Please help!! Toddler behaviour management

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Toddler-teacher, Mar 11, 2011.

  1. Toddler-teacher

    Toddler-teacher New Member

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    Mar 11, 2011

    :help::help::help::help::help::help:

    Hi, I work with toddlers and really need some suggestions as to how to encourage children between two and three to listen and behave apropriately, I find myself confronting one child in particular about his behaviour continuously, we are encouraged not to use time out and to instead take away the toys that the child is playing with however, this is not working and myself and the other childcare worker in the room are out of ideas. The child climbs on furniture and tears books, throws toys on the floor, won't share with other children, tears pictures off the walls. The child is consistently confronted,however, when confronted he thinks that it is funny. The child also engages in the same kind of negative behaviour at home. Any of your suggestions in relation to encouraging this 2 and a half year old child to behave positively would be very much appreciated thank you! :huh:
     
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  3. nyprekteacher85

    nyprekteacher85 Rookie

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    Mar 11, 2011

    I have a few like this myself! I am a big believer in natural conseqences. If you rip something off the wall you need to help the teacher staple or tape it back up...if you throw a toy you need to pick it. If they refuse which happens quite often, they are not allowed to play until they do the consequential activity. Usually they will start crying or whining...i let that go on for as long as it feels okay, then I say when you are done you can "pick up the block"(or whatever it was) and then you may pick another center. If they do not pick up the block they are redirected to sit at the table until they are ready to do so. When they finally agree, they pick it up and then choose another place to play. They are not allowed to play back at the same center when they ripped something, threw something or what not right away.

    Also, try to figure out what the underlying cause of it is...is she bored? Could you try to focus her attention on an activity or is she just trying to get attention, could you give her positive attention for completing an activity.

    My behavior problem child also get a lot better when I give her a job to do or make her my helper for a certain activity, so you could always try something like that as well. Good Luck!
     
  4. teacherR

    teacherR Companion

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    Mar 16, 2011

    I teach preschool and I too have some children like this in my 3's class. One of the things that helps is praising the child whenever I see them doing something right. It does not matter if it is something you have instructed them to do or not. For example if they are playing nicely in art center go over and tell them what a good job they are doing. If you catching them doing things the way you would like them to and praise them for it they will be more likely to continue the postive behavior. Gush, gush, gush!!

    I would definetly use logical consequences. If they rip something down make them put it back up. If they are jumping off tables take them off without saying anything and put them on the floor. If you pay very little attention to them they will more then likely stop. It is either they want attention and will take whatever they can get, postivie of negative or that they are bored.
     
  5. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Mar 16, 2011

    Very good answers. I would just like to add, that when the child isn't sharing and you are told to take the toy and remove it...that is very validating for the child as now the toy is not in action anymore and is "out of commission". Same as "saved". I am fine with not using time out, but don't time out toys either.

    If some toys are more often involved in this issue than perhaps a small look at room design and how well we are using the centers that are available is in order. If all is well there, then I would say you are totally on to logical consequenses (not always a toy time out) and waiting until you are ready to clean. This could be a problem for admin to see, as it may look like time out. Explain that you haven't placed the child there. They are free to join the group WHEN they do the activity you requested. This works well for my group.

    In addition please make sure your day has enough large motor time. Some children, my son included, act out when there isn't enough large motor time. Again, if all is well......great! That means you are doing well and sooner or later the child will come around.

    Let us know what you decide will work best, and how it changes the situation. :hugs:
     
  6. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Mar 17, 2011

    I would advise looking both at your environment and your schedule to see if improvements in either would help. Too much unstructured time without any direction can cause behavior like this, too enough interaction with adults, too many transitions, too many toys or inapproriate ones, inconsistency in schedule or rules, etc. Of course, it can also just be a challenging kid. Good luck.
     
  7. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Mar 17, 2011

    Hmmm, this is a bit of an off-the-wall suggestion -- but a lot of these kinds of issues are dealt with among Japanese children by imparting feelings to objects. So, a child who throws the toy not only have the toy taken away, but the adult may also go on about how "poor" the toy is to have been treated meanly, might ask the toy if it's okay, and might have the child apologize to the toy (or wall, couch, whatever).

    This anthropomorphizing takes place in other contexts also. Adults will blame the furniture if their child gets hurt on it, chastising it for being careless. Sometimes, a guilty piece of furniture (or an innocent piece of furniture if it's "strong") will be the targeted recipient of the pain from a child's injury ("Ouchie, ouchie, fly away.... to the table!").

    I suspect this has an effect even when the child is completely aware that these things are inanimate objects.
     
  8. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Mar 17, 2011

    I must say, "our books like to be read, not squished into the ground" many times a day!
     

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