Peer Editing sheet?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by MisterG, Nov 3, 2006.

  1. MisterG

    MisterG Comrade

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    Nov 3, 2006

    Hi all,
    I knew I was going to forget this yesterday when I posted a question asking for guided reading sheets.

    Im also looking for peer editing sheets that students can use when they work with others and review each others works.

    If you have one, can you zip me a copy via email?
    Thanks!,
    Ryan
     
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  3. Alegre

    Alegre Rookie

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    Nov 3, 2006

  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 4, 2006

    Peer Edit Response Form
    Your name: _______________________

    Author’s name: ________________________

    You are being asked to look at the criteria for scoring a paper on the Student Friendly Guide to Writing with Traits. Then, you need to assign a score from one (worst) to six (best) on each of the six traits about the paper. Read the criteria for each trait as you score the paper on those traits.

    Ideas and Content
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6

    Organization
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6

    Voice
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6

    Sentence Fluency
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6

    Word Choice
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6

    Conventions
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6


    Finish the following statements as best you can. Remember, your job is to help the writer.

    1. One thing I really like about the writing is …




    2. One thing I think the author can improve upon is …




    3. Something I would like the author to tell me more about is …




    4. One last comment is …
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 4, 2006

    Peer Editing Worksheet

    A peer edit is not an itemized list of broad impressions, problems, or compliments, but should represent a sustained and sympathetic argumentative engagement with the text you are reading. Editors, you should provide comments in the form of a short essay that clearly answers all or most of the following questions:

    1. What is your own name?
    2. What is the name of the papers author?
    3. What is the title of the paper?
    4. Did the paper satisfy the expectations raised in its title? **
    5. In your own words, state what you think to be the thesis of the paper in one or two sentences. **
    6. Was this thesis expressed clearly in the paper itself?
    7. Is this a strong thesis?
    8. Why or why not?
    9. Can you imagine an intelligent opposition to this thesis?
    10. What might this be?
    11. Does the author remain true to this thesis through the paper? **
    12. Were there important terms that needed stronger or clearer definitions? **
    13. If yes, what were they?
    14. Did the author use quotations from the text effectively to justify and illustrate their interpretations?
    15. Did the author anticipate relevant objections to their various claims? **
    16. Name an objection that either should have been addressed or which warranted a deeper exploration than the paper presently provides.
    17. Did the authors address of possible objections contribute to the strength of the case the paper is making, or distract from that case as you understood it?
    18. Comment on the papers line of argument (its overall clarity, the smoothness of its transitions and substantiations, the order in which it developed its points, etc.). **
    19. Comment on the papers prose (style, grammar, sentence construction, punctuation, etc.).
    20. What qualities did you like best about the paper? **
    21. What is the single most important aspect of the paper that the author should work on before handing it in?

    Things to consider as you read the comments of your editors:

    1. What were the problems or concerns that most preoccupied you about your paper before beginning this peer editing process?
    2. Were those concerns addressed by your editors? [If not, demand that they are.]
    3. For each editor, which comments were most helpful to you?
    4. Which comments would be more helpful if they were clarified or amplified somewhat? [Ask for clarifications or examples or suggestions on these issues.]

    You should note that these are the questions which guide my own readings of your papers, and that my marginal comments and concluding discussion will tend to register my preoccupation with these same questions.

    **These are questions you should make a habit of asking of any text at all that you are reading critically.
     
  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 4, 2006

    Before sharing your story with a peer editor, you want to polish it as extensively as possible. The goal is to turn it into a well told story. What matters isn't what the story is, but how it is told. The pre-editing is to help you polish the story and make it at successful as possible.

    I. 1st Page Evaluation

    The first page has to accomplish several things. Evaluate your story with each in mind and rewrite where needed.

    A. First lines. Are the first lines interesting? Do they encourage you to read on?

    B. Is whatever introduced in the first page part of the last page? Generally the last page of your story is what the story is about. Rewrite the first page to match the last, not the other way around.

    C. Does the 1st page introduce the main character?

    D. Does the 1st page establish the setting?

    E. Does the 1st page establish the conflict?

    II. Scene Evaluation

    Each scene has to accomplish several things. Identify the scenes first, then evaluate them with the goals in mind. Rewrite where needed.

    A. Is it clear where and when the scene is in relationship to the previous scene?

    B. Are there appeals to at least three senses (sight, sound, smell, touch, taste)?

    C. Does the scene advance the story?

    D. Does the scene raise the stakes (make the conflict more important or deepen suspense)?

    E. Does the scene have a beginning, middle and end?

    III. Character Evaluation

    The main character needs to be more than a name.

    A. Does the main character have a physical description that touches on the important elements?

    B. Does the main character have a past?

    C. Does the main character have a distinct way of speaking?

    D. Does the main character reveal who she/he is by actions/thoughts/appearance/speech, etc.?

    IV. Style

    A. Have you read the story outloud to hear awkwardness?

    B. Have you eliminated unneeded words (be suspicious of any word ending in "ly" and intensifiers like "very")?

    C. Have you used specific nouns and verbs?
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 4, 2006

    This rubric is intended as a general description of your story. It is possible that some areas of the rubric would not be appropriate for the story you wrote. For example, some stories may not need a strong setting, or it may be possible that characterization is not the focus of the story; if that is the case, then the story will not be evaluated in that area. For some stories, this rubric wouldn't apply at all; if that is the case, then a separate written explanation of the evaluation would be used.

    Characterization:

    _____ Advanced: Characters are strongly drawn, clearly separate and fully developed. The main character(s) are presented in multiple ways (appearance, action, thoughts, speech, etc.). They behave "within" their character. They have a past and a future.

    _____ Proficient: Characters are clear and reasonably developed. The main character(s) have identifiable characteristics. They may seem to lack a past or future.

    _____ In-Progress: Characters are unclear. They may be little more than a name and a description or do not rise beyond stereotype. They may be unbelievably inconsistent, or there may not be enough information to form a judgement about them.

    Plot:

    _____ Advanced: What the conflict is in the story is clear and the importance of it to the characters is convincing. Actions will produce new situations which will produce new actions. The characters will struggle with their problems in interesting and meaningful ways. The story will have a satisfying and logical climax that is the culmination of the proceeding events. The story explores and develops its SF element. The SF is integral to the plot.

    _____ Proficient: What the conflict is in the story is clear. The importance of the conflict to the characters may be fuzzy, although it will clearly be important. Actions will produce new situations which will produce new actions. The characters will struggle with their problems. The story will have a climax that is the culmination of the proceeding events. The story explores its SF element.

    _____ In-Progress: The conflict may be unclear or absent. The conflict may be clear, but the importance of it to the characters will never be communicated. There may be no actions (the story is static), or the actions do not seem related to an identifiable conflict. The characters may be passive and not struggle. The story may lack a climax that is the culmination of the proceeding events. There is an SF element, but the story would be no different without it, or there is no SF.

    Setting, Narration and Exposition, and Appeals to the Senses:

    _____ Advanced: Where the story takes place is clearly drawn and has an impact on the story. The reader will experience the story through multiple appeals to several senses. An appropriate amount of the story is shown rather than told.

    _____ Proficient: Where the story takes place is clear. The story makes appeals to the senses. Some of the story is shown rather than told.

    _____ In Progress: Where the story takes place may be unclear or setting may be absent altogether. The story may make very limited or no appeals to the senses. Most of the story is told rather than shown.

    Style (use of language):

    _____ Advanced: The style is appropriate to the story and heightens its effectiveness. This may include interesting and appropriate figurative language, diction and syntax. Sentences will be varied in length and type. The relationships between the parts of the story will be smoothly handled and clear.

    _____ Proficient: The style will not interfere with the understanding of the story. Writing will be workmanlike and clear. The relationships between the parts of the story will be clear.

    _____ In-Progress: The style will interfere with the understanding of the story. Sentences may need to be reread for meaning. Transitions may be absent. The relationships between the parts of the story may be unclear.

    Mechanics:

    _____ Advanced: The story will be closely proofread and will contain few or no errors in punctuation, sentence structure, grammar, spelling, capitalization, etc. The manuscript is "clean" and in proper format.

    _____ Proficient: The story will be reasonably well proofread. There may be some errors, but they do not interfere with the understanding of the story. The manuscript is "clean" and in proper format.

    _____ In-Progress: The story will show little evidence of proofreading. Proofreading errors will be pervasive and interfere with the understanding of the story. The manuscript may be sloppy or not in proper format.

    Overall:

    _____ Advanced: All the elements of the story will work together in a successful way. The meaningfulness of the narrative will be apparent, compelling and artful.

    _____ Proficient: The story is competently told. The meaningfulness of the narrative will be apparent.

    _____ In-Progress: The elements of the story may not work together. The meaningfulness of the narrative may be absent or confusing.
     
  8. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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  9. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 4, 2006

    PEER EDITING WORKSHEET

    The Introductory Paragraph(s):

    What's memorable to me? What phrases catch my attention?


    Is the purpose of the paper made clear? What is the paper's thesis?


    Is there a brief summary of the story/stories which makes sense to you and which provides enough context for the argument which follows?


    The Body of the Paper:

    What words, phrases, and passages seem important, generative, resonant? (These passages need not be the paper's intended focus. They are simply moments which grab your attention.)


    What do you want to hear more about?


    What is the strongest use of textual evidence to support the argument? What is the weakest evidence? Where does the writer need to provide evidence where there is none?


    NOTES:
     
  10. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 4, 2006

    http://classroom.jc-schools.net/read/peerlist.htm

    Use this list to check over your paper before your conference.

    Mark the column for each item with a after you have checked the paper carefully.

    Writer
    Peer Editor
    Checked for:

    I followed directions.

    I read the paper to my partner for understanding.

    I checked the paper for complete sentences.

    I used correct grammar.

    I have spelled all Word Wall Words correctly.

    All sentences start with a capital letter.

    Proper nouns are capitalized.

    Each sentence ends with a proper end mark.

    Commas and quotation marks are used correctly.

    I indented the beginning of each paragraph.

    I followed the writing process.



    My name is on the paper.
     
  11. MisterG

    MisterG Comrade

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    Nov 15, 2006

    Thanks everyone for your replies. I didn't forget about this thread. Just started to get into peer editing a little bit today. This evening, I started to create a peer editing sheet for use in my classroom; combining bits and pieces from most of the ideas on here.
     

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