PBIS rewards

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, Jul 19, 2016.

  1. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jul 22, 2016

    I just think about students who are sexually or physically abused HAVE to fight back. It's the only way that they can cope and survive. Simply saying, "No" and "talking it out" doesn't really STOP the abuse. So if the child has to, GO for it! And that's exactly the point that was being made. But there is a time and place and if the child doesn't know the difference or ever learns about rules and boundaries, some don't, this is when they get into real trouble. :(

    By the way, I love when the counselor comes in to have that "talk" with the kids and it's very generic and unhelpful. And I've sat through so many lessons in my short time as a teacher.

    I wish certain people just wouldn't have children!
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2016
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  2. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    Jul 23, 2016

    I came from a PBIS school and I loved it. Most rewards were verbal praise. When a student went above and beyond their usual they recievd a "buck" they saved for a bigger rewards - lunch with the principal, perform on stage at lunch, name on announcements, etc.

    It was a school wide initive so it was already running smoothly when I came so that made it easy. We didn't give kids a "buck" for doing things they're suppose to do. Even the troublemakig toots. That's my hangup at my new school. We don't have a school wide thing like PBIS and I don't believe in telling so and so they ca go to the "treasure box" because they got their act together and behaved all day in class. That's what they're suppose to do. Verbal praise is where it's at. Following rules and doing what you should be doing at school isn't something you should get a party, food, toy, etc for.

    On of my kiddos held the door for a fifth grader and he got a big smile and a thank you. I think he loved the thanks so much he ended up holding the door for the entire 5th grade going into the cafeteria. This was a student who usually had to be one of the first ones in the line because that was his routine and getting off that especially with his food (his high behavior meltdown triggers) was amazing. He got bukoo bucks from all the 5th grade teachers and he understood why he got them. He went above and way out of his autistic comfort zone. That's what the bucks are for IMO.
     
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  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jul 23, 2016

    I agree that it can work this way in a school that is functioning well and most kids are doing what they are supposed to be doing most of the time.

    What was the strategy for large numbers of kids not doing what they are supposed to do or kids where the behavior is not their perceived disability getting in the way doing things wrong? How is that handled? Is it handled like the excellent video that Vickylynn shared or in a different manner?
     
  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Last edited: Jul 24, 2016
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  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 23, 2016





     
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  7. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Jul 24, 2016

    vicki,, those videos were great and gave me a much better idea of what this is all supposed to look like.
     
  8. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Interesting conversation folks! My 2 cents, quite late:

    Hitting back
    Yes, it can be immediately functional, but dangerous to resort to solving interpersonal community problems through violence. It's not that just kids resort to violence, and when they turn 16/18 they magically stop. Plenty of parents of kids we work with also think that "hitting back" is the only way to solve problems. It's really solving a problem if you end up with an assault conviction on your record. That being said, it's one of those argument traps that a lot of teachers do fall into.

    Personally, and this is more broad than just the hitting back issue, but I like to take the approach of teaching options rather than forcing options. Explain the bad AND good results of hitting back - acknowledging that hitting back does actually provide benefits usually gets a child's ear.

    Rewards vs "Doing it because it's right"
    I largely agree with the comments so far - in short, yes we need to "jump start" behaviors through unrelated rewards, but gradually move kids to doing things for "deeper" reasons (values, community benefit, etc.).

    Rewarding for things they're "supposed to do"
    Sure, ultimately, you don't want to reward for things you don't have to. We generally like to "fade out" reinforcement over time and "fade in" natural reinforcement. Different schools/environments will be different - in some you may have to reinforce for small things, in some you may not. That one school doesn't isn't evidence that none should.

    One thing to keep in mind, as others have pointed out, is that a PBIS system is dynamic. It changes over time as the behavioral culture of a school changes. Target behaviors may shift from very basic ones, at the beginning, to more complex ones as the system evolves. RtI/MTSS also applies here - different students/groups may need different things.

    M&M Therapy
    This wasn't really ever a nickname for the integrated system of PBIS. It was more of a nickname for simple reinforcement systems. PBIS involves a lot more - not just in terms of structuring those rewards, but in terms of teaching behaviors, schoolwide problem-solving, etc.

    Overall
    I don't see PBIS as inherently contrasted with "intrinsic" reward - I see it as a means toward achieving it.
     
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  9. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jul 26, 2016

    Hitting back

    I agree that it is not a long term solution, nor should it be the first line of defense. The biggest issue I see is that those in charge do not address the issues that are happening. Whether right or wrong, in a dysfunctional system people make choices to protect themselves even if those choices are poor in the long term. In utopia, we would all be choosing to do the right thing so there wouldn't be a need to use aggression.

    I've seen what happens to kids in schools that do not deal with bullies. The kids that don't fight back and don't get support end up with major emotional trauma down the road. Is that really better?

    I would say, in many cases those that think aggression is the only form that works tend to come from environments where aggression is the only form that works. If you are surrounded by people who cannot handle conflict or disagreements, there are no alternative methods because those you try to work with understand nothing else and usually the one who is being targeted has no power to try alternative methods.

    It seems that schools will spend an inordinate amount of time with the kid that fights back compared to the one who is the aggressor because they know that the kid who fought back will probably be more willing to listen to what they say than the one who is the real problem.
     
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