Pleasant but non-compliant student

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by Little Monster, Sep 17, 2011.

  1. Little Monster

    Little Monster Rookie

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    Sep 17, 2011

    I have been dealing with a new problem (for me) and was hoping to get some of the awesome advice I find here so often.

    I have a student that is new to the school this year. He is repeating the grade after refusing to do any work last year at his previous school. He is a very pleasant child that gets along well with his classmates. His test results (that he has actually taken) have shown him to be one of the better academic performers in the class (though, he is repeating the grade).

    He simply refuses to do work. Specifically, he refuses to write the most.

    I have tried giving him praise, encouraging him, and offering rewards. I have taken away recess (to do the work he is missing), not given him treats (school-wide leveling system denies rewards to students below level four). Nothing seems to really motivate him to work.

    When I do get him to work, it normally will be with me sitting in a chair next to his desk as he works. As soon as I walk away, his pencil drops and he ceases to work. It seems that his non-compliant behavior is attention seeking. The other afternoon he owed his recess due to his behavior. There was one other student that owed some time off recess for a different reason. The other student was tapping his pencil, which I asked him to stop. A few moments later my non-compliant student began tapping his behavior. This got me wondering... I said nothing and after a few moments he increased the speed/volume of his tapping. Again, I said nothing and a few moments later he started to drag his feet on the carpet.

    I am not sure about his home life, however, his mother has not been much assistance up to this point.

    I am just trying to piece together a decent plan to get him on-track. I was thinking of doing some sort of reward program that will come with his compliance with consequences attached for his non-compliance. Any ideas?
     
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  3. 1st-yr-teacher

    1st-yr-teacher Comrade

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    Sep 17, 2011

    http://www.interventioncentral.org/

    This website has some neat behavior interventions that are created for specifically RtI documentation. It does have some good behavior plans. I believe there is one that is designed for the studnet who is an attention seeker...good luck!

    Attention seeking behaviors are tough to overcome. Especially if they don't care whether it is positive or negative.
     
  4. 1st-yr-teacher

    1st-yr-teacher Comrade

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  5. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Sep 17, 2011

    You can bring a horse to water, but you can't make him drink. He may not pass again if he continues down this path. I'd advise keeping a daily behavior intervention log. Has he been seen by the school psychologist?
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 18, 2011

    What is his writing like when you do stay beside him long enough for him to complete it? Is he able to give responses orally to demonstrate his understanding?
     
  7. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Sep 18, 2011

    I have a student who is very similar to this child. He has an RTi folder and all of his documentation from the previous year has been on not complying and doing assignments. I started watching what he does do when he is working. I started seeing a pattern. I think the student is actually dyslexic. He is very smart and therefore copes by doing the absolute minimum with a lot of teacher direction. However I think his dyslexia is pretty severe. We gave him a screener and sure enough... we are seeing that he does show the signs. I am now keeping a very different type of RTi documentation, allowing for some accommodations and giving specific interventions for kids with dyslexia. He is actually progressing and becoming more independent.

    I know this may not be your kiddos problem, but as someone suggested, there must be an underlying reason why he is craving this attention. I also have a select mute in my class. In my class, my select mute talks, asks questions, shares, talks into a microphone. In my teaching partners class, she won't utter a word. And she barely speaks to ME when I walk into that room. Ummm...???

    The difference is that I constantly praise the child, tell her she is smart, ask her to come up and teach with me, and expect that she is going to be this outgoing person. When I found out that she was a select mute... I was SHOCKED. I just happened to tap into her brain. It was a complete accident.

    Kids are tough. We just have to figure out what makes them tick. Is it academic? I think with both my students that is the case. My select mute is terrified of MATH and refuses to speak. She feels confident in L.A. and is a flower that is blossoming. Both kids are way SMART and are just using the strategies that have helped them cope. Now we need to teach them some new strategies.
     
  8. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Sep 18, 2011

    BTW--- I LOVE the website mentioned!
     
  9. Little Monster

    Little Monster Rookie

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    Sep 18, 2011

    Some interesting ideas here!

    In regards to his writing, I was almost starting to wonder if he had was overly sensitive to his hand writing... he writes very slowly/carefully and will erase even minor 'glitches' in his writing. His penmanship is not perfect, but far better than one would expect from a boy of his age. I have not been able to get a full sample of his writing, so unfortunately he marks below what I know his ability would be if he put forth some effort.

    I am somewhat interested in the Dyslexia theory. I myself am Dyslexic and both an avid reader and writer, but those skills took time to develop. I have run Dibbles on him and he did read at grade level speeds with very few errors; however, his retells consisted of maybe four words and a shoulder shrug.

    The school year just started, so he has not been to see the school councilor yet, though that should be happening very soon.

    Thanks for the replies and advice so far... keeping me busy today!
     
  10. yearroundteach

    yearroundteach Companion

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    Sep 18, 2011

    I was wondering if you would be able to tell me some of the interventions and accommodations that you are using with the child above or where you found the resources. I have a child that seems to have some signs of dyslexia. He is "in line" to be tested but in my school that could mean months or even an entire school year. I don't want to let all that time go by with me doing nothing or completing interventions that may not be best suited to him.

    My school/district expects interventions to be completed however supplies very little resources to do so. I have been scouring the internet on dyslexia but have found very little in the area of specific interventions and strategies. Disclaimer...I realize I cannot diagnose a child as I am not qualified to do so; but if I will be doing interventions anyway, I may as well be doing some that I suspect may be helpful. Thanks for any help you can give. And sorry to the original poster for the temporary hyjack of the thread. :blush:
     
  11. Rosy0114

    Rosy0114 Rookie

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    Sep 18, 2011

    True Dyslexia is rare and difficult to diagnose. Issues with reading and writing are more often related to the way the brain processes the information. The majority of these students are not dyslexic. Students can be taught ways to overcome and work through their struggles with processing. I call this "building bridges" in their brains. Unfortunately, before trying strategies, it is easiest if you figure out if the information is getting jumbled up going in - or if the information is getting jumbled up coming out. Then you adapt and teach students bridges to gain input of information or to maximize output of information.
     
  12. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Sep 22, 2011

    Regarding the original post, I think the first step is figuring out why the refusal is going on. A couple of clues for where to look further: you said he is generally pleasant and well-liked, and you mentioned that it occurs most often during writing time. These two things indicate that it may be more likely due to an issue with writing. Possibly not, but maybe. Certainly a good place to start looking.

    One thing to do to test this out is to drop expectations related to writing for a brief period of time (e.g., 2 days). See if he refuses to do other things. If not, that's a good indication that the behavior is specifically to avoid writing. In that case, there are a few more follow-up things to assess, such as his academic confidence level with writing, his preferences related to writing, etc. But, I'd generally assess whether it's even writing.

    If the refusal happens with other things, including non-academic things (e.g., lining up to come in for recess), it may not be related to writing specifically, but rather just nonpreferred tasks more generally, in which case there'd be a few other things to check out.

    Another thought: it could be early in enough in the year that refusal hasn't started with other things, but it may be coming. If he was transferred out of school because of not doing any work, my guess is that it's likely due to more than just writing refusal.

    One other side note - when pinpointing the cause of behavior, be aware that there may be primary and secondary "functions" or purposes of behavior. For example, it could be that the writing refusal started because of avoidance of a difficult subject, but that he learned that such refusal also brought him attention. In this case, there are layered functions - in other words, more than one reason why something is happening. If you only "treat" the secondary function (e.g., attention), but leave the primary function "untreated," you won't reduce the behavior.

    All of that being said, I'd suggest starting with isolating writing as a cause by removing it, observing any change or lack of change, and posting your findings back here.
     

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