PBIS combined with Green/Yellow/Red cards?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by 773 Miles Away, Jun 7, 2011.

  1. 773 Miles Away

    773 Miles Away Comrade

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    Jun 7, 2011

    Our school is supposedly a PBIS school (i.e. Positive Behavior) yet the primary means of discipline in each classroom is a color system. Student's start the day on Green and during the day their card can change down to red if their behavior is unacceptable. To me, this is negative reinforcement.

    Additionally, the reward they earn can only be earned if they finish each day on green for the entire week. Each color is a point, green is 3 points, yellow is 2 points, orange is 1 point, and red is 0. If they end the day on yellow they can cover their losses by making sure they do their homework completely and on time (earn a bonus point). Thus, for a regular 5 day week if you are Green everyday and you do your homework everday you earn 15 + 5 points.

    I just feel as though turning colors to highlight their misbehavior is the absolute opposite of PBIS. Thoughts?
     
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  3. zoerba

    zoerba Comrade

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    Jun 8, 2011

    You should look into CHAMPS. It kind of goes along with PBIS. Our school is using both and the CHAMPS book (maybe website?) has several good ideas for behavior management.

    I think a pull-card system can work - as long as they are working to earn something. I think PBIS calls it a token system ??
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jun 8, 2011

    PBIS uses a token system. I think that there can be consequence, but it should not be the only part.

    I use a modified color plan. Basically, I have three consequence levels but also three reward levels (earning privileges in the classroom).
     
  5. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Jun 8, 2011

    PBIS focuses on specific behaviors to train. I don't think that the students receiving the PBIS points should be tied in with the color system. For instance if the PBIS behavior that you are working on is quiet in the hallway, that is totally unrelated to if a student gets on red for talking in class. If their behavior in the hallway is great, then they should get the PBIS reward.

    If you want to change a students color for a behavior that you are also focusing on with PBIS (staying on task for example) take that opportunity to reward the students that are on task instead of changing the color of those students that aren't on task. The positive reinforcement that the others received might be the push the student needs to get back on task. Then later you can reward them also for getting back on task and staying on task.

    Remember, you are supposed to flood students with PBIS tickets (or whatever you use to reward them) for the focus behavior. If they can only get one PBIS point per day and it is for every behavior throughout the day then your school isn't really using PBIS in the manner that is prescribed. My district is big on PBIS and two of our schools are PBIS model schools, so if you have any questions or would like some resources please feel free to PM me.
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jun 8, 2011

    Our school uses PBIS and the traffic light. I personally refused to use the traffic light in my classroom and explained it to our behavior specialist why I did so. I felt the same as you. It is contradictory. It's not that you can't have a consequence or a negative reinforcement, but rather it is set up as a visual and consistent system for doing so which directly contradicts PBIS. I am more in line with the Love and Logic philosophy with PBIS.

    We also use DEBUG as a problem solving strategy and we reinforce Ron Clark's 55 Essential Rules (focus on one each week). These I see more in line with PBIS so I support these in my classroom.

    I also laughed because last year I had an aide come in and was upset because I didn't have the traffic light up and didn't understand why I wasn't following the rest of the school. I told her I already had "permission" and why I didn't use it.

    The color changing system, I DO believe can have its place. I'm not against it in its entirety at all. I just felt it was confusing for me to use it with PBIS and contradictory at best.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Jun 8, 2011

    I agree it is contradictory, cutNglue. What is the school's defense in using contradictory systems?
     
  8. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jun 8, 2011

    I won't go there since this was my workplace. :)
     
  9. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Jun 8, 2011

    no problem
     
  10. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Jun 8, 2011

    I've worked at a PBIS school before and we were allowed a little wiggle room so long as we had the chart hanging up in the classroom.

    I had the 5 color chart in my old room (purple = superstar, green = good job, yellow = warning, red = no recess/time out and blue = parental contact)

    Anyhow, what I used to do, is move the kids when they were acting up, BUT i would go out of my way to allow them to move back up. That way even if they acted up, they got the opportunity to improve their behavior and possibly go home on a positive color.

    I did not follow points. I created my own system for prizes. Like if you get 5 greens or purples for the week, you go to the prize box. If you have all greens or purples and one yellow, you get a small prize, like a sticker.

    I don't think it was negative reinforcement for my class because it worked well and helped me manage behavior.

    I would ask your PBIS school rep (at my school it was the social studies teacher) about wiggle room and see if you can alter the plan to suit your personal management style.
     
  11. janney

    janney Cohort

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    Jun 8, 2011

    http://www.pbis.org/school/primary_level/default.aspx

    PBIS is tied in with RTi and NCLB. Its focus is that schools have set expectations and they have a way to teach those expectations. It is also all about the data. Students who are discipline problems need to be monitored and put on tiers for behavior.

    PBIS does not state that you have to give rewards or prizes for good behavior nor does it state that you cannot have a color system or other similar system in place in your classroom. http://www.pbis.org/pbis_resource_detail_page.aspx?Type=4&PBIS_ResourceID=192 PBIS says that your rules and corrections should be stated in a positive way rather than a lot of don'ts. It also states that students should be given more positive feed back than negative. I believe it said a 4:1 ratio (I see you're walking in a straight line, thank you for being so quiet in the hallway, I like how you went to the end of the line when so and so was bothering you, please have quiet feet in the hallway...)

    I personally do have a color system. I don't post it in the room; I keep track of their behaviors on a clipboard chart. The students don't have any trouble remembering their behavior. I don't think that everyone that does a color system is only changing cards or colors. Negative behaviors that my students show have natural consequences (ie: not using materials correcty leads to loss of materials). If I have to remind a student more than two times of an expected behavior their conduct grade/color will change.

    I use the colors because it is easier for my kinder students to understand and they put the color in their take home folder and it's a quick way for parents to see how their child's behavior is at school and see patterns in their behavior (ie: so and so always is on blue on the monday after visiting so and so). I know that some teachers in my school only send home a behavior report once a week (manditory by the school) and others send one home every day like I do. For this age group I feel they benefit from a daily report because they most likely won't remember on Friday what happened on Monday but I probably would not use a color system past first or second grade.
     
  12. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jun 8, 2011

    I just switched from the behavior cards as of ast week. Now, my kids can move back for making poor choices (with consequences after the first move), and they can move forward for making good choices and be being kind and respectful neighbors, etc. (with rewards). I must say, I wish I has used this system since the beginning. Today is the first day someone moved all the way possible in the positive side, and he is the last one I would have suspected. So, it's working! :)
     
  13. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jun 8, 2011

    I personally am not challenging the effectiveness of the color changing system. I'm just curious to know more about how to justify using it with PBIS without it being contradictory.

    Janney, you made an interesting point about PBIS.

    In general though, I'm seeing people say they use the system but I don't see anyone's justification as to how it does or does not contradict the philosophy of PBIS. I'm really curious for more feedback on this thread. Interesting topic!!
     
  14. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jun 8, 2011

    Yeah, it's seems to be a somewhat common misconception that PBIS only includes reinforcement, with no components of punishment. I'm not a huge fan of color-coded/card systems generally because there are so few steps between the first and last stops that a few important problems arise. However, consequences generally aren't contradictory to a PBIS system. I would actually consider no consequences to be an inappropriate PBIS system overall. Generally, it's considered best practice - whether in a PBIS system or not - to start with reinforcement, and use that as the primary component of "consequences" (which includes both punishment and reinforcement), but to include components of punishments as well when appropriate.
     
  15. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Jun 9, 2011

    Some of our teachers have implemented the Nurtured Heart Approach in our classroom which is ALL positive, no negative. Students take a positive "time out" (sometimes just called a break) when they are misbehaving, off task, etc. to give them a minute to regroup and hopefully keep them from going into crisis.

    However these teacher kept their card systems in the classrooms anyway because they determined they did need some time of system for if a student refuses to take a time out. it was especially helpful in the beginning when the students were becoming used to the whole idea. from what ive heard students rarely refuse to take a break anymore and they dont need to use the cards.
     

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