Plants in the classroom

Discussion in 'General Education' started by missalli, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. missalli

    missalli Companion

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    Hey all. I want to bring some plants into my classroom this year to help soften up what is otherwise a pretty sterile looking space. But I don't exactly have a green thumb or a whole lot of plant knowledge, so I was hoping for some suggestions for a couple of indoor plants that...

    - Don't mind if they get touched once in a while by little fingers
    - Won't die from lack of watering over the weekend
    - Can withstand our wonderful florescent lighting

    Thanks!

    Alli
     
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  3. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    J.E.A.L.O.U.S. We can't have plants =(

    Not that mine would survive anyways. lol
     
  4. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Make sure none of your students have plant allergies first.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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  6. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    a silk plant!
     
  7. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    There's a drippy plant (trailing? You know what I mean) colloquially known as Chain Plant, Wandering Jew, or purple heart plant. It's easy, easy and fairly attractive.

    Rubber plants are easy to grow, also. I have one and it's doing fine. I agree with Czacza about snake plants (also known as Mother In Law's Tongue). Consider Christmas cactus, and you'll get pretty blooms around the holidays. Sometimes jade plants will do well in a classroom - they occasionally get a rot problem and die, but they're cheap and often they do well. If you grow jade plants or Christmas cactus, try putting some sand in the potting soil or buying the potting soil made for cactus and succulents.
     
  8. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    I have a peace lily & it does well in the classroom. I also have these big leafy things that grow really well.I don't know what they're called, but they always have them hanging at Lowes & Home Depot.

    Bamboo plants have not done well in my classrooms. It could just be me though.the custodians like to joke with me on how long my plants last. =)

    Here's a link that may help.I also suggest going to the local stores & telling them that you're looking for a classroom plant. They'll be able to help you. I usually go to my local Lowes. :D

    http://gardening.about.com/od/houseplants/a/EasyHouseplants.htm
     
  9. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I like the look of plants, but have a really hard time keeping them up. I end up getting new plants every year!! I buy them on sale at the beginning of the year.

    In my house, I have had really good luck with a "Money Tree." I got it when I bought my condo, and a over a year later, it's thriving and green!
     
  10. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Bamboo plants are great (and you can decorate them with little pandas, tee hee!). I've also had English ivy in my room, and it grows well with no windows or natural light. I have a "wandering Jew" at my house, and it does well at home. It's ridiculously easy to transplant, too. You don't even have to root it. You just break off some vines and put it in new soil. After a few days, it roots itself.
     
  11. Aussiegirl

    Aussiegirl Habitué

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    I've had a pothos in my room for years - it has gotten huge. I just pinch back the trailing vines from time to time and it forces new shoots. I like it because it tolerates being dry from time to time without browning and dying. Also, it is variegated - not all one color, so I think it brightens things up even more. I do put it in the office or another teacher's room that has windows for Thanksgiving and Christmas break so it gets some light. I may have to give that up if it gets much larger.:D
     
  12. missalli

    missalli Companion

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    Thanks for the ideas, everyone!
     
  13. Maxadoodle

    Maxadoodle Comrade

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    One of the other teachers sprouted a sweet potato in a jar of water (suspended with toothpicks) and it grew into a long vine. The kids loved seeing the roots, the potato, and how long the vine grew.

    I don't have much luck with plants, so after Halloween we watch a pumpkin decompose in a sealed jar. Disgusting, but very cool.
     
  14. Andrea L

    Andrea L Habitué

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    Go buy a fake plant or two. I bought some at IKEA this year because my plants always die in my room. I can keep plants alive at home without any problem, but my classroom is too cold and dark. ROSS/Marshals also sell fake plants for pretty reasonable.
     
  15. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Pothos are a good, hardy choice. They also do not flower, so there aren't allergy issues. After one of my ornery boys ate a couple of leaves, we learned that they don't warrant a trip to the ER. Poison control handled that one for us.

    I have a couple of silk plants. They're my favorites. Green without the care.
     
  16. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    :spitwater: LOL! That's hilarious!
     
  17. missalli

    missalli Companion

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    Oh thanks for the tips! Fake plants always seem so expensive when I see them out in the stores.
     
  18. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    I managed to have two spider plants thrive all year so I can recommend them. I also have a couple of pots of drought tolerant succulents which are easy to care for. I have a lot (I am not kidding) of butterfly weed I leave in pots so I can rotate them inside and outside as I am raising the Monarchs. I have 31 pots eaten down to the nubs right now I am trying to bring back to life. Only about 6 caterpillars left - about 60 chrysalis and have already released about 150 butterflies - a bumper year!
     
  19. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

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    I love silk plants (I have a fairly serious brown thumb), but check your fire codes - we can't have any fake plants because of our fire codes.
     
  20. Dave NJ

    Dave NJ Rookie

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    What a great way to help make your classroom a positive place to learn!
     
  21. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    I agree with Spider Plants and Christmas Cactus- I have a Christmas Cactus that I keep in my classroom- right now its home with me, but it is potted in an old fashioned tea kettle- so it is really cute. It rarely needs water and surprise of all surprises it is still alive and survived the year in kindergarten! Not only did it have me to survive, but a class of kinders- talk about an easy plant! If we didn't kill it- nothing will.
     
  22. IEDUK8

    IEDUK8 Rookie

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    I'm in a portable with VERY little natural light. :(

    I've always appreciated how hardy pothos are. Do you think they could handle a room with such little light (other than the fluorescent lights)? :)
     
  23. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    I brought one in last year - and I made sure I put it behind my desk away from prying little hands.
     
  24. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Found this for you:
    The green variety can take low light, but the variegated ones prefer medium light. The variegated types will live in lower light, but their variegation may fade. Pothos can take bright light if necessary, but not direct sun- The leaves will scorch.

    I'd give it a try...
     
  25. IEDUK8

    IEDUK8 Rookie

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    Thanks for the information, czacza; I should have just looked it up myself! :) (I promise to be less lazy once school starts! LOL)

    I appreciate your help!
     
  26. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I've had my pothos going for MANY years in differing amounts of light. I should probably repot it before I go back to school...note to self.:)
     
  27. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Aloe plants are really hard to kill. "Hens and chicks" are also easy to take care of - at the farmer's market the guy who sells plants has a sign on them that says "Thrives on neglect" lol.
     
  28. historynut

    historynut Rookie

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    I was given one and it survived great until it was forgotten in my room over Christmas Break. :lol:
     
  29. midwestteacher

    midwestteacher Cohort

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    Purple hearts won't appreciate the low light conditions and will lose their color. Rubber plants will be ok and slow growing too. That may be a bonus for you.
     

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