Please any advice, Teaching refugees

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by svg, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. svg

    svg Rookie

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    Sep 26, 2009

    Hi there, I've just started teaching a new class of first graders ages 5-8 and would really appreciate any suggestions.

    I was browsing this site among others trying to come up with creative ideas to capture my students attention. However their seems to be the on going dilemma of accessing materials. All of your suggestions have to do with materials unavailable to our school.

    We are based in a refugee camp that already has a lack of funding. I have spent some of my own money buying construction paper and what not. I loved the 'apple tree idea' for discipline.

    If anyone has some inexpensive ideas of how we can maintain the classroom, keep the students attention, and motivate- please let me know!

    Thanks so much,
    Sierra

    * and of course I'm already storing up recyclables for art projects!
     
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  3. missamie

    missamie Rookie

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    Sep 26, 2009

    First: God Bless you Sierra! Prayers for what you are doing!
    :hugs:
    When I first began teaching I worked in the inner city and also bought all my own materials.

    One thing I did was use a modified version of "Workshop Way" which is having a list of tasks for your children to work on independantly every day - it can be placed on the board or a wall - the order always stays the same. I used that time to call the children up in small instruction groups. They did them in the same order every day - a handwriting sheet, we called it touch bump, I drew it on the board and they used lined paper, I'd put up 4-6 math problems for them to copy (we had limited use of a copy machine) or you could use whatever math sheet that they can do independantly - practice addition/subtraction (I think part of the procedure was to draw the dots next to each number) - a half sheet - it shouldn't take them too long, you can add whatever you want here - I had an extend the pattern page - a writing prompt. . .you can use whatever you'd like, but it becomes routine. I usually ended with reading and then a fun activity - not all my students finished all the tasks every day.

    Make class books for the children to contribute to and practice reading. These were always a favorite for the children to read. They can be in shapes. They can be math, poetry, science or social studies topics.

    Shaving cream activities - shaving cream smells nice, cleans the table and works great for large motor writing practice - practice writing letters and words or even drawing simple pictures. Plus when mixed with equal part glue becomes puffy paint;)

    Addition or alphabet games - around the world - have the children compete to say the number, letter, addition fact quickest and advance to the next child until one child has gone around the whole room and returned to his seat.

    Morning Message activities where the children contribute to the day's message and/or fix capitol letters, spelling, punctuation - whatever you're working on.

    Can you have a class pet? Hamster, lizard? That 's exciting for the children and spending time with it can be a reward not to mention feeding it. Heck - when we had our lizard, some of the feeder crickets became our "Pets" and we learned about crickets and were able to keep them alive for quite a while. We currently have a praying mantis we found on the playground. :cool:

    Sandpaper can make great letters for cutting and word building in a center, or if you can create a class set of letters (printed or on index cards) for small group or whole group word building that's usually fun for the kids.

    I'll keep thinking of ideas! Good luck:hugs:
     
  4. svg

    svg Rookie

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    Sep 26, 2009

    Thanks a lot for your ideas! I really appreciate it.

    I will be going to the local market this week but for the most part no, we only have access to the chalkboard.
    Thanks again,

    Sierra
     
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Sep 26, 2009

    The only thing I can suggest is that you make sure your students know you love them no matter what. I have a lot of kids who have babies or who have overcome drugs / drinking / gangs. I love them all.
     

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