phonemic awareness and phonics

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by TamiJ, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Aug 26, 2012

    Can you just tell me what this looks like in your classroom? How much DI are you doing, then what do the kids do? I am changing things around a bit, which is why I question.
     
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  3. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Aug 26, 2012

    Oh, after DI I will pull a group (I have not started pulling groups yet), and others work on words by: play-doh spelling, making words, rainbow spelling, writing words on their whiteboards, etc.
     
  4. Tek

    Tek Comrade

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    Aug 27, 2012

    I'm curious about this too, as this is my first year teaching phonics and I'm wondering what's a dynamic way to teach it. I did a lot of DI the first week, but know there are other methods.

    I've heard that the book WORDS THEIR WAY is a great resource

    I feel like I got a good hook. I tell the kids we're gonna be cops, and it's our job to capture all the sounds in our head. They love that, but then I go into DI.

    Any veteran phonics teachers here who can help the rest of us rookies? Thanks.
     
  5. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    The Threads of Reading by Karen Tankersley was a great book that taught me a lot about the process. I am not in Early Childhood but I realized that even after graduating from a teacher prep program I didn't understand the process of learning to read. I felt this book solidified it for me in a very simple way. Also includes many examples.
     
  6. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I've taught it to my first graders at my last school, but they were really the age of second graders and needed less phonics. Now I am teaching pre-first, which is the age of first graders in the states and this is when they really learn to read and write, so I don't know if what I've done in the past will be enough for them. Boy there is such a huge difference from first grade to second...
     
  7. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 27, 2012

    1. There is a huge difference between phonemic awareness and phonics.
    2. Phonemic awareness activities can basically be done in the dark - no pencils needed, only ears and brains actively listening. In fact, I do PA activities with my kiddos every day during whole group - I have them close their eyes and place their thumbs over their hearts. Then I tell them what sound they need to listen for, and I call out a series of words, some with the sound, and others without. It teaches them to focus on the sounds.
    3. I also do PA with my lowest babies, who sometimes don't even know their alphabet. I use Elkonin boxes and markers of some kind, that the kiddos move one marker (counting chip, block, etc) for each sound they hear. It can also be done for each word in a sentence.
    4. Phonics is the study of the spelling patterns (the written form of the sounds). We map our spelling words every week. I also do lots of decoding activities.
    I'm not sure if any of this will help - I'm running on no sleep, so my brain is fuzzy, lol.
     
  8. mandijyn

    mandijyn Rookie

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    Aug 28, 2012

    I've seen great results using Spalding Phonograms - each letter sound has a verbal and kinesthetic response cued with cards. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwGG8v6_pds After the basics are in place we practice with phonogram bingo, I have__ who has__? and my favorite phonogram charades: give just the gestures to spell out sight words. The kids love it and it is so beneficial with both reading and writing!
     
  9. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

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    Aug 28, 2012

    I use a combination of Jolly Phonics and THRASS (Teaching Handwriting Reading and Spelling Skills). The Jolly Phonics is fun and each sound has a action. As we go over a phonic I expose them to the THRASS pictures with the spelling, so when we do /b/, the picture is a bird (spelt with one /b/) and a rabbit (spelt with 2 /b/s). This exposes the children to spelling choices which they will focus more on in grade 1.

    I try to follow the Jolly Phonics order of sounds but introduce /ee/ and /th/ sooner so that we can build on sights words ('the', 'see', 'this', 'that', etc). Generally it is, s, a, t, i, p, n, c/k, e, h, r, m, etc (you will need to check this) As each sound is introduced I also introduce the sightword that can be spelt/sounded with it. The first 6 sounds give us a lot of 3 letter words.

    Everything I write I breakdown into single sounds (the phonemes), even their names when we do the job chart, the days of the week, words that start with the sound we break down and use a chopping motion with the arm. Every time we hear a single sound we chop and put up a finger, counting the sounds in a word. The children are very good at hearing sounds in words now and this also helps their spelling.

    We do lots of phonic activities and www.fcrr.org is a great website for resources.
     
  10. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Aug 28, 2012

    :yeahthat:

    Winner, winner, chicken dinner!
     

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