phonics lesson

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by dunwool, Mar 11, 2008.

  1. dunwool

    dunwool Rookie

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    Mar 11, 2008

    I am working with a student on long /a/ patterns and ck, k, and ke sounds. Do you know of any resources that I can access with those patterns in mind. I have used the words their way word sort, but I need something more... a book, a mini lessons, something. Thanks for the help!
     
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  3. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Mar 11, 2008

    Well one thing is you can tell the kids they will never have a long a with a ck. The pattern for ck is that it always follows short vowels. sometimes knowing rules like that helps.

    Also, k is usually at the end of a word and follows another consonant, c at the beginning of a word and if followed by i, e or y says /s/.
     
  4. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Mar 11, 2008

    I never noticed that c is usually at the beginning while k is usually at the end, following another consonant! You learn something new every day :)

    Also, I found that it helps to label ce, ci, cy as "soft c" while the rest are "hard c".

    Same with g: ge, gi, gy can be labeled as a "soft g" while the rest are "hard g".

    I have also found that sometimes all the child needs is to be told what the "rule" is and with reinforcement and lots of practice, it seems to stick.

    Dunwool: I would teach the rules separately. I would start with short a, incuding the ck. Make sure that is pretty solid before you move on to the other rules.

    Next, I would do long a, and teach the "magic e" rule. The e magically makes the vowel say it's name.
    Or you can introduce it like this: When you have a consonant-vowel-consonant - e word, the e jumps over to the vowel and asks "what's your name?" (The e is a very friendly vowel!) and the vowel says it's name in that word.

    However you decide to introduce them, I would make sure she has the ck, down before you mix in the -ake word family. Good luck!
     
  5. Eddie

    Eddie Companion

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    Mar 12, 2008

    I'm not sure if this child is reading, but here's an idea:
    If you can get a hold of a National Geographic Kids magazine. I would find a high interest article, copy it, and have the student use a highlighter to find soft c, then hard c words, etc. within the article. Kids love using the highlighter and if it's a high interest article it adds to the motivation.
     

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