PDD Student in After School Program

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by teachdeaf15, Feb 10, 2011.

  1. teachdeaf15

    teachdeaf15 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 10, 2011

    Hi!

    I am a Kindergarten teacher with a student who has been diagnosed with PDD. He is doing pretty well in the classroom, but is having a very difficult time in the After School Program. There are about 50 kids in the program ranging from K-6 grade. The first hour is a study hall/ homework and then the kids can play outside or in the gym. My student has been getting in to trouble in the After School Program. He is not displaying any of the same behaviors in class. I am trying to offer suggestions to the teachers in after school, so that the student can have a positive experience. The teachers in after school don't understand his special needs and have been unwilling to adapt for him.

    Thank you for all of your help!!! :)
     
  2.  
  3. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,061
    Likes Received:
    2

    Feb 10, 2011

    Can you educate the After School staff? If you find one person that wants to help, she might be able to convert the others.

    Maybe you can write something on his IEP so the afterschool staff has to accomodate him.
     
  4. renmew

    renmew Rookie

    Joined:
    May 31, 2010
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    2

    Feb 10, 2011

    Your last sentence says it all. They are unwilling to adapt. What, do they think he can just up and decide to be normal after the school day ends. Tell them exactly how you handle him in school, and then get something worked into the IEP to make it legal. I've had similar problems with stupid people this week.
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Feb 11, 2011

    Call for an IEP meeting and invite the afterschool teachers
     
  6. teachdeaf15

    teachdeaf15 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2011

    Thank you so much for your suggestions!

    The things that I have been doing with him in class are becoming ineffective. I have never worked with a student quite like him and my administration has no clue how to help me either. My student is often off task and can't complete anything. I have tried and desk by himself, a table with a group and nothing is working. He can't share materials, but won't use his own. He is becoming increasingly defiant and the others students are noticing his special needs.

    He doesn't yet have an IEP. I am working with my administration to get him the services he needs. My county does RtI (Response to Intervention) and I have to be able to prove beyond the medical diagnoses that this student meets qualifications for the ASD Program. I have tried some things, but am in need of more interventions and strategies for my student.

    I will try anything! THANK YOU!!!!
     
  7. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 15, 2011

    Have you made a visual schedule? You could use clipart, google image photos, or real photos, or download the 30 day free trial of boardmaker from mayor johnson's website. They also have a sharing website called boardmakershare.com and you may be able to find some things that you may be able to use with him there.

    Here is a list of suggestions:
    visual schedule
    social stories
    token economy system for work completion or desired behaviors
    sensory breaks
    visual rule reminder cards
    and just visuals in general
     
  8. teachdeaf15

    teachdeaf15 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 16, 2011

    Thanks Teacher12345 for all the great suggestions. What is a sensory break?
     
  9. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,029
    Likes Received:
    1,974

    Feb 16, 2011

    Why don't you try showing your administation the new clarification from OSEP that says that RTI can't be used to dely evaluation. This student has a diagnosed disability. Obviously it is interfering in his education or he wouldn't be in RTI. An IEP isn't about a particular program the school has, that should be determined after all evaluations in any suspected area of disability is complete and all data is looked at. Then program should be selected.

    http://www.copaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/OSEP.RTI_.memo_.01-21-111.pdf
    check out the link. It is rather clear.
     
  10. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Feb 16, 2011

    It's pretty much giving the student a break to help them maintain equilibrium

    Like giving them a puzzle to do after doing some work (if they like puzzles, that is)
     
  11. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 16, 2011

    A sensory break could be doing something such as going on an errand taking something to the office or to another teacher, moving heavy books from one room to another, brain gym activities, wall pushes, chair push-ups, desk push-ups, etc.
     
  12. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,769
    Likes Received:
    232

    Feb 19, 2011

    So, there seems to be 2 issues here - one, how to help the child, and two, how to help the child in the after-school program.

    With the first question, what is the anticipated timeline for determination of SPED eligibility? If you think he'll start receiving services in a few weeks, for example, you may just need to get through a few more days. Doing any big time planning probably doesn't make a whole lot of sense. However, if your county requires weeks and weeks of intervention data showing poor response to intervention, you may need to do more work on your own.

    Side note here - if your district is expecting you to show multiple weeks/months worth of failed intervention data to show poor response to intervention as a qualification for SPED services, RtI is being used incorrectly here. RtI is good and research-based, but primarily for reading/math "LD-type" concerns. Using RtI, for example, to show that a child with an "intellectual disability" needs support by expected them to fail for a certain number of weeks/months makes no sense, because the identified disability should be enough evidence that additional support will be required. Even with general behavioral concerns, very little work nationwide is being done in this area - there are still substantial questions about how to measure effective Tier I instruction related to behavior support, how to even establish building/district norms related to behavior, etc. In other words, here's my point - a child with a PDD diagnosis will likely have behavioral needs beyond the realm of general education - even if served in the gen ed setting, more intensive planning/monitoring/intervention design support will likely be required. Is your district set up to effectively monitor response to intervention in the behavioral realm? How long are they expecting you to conduct interventions without success before they're willing to consider eligibility? This is an unfortunate byproduct of RtI - its a good system when its used the right way, but too many people don't understand and use it in ways that ultimately end up hurting kids, not helping them.

    EDIT: I just looked at your profile and saw that you are from Florida - I worked there for a while too :). They have a relatively new system of RtI there that focuses on behavior, using office discipline referrals as a means of assessment. Florida is actually a leader in this area. Are they expecting behavioral progress before considering eligibility, or academic, or both? I'm not sure how that behavioral RtI system has played out down there, or whether your district was/is one of the pilot districts that is actually implementing the behavioral component of RtI.

    Alright, now that that's out of the way :). After-school program - I agree with renmew's comment that the "unwillingness" says it all. I have been very involved with after-school programs for a number of years, and unfortunately its a field that has developed out of a necessity to fill a time slot, not out of a professional desire to help children. Not that there aren't some great people out there in after-school programs, but they were created to supervise kids until 6:00 - not to educate, change behavior, etc. This is changing somewhat, and there are some programs out there that have started developing goals and specific activities in these areas, and are doing good work. However, most after-school programs and staff in those programs see their job primarily as "babysitting," and bad behavior is seen as a problem with the child that the child should fix - not something that would require a different approach on their part.

    Unfortunately, I've found that if someone doesn't want to change, they probably won't. Your best bet is probably to focus on building a positive relationship with the staff there - possibly even finding one of the staff members who is more open to you. If you have time, stop by a few days each week at the program and visit with the staff and kids, if you'd be allowed to. The more the staff trusts you and likes you, the more they may listen.

    However, kids with bigger behavioral issues, especially with diagnoses in the PDD area, are going to require a lot of support and work beyond the skill-level and capacity of the staff at the after-school program. This leads me to my next question, which is the support of the family in this situation? The best course for you to take would likely be to work with the family on finding a better after-school program. However, transportation, cost, etc. can come into play, and if you're working with a family that isn't able to help in all of those areas, you may be limited.

    In some localities, there are specialty after-school programs for kids with disabilities, and state child-care licensing agencies will maintain a list of child-care/after-school programs that accept children with disabilities. These lists can be hugely deceptive - many after-school programs say they'll accept children with disabilities without any intention of actually serving them, but some states actually mandate by state law that after-school program incorporate IEPs into their curriculum. If and when the IEP happens, that may be a way to build support. However, trying to find another after-school program may be the best route, rather than working with an unwilling one.

    Finally, if the parent(s)/family is home after school, it may be better just to skip the after-school program altogether and have the child stay with his family. I don't know the family situation at all, but there isn't anything inherently good about after-school programs - they're only as good as they are, well, good!
     
  13. teachdeaf15

    teachdeaf15 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 22, 2011

    Well... the timeline for services is next year! :( We recieved the diagnosed before winter break and the county is delaying the process. I can not see anything happening in the next few weeks.

    I am a new teacher and am not very familair with the RtI process and my administration is doing the best they can, but they aren't sure how to complete the RtI steps for the student either and the district isn't helping.

    The after school program is a baby-sitting service...I am trying to help the staff by sharing what has been wroking in class and new things that I have found. We met last week to discuss the struggles of the staff and the student and they seem more flexible.

    The family is desperate for help. They are realizing that our school is not the best environment for the student, but don't have the resources to go elsewhere. (We are an inner city charter school.)

    I appreciate your time and advice. I am hoping to post good news in the future!! :)
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,029
    Likes Received:
    1,974

    Feb 22, 2011

    If admin really wants to help, have them use the OSEP clarification with the district. It specifically says that a school can't use RTI to delay evaluation. They clarified this because not all disability symptoms fall under the RTI umbrella. Special education includes academic, functional, and behavioral skills, not just test grades.
     
  15. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,769
    Likes Received:
    232

    Feb 25, 2011

    That's great news that you were able to meet with them and that they seemed open - that's a huge step. Too bad about the delay - that's been an unfortunate byproduct of RtI - not enough people that really have been trained in the process, or that understand it even with training, yet being forced to move to that system. Although, I will say SPED eligibility processes have been known to drag on, even before RtI :). I guess it sounds like you're on your own until the Fall, both in the classroom and with helping the after-school program, at least in terms of additional "hands on deck."

    I'm definitely not an expert in PDD/Autism, but I know there are tons of books/resources written in simple language out there for parents, and will all kinds of plans/systems. It may be worth a Saturday afternoon or Tuesday evening in Barnes and Noble (or on Amazon) looking for a quick read for some good, specific ideas. There have been some good ideas posted on this thread for sure, but nothing will be as good as getting your hands on a good resource for yourself and to share with the staff.

    Another thought I had before I saw the success with the staff - find a fifth grade teacher with a student in the after-school program who is responsible and would want the responsibility of "looking out" for the child in your room - not sure if the child would be way too much, but sometimes if you empower a group of older kids (usually girls :)), they not only are willing to help out, but they really like it. You may not know kids in that grade, but if you ask a few of the fourth/fifth grade teachers they may be willing to help.

    Just a few more thoughts :)
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. rpan
Total: 188 (members: 3, guests: 162, robots: 23)
test