclusion students who had been diagnosed with learning disabilities. It was quite the experience!
    I'm beginning my student teaching in an inclusion class, but I don't know of the student issues as of yet. I think it will be a good experience though.
     
  13. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Aug 28, 2007

    Working in a class that practices inclusion can be an immensely rewarding experience. It always seems like the ED child is the one who is there to get something extra from the other kids, but the reality is that the "regular" kids gain much more from the experience. All of us "regular" people NEED people around us who teach us to be patient, kind, considerate, thoughtful of others who might need our help, etc. Mom2sands, I think you have a great attitude and yes, it will probably be a wonderful experience! The key is having the proper support for the included students and the teacher.
     
  14. teach1st

    teach1st Comrade

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    Aug 28, 2007

    Try making him earn the responsiblity of being your right hand (helper). Anything that will keep him busy and on his toes at all times. I agree with everyone that he needs to be removed during his outbursts. Try to find his triggers for his outbursts and catch the outburst before it happens. Put an incentive chart on his desk and every time you find yourself praising him give him a sticker to put on his chart. The next day challenge him to get more stickers. When his chart is filled have a special reward for him. Allow him to stand at his desk to complete work if he cannont handle sitting in his chair. Try to keep your activities active if you can. This will keep him wanting to participate if he is moving to do the activity. GOOD LUCK!!!!! The other students will soon realize why he is getting different attention than them. I have an included student and the students understand the different reward and behavior modifications and don't complain. They don't complain because the student is not interupting all the time.
     
  15. two cute

    two cute New Member

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    Aug 30, 2007

    You need to get the other parents involved too. Our administrators listen to parents before they listen to teachers. Ask vocal parents to volunteer in your classroom so they become aware of the situation. All these other ideas are also important and need to be followed, but to help with teachingI had to give my direct lesson and immediately pull him to my work table to focus him and reteach, while the other students did the independent practice. But he would be out of the classroom before that time, if he didn't control his behavior during the direct lesson. He was picked up by his parents, if he could not handle the classroom. This was too much work for the parents, so they finally got him on meds. He sat in the back so he could move when he needed to, without everyone seeing him. The difference with meds just meant that he walked around the room quietly, instead of carrying chairs and rearranging the room. But he became more compliant, to the point where other students could tell him he needed to do something, and he would do it. Good luck!
     
  16. childcare teach

    childcare teach Comrade

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    Aug 30, 2007

    I TOTALY AGREE. HAVE YOU ASKED THE GUIDECENCE (sp) coulser for help? she may have ideas that she or he can share that might help. i hope it gets better. I think you need :hugs:
     
  17. two cute

    two cute New Member

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    Aug 30, 2007

    We don't have a guidance councilor! Our district only hires them when they have no choice, and then it is only part time. Which is why this forum is great. We can help each other.
     
  18. Sheila

    Sheila Comrade

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    Aug 30, 2007

    Strategies, tips and gimmicks are fine but do not hesitate to call the office. Be the squeaky wheel if needed. Your safety and the safety of the other children has to count as well. I had a student like this last year and it got progressivley(sp) worse no matter what strategies I used. The only way I could get any teaching done was to have him removed. He was finally placed in February. It was wonderful the rest of the year.

    I can also speak as a parent of a child with ADHD/Aspergers. My son was very disruptive in 2nd and 3rd. He is in counseling, on meds and has had behavioral therapy. We finally had a correct diagnosis this summer. We moved him to a private school that deals with exceptional children. He loves school now.
     
  19. dreaming_luke

    dreaming_luke Rookie

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    Sep 1, 2007

    Also as a parent with 2 special needs kids on the spectrum and ODD/ADD, I can relate. One thing that is very difficult for these kids is transitions. You mentioned he's new. That means that he may be in a different town, living in a different house, attending a new school, new kids, new routines. His life has turned upside down and he is not coping. I also would not wait for assessments and reports, you already know the behaviors that need to be addressed. It's important to do an analysis of the behavior to see what the antecedents are for these behaviors. The whole change in his life may be the trigger for all of them, however there may be something that is happening at specific times/places in the day that may be the trigger as well. I would have a parent meeting NOW! THEY are the experts of this child. They know what his triggers are, what works with the behaviors. Work with them and find out what works! Don't try to start from scratch and re-invent the wheel! He may need to be transitioned into your class gradually through gradual entry starting with a short amount of time only per day and working up gradually. Also, a backwards chain type of approach has worked well for my kids in which they came for last 1/2 hour of day, then last hour of day, then last 1 1/2 of day, and so on until they were integrated into the school and classroom for the full day. Easier on child, teacher, and other kids. Also, I see many safety concerns here for not only this student, but yourself and other students as well. YOU NEED A FULL-TIME AIDE NOW!!! Demand it, have your union with you on this request and the parents. What about the last school, what was going on there? Did he have good connections with one teacher, what was that person doing? Personally I would refuse to have him in my class without an aide AND A BEHAVIORAL PLAN IN PLACE. Once you meet with parents make a BEHAVIORAL PLAN. Know the antecedents and write up a very detailed and clear plan on how to deal with the behavior every time it happens. Bad piece of news here....behaviors will get worse for awhile with this, and then they will start to reduce and hopefully extinguish. Don't give up, persistence and consistency is the key. If you don't follow through you will never get it under control. Good luck and don't deal with this alone! :)
     
  20. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

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    Sep 2, 2007

    Autumnpumpkin you must be an amazing teacher. No way could I have put up with that for a whole year. Kudos to you girl! :up:
     
  21. luv2teach1

    luv2teach1 Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2007

    Yes...you do need to document and get help right away. Take it to your IAT team immediately. We have a student in 1st grade that came up from kdg who is autistic (but I think other issues as well). VERY similar behaviors. He has an aide specifically for him and she and the teacher had Stack(sp) training this summer to help him.
     
  22. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Sep 23, 2007

    I have only 9 students, but 4 have ADD, one of those has ODD, one has dyslexia, one has dysgraphia and possible aspbergers (or could be just brilliant), one has emotional problems related to divorce. This is in a regular private school. Only one child is on meds and they are being adjusted. Whew.

    I wish I could get gel chair cushions. Is there anything less expensive that is a good substitute? I feel like I'm teaching in a pinball machine.
     

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