Playing with the idea of flipping my geometry classes

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by Aliceacc, Aug 28, 2012.

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  1. rnehila

    rnehila New Member

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    Sep 15, 2012

    I forgot to mention I just do a screencast of the powerpoint. I downloaded the trial for a fancy program-Camtasia 8, but you can do it for free with screencastomatic (online not sure if I can post links) :) Then I upload to youtube and embed into Edmodo. This way kids only have to go to one website, and they don't have to search or see sketchy ads on youtube.
     
  2. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 15, 2012

    I'm not sure I'll ever do a "real flip."

    I like the interaction as I give notes, the questions that come up that are sometimes unpredictable.

    But I think I'll endup settling into a slow "rollover" in my approach. There are some lessons that the kids CAN do on their own, buying me more class time for problem solving. And they seem to really be enjoying this way of taking notes, once we get past the 5 or 6 kids having trouble getting the links to work.

    Most definitely a work in progress.
     
  3. McParadigm

    McParadigm Companion

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    Sep 15, 2012

    Like I said, I think that "flipping" the classroom is a great starting point, but that it doesn't start to reach full potential until it incorporates constructivist designs.

    I used PowerPoints, as well, but I always focused on interaction and exploration instead of the "transmission" approach to learning. A lot of the time, this meant building interfaces like this one:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The nice thing about those types of things was that I could just change the content and reuse them, once I had one built. I also was able to incorporate a lot more multimedia and focusing audio that way.
     
  4. McParadigm

    McParadigm Companion

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    Sep 17, 2012

    Thought about this thread again today as I was working on a simulator to let kids explore the difference between binary and base ten systems. Some screenshots:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'm pretty pursuant of any active learning-inspired classroom flip designs...am I alone in this?
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 21, 2012

    Tonight they're watching an episode of Cyberchase--my favorite kids' TV show.

    We're at the point in the syllabus where they're getting lots of definitions. It's a Friday, so it won't kill me to surprise them with a fun assignment.
     
  6. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Sep 21, 2012

    Definitions are easy to remember for me when you are applying them to a problem.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 21, 2012

    Right, but we're not quite there yet. The start of geometry is the time when you lay the groundwork for all the problems yet to come. It's like learning a new language.

    The homework problems in the book tend to be pretty basic. So tonight, my kids can watch an episode from their childhood, and see geometry in action.
     
  8. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Sep 21, 2012

    Is any other Geometry or math teacher for that matter flipping their class?
     
  9. McParadigm

    McParadigm Companion

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    Sep 21, 2012

    And also, still wondering:

     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 21, 2012

    What do you mean?
     
  11. McParadigm

    McParadigm Companion

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    Sep 21, 2012

    Not unlike the examples I posted above. I just mean flipping in a way that allows students to interact with content and evaluate their understanding as they prepare for a lesson, rather than having them be passive participants who watch a video or presentation.

    Sometimes it's as simple as putting together three or four ways of intaking the material, and letting them decide which formats to investigate...or organizing it in a way that lets them explore it. I also like giving them the chance to try immediate feedback examples prior to coming to class...I find it makes them a lot more brave about attempting material in front of others (and feeling confident from the start boosts their engagement as well, in my experience)

    Not that I'm saying video isn't valuable. I like incorporating it..for example, in one prep activity I made for my English class on the subject of making predictions about characters, they looked at and answered questions about example paragraphs. But since this was a part of the exploration process, not a grading scenario, they were able to click on a TV in the corner of "the room" (the paragraphs and questions appeared on a chalk board at the center of the image) and play a short assistive video for each problem. It was just me recorded with my webcam, but I added a few buttons so they could ask specific questions and get my assistance in that way. I also branched the quiz, so that students would get higher or lower reading level paragraphs depending on their level of success. It was an easy way to check up on individuals I was worried about...no grading involved, just moving around the room during the group work the next day and talking with students, letting them bring up some of the paragraphs they saw or thought interesting.

    It takes a bit of work (depending on how worked up and inventive you get, it can take anywhere from 2-6 hours), but doing a few at a time and saving them over the years, it adds up. And PowerPoint is a pretty easy program to work with, so it's not too difficult to do. I also tend to make the PowerPoints simple the first time through, and then just add a little bit more every time I reuse them.

    Honestly, having gone that route now I can't imagine ever wanting to go back. But it's an unexpectedly lonely excitement...not only can't I find anybody else who is doing it to engage with, but I can't seem to find anybody else who WANTS to. And that sort of baffles me.
     
  12. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 21, 2012

    I found a wonderful resource!!!

    Our school has renewed our subscription to Discoveryeducation.com It's a wealth of videos (and still photography, I think)

    Not sure how much it costs the school, or whether it's possible or feasible to register as an individual, but it's well worth looking into!
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 22, 2012

    A month and a half into the new school, and I've got to say: I LOVE my new way of approaching geometry!

    I find that I have so much more time to spend on problem solving than ever before!!!

    It's far from a total "flip"-- I just don't see that matching my teaching style. But I'm loving my "slow rollover!!!" And the kids are loving it too, they're very enthusiastic!
     
  14. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Oct 22, 2012

    Thanks for the update, Alice. I've been wondering how it was working for you.
     
  15. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Oct 22, 2012

    I'm so glad to hear it's working out for you!

    I have also changed the way I teach math this year (I know, grade 1 is totally different from what you're doing) and I am finding I am able to address individual needs better.
     
  16. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 1, 2012

    I've LOVED my new teaching style, but I'm thinking I may have to change it again this year.

    I'm not sure which kids have what supplies; I'm sure the kids near the shore lost anything that wasn't in their lockers. So I don't think I can assume even textbooks, much less computer access.

    I think that I may have to plan on the rest of the year without real homework. (Our textbook was discontinued over the summer-- AFTER we checked with the publisher in the spring. copies on amazon were running $300 BEFORE the storm.)

    When we get back to school, I'll check with the other geometry teachers and the chair about changing the syllabus. We could probably drop a topic or two-- say Volume and Surface Area, I'm not sure what else at the moment-- and allow us more time to slow down to accomodate the loss of textbooks and home computers.
     
  17. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Nov 2, 2012

    I think Fred Jones' "visual lesson plan" is great for teaching multi-step math problems such as high school math. I'd check out the book Tools for Teaching by Fred Jones.
     
  18. wcormode

    wcormode Rookie

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    Nov 2, 2012

    I have been trying to get used to the idea of flipping my class before/if we get a 1:1 initiative. Because of our poverty rate I cannot assign my videos as homework but instead I show them during class while I am checking notebooks and grading homework quizzes.

    My Geometry kids seem to like it okay but my seniors absolutely hate it. I try to explain that it gives them more time to work because I can be more focused and concise when I am recording. Before I did this I was assigning homework to my seniors with a minute left in class and now they have 20-30 minutes to work.

    What do you all think of showing recorded lessons while you are actually present in the room?
     
  19. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    What do you all think of showing recorded lessons while you are actually present in the room?

    Only if the recorded lesson is 5 minutes or less. Anything else and it is too passive during a time where you should be interacting and helping the students.
     
  20. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Nov 2, 2012

    I show them during class while I am checking notebooks and grading homework quizzes.

    I don't like this at all. Grading should be done during your planning and never during class. You could pull a student that you know is having difficulty and help that student then.
     
  21. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 2, 2012

    Why would you do that? The reason I sometimes assign videos as homework is to give me more class time to work on problem solving. But if I'm in the class, I would just give the explanation. That way you can answer any questions that come up.

    If I'm in the room as the explanation is going on, the only way I would be doing it by video would be if I had severe laryngitis.

    What course do you teach your Seniors?
     
  22. Jeky

    Jeky Comrade

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    Nov 2, 2012

    I have done it a couple time this year, but each video is less than 5 minutes. I use Edmodo and students frequently ask homework questions at night on our class Edmodo website. Since math is often hard to explain in print, I often make a quick video, khan-academy style, to answer their questions. I use a very easy and awesome app called Educreations. Every once in awhile, if multiple students ask the same question, I will show that video during warm-up time the next day. Sure I could sit there and explain it, but the video helps to engage those students who are probably going to tune me out anyways (just like they tuned me out the first 1,000 times I explained it in class).

    Showing a video in place of an actual lecture? That I would find hard to justify.......
     
  23. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 3, 2012

    My apologies if I was unclear. That's the idea I was reacting to-- replacing your teaching with a full period video while you were in the room doing something else.

    Showing a short clip makes sense under circumstances like the ones you've described.
     
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