plagiarism

Discussion in 'General Education' started by newteacher6, May 13, 2012.

  1. newteacher6

    newteacher6 Rookie

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    May 13, 2012

    If a student of yours plagiarizes(sp.?) What do you do ? If its on an important project, do you give then a 0? Or have them redo it ? They provided a resource list but it is still plagiarism if they dont put it into their own words. Also, I get anxiety when grading papers and projects. I feel like since we are human we can't be completely accurate when grading. What i mean is, do you look at a rubric and then compare two students work and think whyd you give one student a better grade then the other ?? Idk its hard to explain what i mean lol its late and im delirious.
     
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  3. bros

    bros Phenom

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    May 14, 2012

    How old is the student?

    Do they know what plagiarizing is?

    Did they copy it direct from the internet and not even rephrase what they found online?

    If they are lower elementary, have them redo it. Use this as an opportunity to teach what plagiarism is
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 14, 2012

    There are a lot of variables.

    First and foremost, how old are your kids??? Aren't you teaching middle school?? Did they fully understand the need to rephrase? MANY kids think that as long as they paraphrase, there's no need for a citation. The odds are pretty good that if your kids are pretty young and DID have a works cited area, they simply misunderstood. So I think I would consider this less an issure of plagiarism and more one of needing to teach this particular concept.

    Also, what's the school/department policy? The odds are good that there's already one in place. After all, while you are new to the school, the issue is an old one that existed long before you. Talk to other teachers and see how your school handles it.

    As to consistency in grading-- it can take a while to get into a solid routine. What may help is writing, right on your copy of the rubric, how much you take off for the mistakes that show up a lot. For example, on Friday's geometry test, I had a bunch of kids who skipped the same step. I wrote on my rubric: "Definition of perpendicular, -2" so I would take off the same amount for that particular mistake.

    Finally, it looks like it was almost midnight on a Sunday when you posted-- you're on the east coast like me, right?

    That was way too late to still be grading. It's not good for you; you need to get some sleep. I realize it was Mother's Day and you may have had a busy weekend. But you still need to ensure that you get to sleep early enough that you don't start the week tired and anxious.
     
  5. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

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    May 14, 2012

    We have a pretty draconian policy re plagiarism, and we follow it. The students had a hand in fashioning it. If your school has a policy, you should follow it to the letter, particularly as a newer teacher.

    Grades, in the English biz, at least, are inescapably to some degree subjective. Such is life, no? We do what we can, of course, but the "solutions" - rubrics and so forth - can be worse than the original problem, sometimes trivializing the grading process, reducing it to bean counting. Doing our best is - well - the best we can do.
     
  6. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    May 14, 2012

    I teach seniors who, at this point, should know better. They get a zero but are allowed to redo the assignment for full credit. That way, they still learn the material for the assignment and get a life lesson without permanent scarring on their grades.
     
  7. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

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    May 14, 2012

    We're not nearly so kind. It's an irredeemable zero, parents called in, detention for a while, and the guidance counselor must mention it in the letter of rec. If it's a senior already in college, we notify the college. One student had his acceptance to an Ivy League school rescinded as a result a few years ago.
     
  8. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

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    May 14, 2012

    We have a similar policy to TeachOn...grade is a zero, semester grade lowered one full letter grade, and we have had seniors get college acceptances rescinded as well...but I honestly think the problem would be MUCH worse than it currently is without these harsh penalties...that's why we emphasize it so much with them, and then follow through when they commit the act...when they complain that the penalty is too harsh, I ask them "why is a handicapped parking ticket $300+? Because we don't want you to do it..." Same thing with cheating/plagarism...

    For our school, though, with cheating, if one student copies off of another, we punish both parties with the same penalty.
     
  9. ELA

    ELA New Member

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    May 14, 2012

    I usually judge plagerism by whether or not I can highlight the similar sentences/phrases in both essays. If I can, then both students have to rewrite them. If it happens again, I tell the students, they get a zero and don't get the chance to rephrase it.

    It is definitely subjective though, because sometimes the - students who are very low and really struggling inadvertantly copy my model or the models I use from other students, and don't even realize it. In those cases, I usually help them rephrase it and don't make a big deal out of it.
     
  10. KatieShow

    KatieShow Rookie

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    May 24, 2012

    Before assigning any writing projects that could include plagarism (projects, say. Not like regular hw.), always review what plagarism is, and what the consequences are. Your school might have a specific policy.
    Interestingly, my seniors just turned in their final research projects. I got one that was completely cut and paste. As a grown up, you can pretty much tell when a kid has plagarized. Google the sentence, and it comes right up.
    The kid gets a 0 for the project. For him, that means he fails the quarter and doesn't graduate.
     

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