Period at the end of a sentence!

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by jeljohns, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. jeljohns

    jeljohns Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 29, 2011

    How do you teach this? My kids just aren't getting it. They just put periods in their writing randomly. I've tried to teach them what a sentence is, but they just don't get what a full sentence is, so that's part of the problem. When they read their writing they can't "hear" where the sentence should stop. This is grades 1 and 2. It's driving me nuts!

    Anyone have idea that helped it click with their students?
     
  2.  
  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,740
    Likes Received:
    1,660

    Nov 29, 2011

    It can be difficult especially if the academic program up till now had kids writing before they understood the basics of sentences. Writing has become a brain dump for kids and typically people speak in run on sentences all the time. This is what the kids produce and since we no longer teach students from the basics up but focus on getting the ideas out, we've lost the teaching of basic sentence structure and grammar. Going back is difficult.

    I would teach some lessons on basic sentences and keep going over these mini lessons until they understand the basics of a sentence.

    I go.
    I like dogs.
    I like brown dogs.
     
  4. tgim

    tgim Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    845
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 29, 2011

    It is critical that they understand the concept of subject/predicate. I teach that the subject is the "who" or "what" the sentence is about....works for 2nd and 3rd graders. The predicate tells what the subject "is" or "does," as in an action verb and whatever comes after that. When you get to a new "who" or "what," you start a new sentence. We later add a conjunction after a comma and make a compound sentence.
     
  5. lovetoteachtpt

    lovetoteachtpt Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 29, 2011

    I agree with the mini lessons, and also using an example of their writing.. like reading it without stopping. Does that sound right? Maybe you could even do an incentive if they use their periods correctly, they can get a fun sticker on their writing (I don't know how some feel about this, but it is a big motivator and a cute way for them to get excited about using periods and motivated to write)
     
  6. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2005
    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    9

    Nov 29, 2011

    When you figure it out, let me know. I teach middle school and have the same problem!!!!!!!!

    I have said that a period goes "where you take a breath" and that helps SOME kids.
     
  7. MissAnt

    MissAnt Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2010
    Messages:
    261
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 29, 2011


    I was always taught this about commas though.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,949
    Likes Received:
    2,101

    Nov 29, 2011

    I've always found if I told second or third graders to 'go find some places to put periods', they pretty much put them in the right places. They don't find all the places all the time, but they can find some places to put them.:thumb:
     
  9. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,592
    Likes Received:
    4

    Nov 29, 2011

    I demonstrate through reading the stories they write. I also use the breath pause to notice where the period goes and that usually helps a lot. I also use the and in exchange for a period. I show them comparisons between lists which use and and sentences where the "and" is put in the place of a period. I also do chants about what goes at the beginning and what goes at the end of sentences. I also use expanding sentence examples and what makes a sentence. I teach them basic editing. I do mini lessons where they have to figure out what I forgot in my story. I do it the different things all year long. At this point in the year I expect about half my class to use periods and capitals most of the time and the other half to range from none to capitals and punctuation all over the place. By the end of the year almost every one is using punctuation and capitals most of the time.
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,862
    Likes Received:
    734

    Nov 29, 2011

    I think students just need tons of review in this area. I hit basic writing conventions really hard in my class- I feel like they are not taught as much with "new writing ideas" where teachers just ask students to "get their ideas out." When they "get thier ideas out" they're constantly practicing it wrong, and many of them don't realize what they need to correct when they try to go back and edit their writing later. As a special ed teacher, I try to really think about what skills are non-negotiable for my students to have long term, and I think writing a correct sentence is a big one. Even my really low students can at least write a simple, grammatically correct sentence with a capital and a period because I've just drilled it over and over. When we write, I put a list of simple things on the board that I expect them to remember to do/edit themselves. For my lowest students, this includes starting with a capital, no capitals in the middle unless it's a name, having one idea in the sentence, and ending with punctuation. Every single day before they write I say, "Every sentence in the world starts with a _________ (they respond) and ends with __________." We always, always, always practice writing with correct conventions, no matter what kind of assignment it is, and I never have them "just get their ideas out and fix it later." When they practice doing it right hundreds of times, it eventually will stick. Some of my students do well with understanding subject/predicate, and some really do "get it' when I just tell them that their sentence has to have one complete idea. I remind them that we don't say and, and, and in a sentence. If they tend to use too many periods/put periods in the middle of what their sentence should be, I ask them to read it out loud and pretend they were going to walk up to someone and say that sentence. Would the person understand the complete idea from what they said? It's a simple thing to think about it, but my kids really understand that. If they write, "I am going. To play outside today" we talk about how if they just went up to someone and said "I am going" and stopped the person would be confused. Some activities I use a lot are:
    -Giving them one big paragraph that's a run-on sentence and have them decide where the periods should go. Then they read it out loud with a partner and check their sentences to see if they make sense.
    -Give them a pile of cut-out words and ask them to create a complete sentence out of those choices. If we're specifically working on word order, I give them a complete sentence mixed up and they have to put it in order to make it make sense.
    -Old school DOL sentences- I write a couple of sentences on the board, they find the mistakes and come up and fix them. I realize this is an "old idea" but my kids love it because they get to write on the board. Also, in my situation with only having a few at a time, they get to participate tons (I realize in a whole class, it may be an issue that 4-5 kids find the mistakes while the others just sit there).
    -Journaling- and then I hold them responsible for fixing those simple convention mistakes. If they come up to show me I'll just say something like, "I see a sentence that doesn't start with a capital letter, or "I see a sentence that has two ideas in it, can you find it?" rather than marking errors automatically and asking them to just rewrite. We talk about how important it is for other people to be able to understand what they write. Then I let them share out all or part of their entry (with a whole class, you could pair or group students), which they just love.
     
  11. TryingMyBest

    TryingMyBest Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2009
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2011

    Sentence is a complete thought or idea.
    This is how i did - lots of oral sentences to practice. I would say something:
    - Lindsey and I
    - Lindsey and I are best friends
    .... the i ask which sentence is complete? Its super easy and my kids got it first time :)
     
  12. jeljohns

    jeljohns Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 30, 2011

    Thanks for all the replies. At my school we don't teach writing mechanics AT ALL. It makes me really sad and frustrated because I think about how these students will fill out job applications, write college papers, ect.

    I'm an interventionist, so I only have the students 30 minutes a day. In that time I'm expected to teach reading, writing, word work, and language. It's a lot and I don't have time to cram everything in. I'd like to focus more on the writing mechanics since I know they aren't getting that in the main classroom.
     
  13. queenie

    queenie Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,392
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 4, 2011

    PRACTICE! Give them some sentences without end marks and tell them how many periods to put in. Then talk about it.

    Teach subject/predicate (naming part/telling part)
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ally06
Total: 388 (members: 2, guests: 365, robots: 21)
test